The Streets of Leamington beginning with A and B

Streets beginning with | A and B | C |

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the number of buildings or addresses, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Abbott Street. 1813. Named for William Abbotts, owner of the first baths and the New Inn/later Bath Hotel in Bath Street. Note that the ‘S’ has been lost from the street name and sign at some time. Off Bath Street.
Close to the site of Abbotts’ Baths opened in 1786.
The corner with Bath Place was the site of an early market in town from about 1813; this was rebuilt about 1841 and named Prince Market by 1848; a shopfront in the street from 1818 is Listed Grade II. Clarke, silversmith, the ‘pencil case man’ was in the street about 1848; the Courier printing works were here from 1855 to 1860; Alexandra Inn at No 1 from 1861 to 1922; Wackrill’s of Bath Street were in the street from about 1865.

Acacia Road. On maps and named in 1890. Probably named for this plant which was recorded on the site. Off No 212 Rugby Road.
One streetlamp agreed in 1904; there were sand and gravel pools at the top end in 1916; more houses were built from 1933; Nos 59-65, a block of eight flats, was agreed in 1988.

Acorn Court. 1982. 46 homes. Close to the Centre Oak of which acorn is the seed. A block of homes off Stockton Grove.

Adelaide Road. 1839. About 20 houses; detached on west side and semi-detached on the east. Named for Queen Adelaide, wife of King William IV. Off Avenue Road.
Work on a new bridge over the River Leam was damaged by flood in 1839, it was eventually completed in 1850; the river was straightened in 1859; the bridge was rebuilt of iron within the existing abutments in 1891 by William de Normanville; the bridge is Listed Grade II; three villas were built on the corner of York Road in 1906; the bridge was renovated 1992 to 1994. See Riverside for other development which were sometimes referred to as Adelaide Road.

Aintree Drive. 1972. About 14 houses, of which most are known as French Houses. Racecourse at Liverpool, named for the site on Stud Farm. Off Valley Road.

Albany Terrace. First found on a map in 1854, first house built about 1884. About 24 homes. This was often a title of a junior member of the royal family; it is also a poetic name for Scotland. Off Warwick Place. No 6 was demolished and replaced by three storey houses about 2000. The Dell is behind the houses on the east side; there were fears of instability at times.

Albert Place 01. Before 1850. About 3 houses in this court in 1852. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria. Demolished about 1957. Off Park Street.

Albert Place 02. Before 1866. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, Off Tachbrook Street; precise location not found.

Albert Place 03. Before 1882. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria. Off Leam Terrace East; precise location not found.

Albert Street.  After 1890. About 28 houses. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria. Off Old Milverton Lane. Possibly an early name was Cemetery Road.

Albion Place. Before 1894. Probably earlier named Swain’s Buildings, 6 houses. Albion is the oldest known name for Great Britain (in Greek). Off Kenilworth Street. Slum clearance after 1953.

Albion Row. 1834. 15 houses. Albion is the oldest known name for Great Britain (in Greek). Off Wise Street, partially alongside the canal.

Albion Terrace. 1852. 6 houses. Albion is the oldest known name for Great Britain (in Greek). Off Althorpe Street, facing the canal.

Alder House. About 2002. About 11 homes. Named for this tree. Apartments at Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Alderton Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 9 homes. Place near Tewkesbury. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Aldwick Close. 1956. 11 houses. Place in West Sussex. Off Lillington Road.

Alexandra Road 01. 1923. 59 addresses. Queen Alexandra, consort to Edward VII. Off Brunswick Street, part of the Rushmore estate. Many houses are Wakerley homes.

Alexandra Road 02. In 1912 it was proposed that Victoria Road should be renamed Alexandra Road the but the proposal was not adopted. Queen Alexandra, consort to Edward VII.

Alexandra Road 03. In 1914 it was proposed that Union Road should be renamed Alexandra Road but the proposal was not adopted. Queen Alexandra, consort to Edward VII.

Alexandrina Place. 1841. This was the first name of Queen Victoria. The corner of the Parade and Dormer Place was briefly referred to with this name.

Alma Place. 1863. Origin unknown. Off Satchwell Street.

Almond Avenue. Name agreed 1937. 51 houses. First house dates from about 1951 and built in several phases. Named for the trees planted in the verges. Off Cloister Crofts.

Althorpe Street. Laid out in 1828. Initially about 42 houses. Presently about 82 business addresses. Possibly named for a daughter of Mrs Acklom at the manor house who married Viscount Althorpe in 1814. Slums demolished in 1957. Off High Street.

Alveston Place. 1838. 18 addresses. Place near Stratford upon Avon. Off Oxford Street.

Ambassador Court. 36 flats replaced Nos 42-44 Kenilworth Road in 1976. Origin unclear. 

Amroth Mews. About 1964 to 1968. 20 homes. Beach and bay in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Ancaster Road. 1961. Possibly for the Earl of Ancaster. Off Beverley Road. In 1962 the residents voted to rename the street as The Fairways in memory of the golf course on the site at one time.

Arbenie Crescent. 1836. Possibly a family name. There was a plan for a curved terrace of houses on the west side of Clarendon Place designed by W Startin. Only the houses at each end were eventually built. The existing five houses were later built in 1886.

Arbury Close. 1974. 4 houses. Place name near Nuneaton. Off Belmont Drive, Park Road.

Archery Ground. About 1834. At the east end of what became Jephson Gardens; known as Newbold Archery Ground. Owned by Willes of Newbold Comyn.

Archery Place. About 1850. Named for the use of nearby land for archery. This was briefly the name used for Victoria Street to avoid confusion with Victoria Road.

Archery Road. Named in 1873. 19 houses and a pub, The Cricketers. The pub moved from Victoria Street in DATE. The earlier name was Cricket Street. Named for the use of nearby land for archery; now internationally known bowling greens. Off Adelaide Road.

Arden Close. 1952. 26 homes. Named for the northern part of Warwickshire, one-time site of the Forest of Arden. The corresponding southern part of the county is Feldon. Off Henley Road and St Margaret’s Road.

Arley Mews. 1905. 4 addresses. Arley is a village in north Warwickshire. Initially named as a Mews Road for Rugby Road and Heath Terrace.

Arlington Avenue. 1937. 195 addresses including blocks of flats etc. Place in East Sussex or a noble title for a person. The street was named Arlington Street until 1937. Off Beauchamp Avenue.

Arlington Court. 2017. Either named for a place in East Sussex or a titled person. 52 flats built on the site of a previous block at about Nos 15 to 19 Arlington Avenue.

Arlington Mews. 1890. About 4 houses. Place in East Sussex or a titled person. Access to coaches and stables at the rear of houses in Lillington Road and Lillington Avenue. Off Arlington Avenue.

Arlington Street. 1830. Place in East Sussex or titled person. The early name for what became Arlington Avenue in 1937. There was a significant gap in the street for many years and the northern part was named Upper Arlington Street.

Arno Close. 1958. Probably from the Arno river in Italy, site of a battle in 1944. This name was agreed in 1958 but its location has not yet been traced

Arnos Cottages. Before 1961. Origin probably a person’s name, ie Arno’s. Permission was granted to demolish cottages with this name at Nos 1-3 in Innage Close in 1961. Innage Close is off Willes Road.

Ascot Ride. 1972. 14 houses. Origin horse racing. Stud Farm. Off Valley Road

Ashgrove Place. 1846. Probably named for a grove of ash trees. Off Althorpe Street near the ladder bridge. Slums demolished before 1960.

Ashton Court. About 1961. 46 flats. Arthur Ashton, mayor in 1942. Newland Road.

Astley Place. 1961. 14 addresses. Possibly named for the village or castle in north Warwickshire. Off The Fairways.

Atkinson Road. Planning application in 1980. Origin not found. Location not found. Speculation that name was changed before completion.

Augusta Place. 1827. 72 addresses including a variety of homes and businesses. Probably named for Princess Augusta, daughter of King George III. Portland Place East to Regent Street. St Peter’s Junior School in the street; part of it was a convent built about 1850.

Avenue Road. 1740. 328 addresses. The name and geography dates from the Wise family building a house and naming the two access roads as Upper and Lower Avenue. The later public road which crossed Upper and Lower Avenue was named Avenue Road. The house was named Manor House although the Lord of the Manor did not own it or live there. The part leading to Bath Street was later named Spencer Street; in 2019 Spencer Street runs for Lower Avenue to Bath Street; on maps around 1900 Spencer Street went as far as Station Approach. See also Harriet Street.

Avenue Walk. 1850. Origin see Avenue Road. Avenue Walk was the original Upper Avenue entrance to the Manor House which was lost when the railways were built.

Avon Court. 1973. Named for the River Avon. 28 flats at No 51 Kenilworth Road.

Avondale Road. 1927. 20 houses. Named for the River Avon. Referred to as road No 12 in the development of Manor Farm. Off Lonsdale Road.

Avonlea Rise. 1982. 26 houses. Named for the River Avon. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Aylesford Street. 1808. 34 addresses. Named for the Earl of Aylesford who was the Lord of the Manor and probably still is. It was initially named Regent Street but this name was transferred to what was Cross Street in 1818. Off Brunswick Street.

The Streets of Leamington beginning with B

Baddesley Close. About 1986 to 1990. 12 addresses. Named either for Baddesley Clinton House or the place in north Warwickshire. More likely to be the former because other streets on this part of the estate are named after local large houses. Off Coughton Drive, Sydenham.

Badgers Retreat. About 1998 to 2002. 28 addresses. Evokes memories of the countryside and refers to the animals which were formerly reputed to be seen in the area. An earlier proposal was the name Badgers Bushes. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Baker Avenue. 1922. 31 addresses. Uncertain, named either for local artist Thomas Baker or Alderman Charles Baker. Beech Avenue was initially agreed as the name. Part of first estate of council houses, off Tachbrook Road.

Baldwyn Close. 1980. Unknown origin. Mentioned in council minutes in 1980 but not yet traced, name probably not used.

Bamburgh Grove. 1992. 16 addresses. Bamburgh Castle is in Northumberland, the county is now named Northumbria. Appropriate because it is off Northumberland Road.

Bank Croft. About 1982 to 1986. 19 addresses. Uncertain origin, possibly a reference to a topographical feature. Off Moncrieff Drive, Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Bankfield Drive. 1971. 21 addresses. Uncertain origin. Riversleigh Drive, Old Milverton Road.

Bannister’s Court. Before 1842. Probably named for the landlord. A court off Kenilworth Street. Demolished as a slum about 1932.

Barley Court. 1986. 15 addresses. On site of the brewery where barley was a key ingredient. The Maltings, Lillington Avenue.

Barnard Close. 1974. 14 addresses. Uncertain origin. The Crest, Lillington.

Barratt Court. See Barratt Place.

Barratt Place. 1863. Barratt was probably the landlord. Initially named Barratt Court but changed to ‘Place’ at the request of residents. Rugby Road, demolished and replaced by Stamford Gardens about 1961.

Barton Crescent. About 1970 to 1975. 56 addresses. Origin uncertain, possibly named for the village near Bidford-on-Avon. Off Ledbury Road, Sydenham.

Barwell Close. 1953. 8 addresses. Possibly named for an iron-founder in business in the town in 1833. Off Woodcote Road.

Bath Lane. Before 1783. The street passed the Original Well. Renamed Bath Street before 1833. Ran from High Street to river bridge.

Bath Place. Before 1819. 40 addresses. Near to the Original Well and Abbotts’ Baths. Off High Street parallel to Bath Street. Site of an early market. Emperors restaurant Listed Grade II.

Bath Street. Existed before 1783, renamed from Bath Lane before 1833. 101 addresses. Street passed the Original Well. Runs from High Street to the river bridge. The west side opposite to the parish church is known as Victoria Terrace.

Baxter Court. Agreed 1986. 26 addresses. Probably named for Edgar Alfred Baxter who was Mayor in 1955 to 1956. Off Camberwell Terrace.

Beaconsfield Street. 1879. 39 addresses. Probably named in memory of Benjamin Disraeli, appointed first Earl of Beaconsfield, Prime Minister 1868 and 1874. Place in Buckinghamshire. Off Leam Terrace.

Beaty’s Gardens. After 2000. 5 addresses. This was the site of a plant nursery run by Mr Graham Beaty. Lillington Road.

Beauchamp Avenue. 1830. 94 addresses. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. From Clarendon Street to Clarendon Square. Earlier name was Beauchamp Terrace (qv) until about 1879.

Beauchamp Hill. 1836. 50 addresses. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. From Clarendon Square to Union Road. The section from Clarendon Square to The Dell was earlier named Beauchamp Street. Nos 19 and 20, Beauchamp House and Milverton House are Listed Grade II.

Beauchamp Mews. About 1988. 4 addresses. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. Morrell Street

Beauchamp Road. About 1834. 2 addresses. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. It was the west side of Beauchamp Square. Runs from Binswood Avenue to Clarendon Avenue.

Beauchamp Square. 1820 to 1830. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. Bounded by Kenilworth Road, Clarendon Avenue, Beauchamp Road and Beauchamp Avenue. Early name for what became Christ Church Gardens (qv). Design by PF Robinson but never completed.

Beauchamp Street. 1834.  Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. From Clarendon Square to The Dell. Later renamed as part of Beauchamp Hill.

Beauchamp Terrace. 1830. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. Early name for Beauchamp Avenue (qv) until about 1879; parts either side ok what became Kenilworth Road were referred to as East and West.

Beaulieu Park. About 1986 to 1990. 16 addresses. Named for Beaulieu Palace in Hampshire. Off Marlborough Drive, Sydenham.

Beaumont Court. 1973. 6 addresses. Name of the first Earl of Warwick created in Norman times from 1088. Council houses built in Aylesford Street.

Beavers Brook Close. About 1998 to 2002. 20 addresses. Fanciful country name; near to Rad Brook; reputed to be home of beavers at one time. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Bedford Place. 1834. Dukes of Bedford who first visited baths around 1810. It is off Bedford Street at the back of buildings in Dormer Place. Several Listed Grade II buildings in Dormer Place back on to this street.

Bedford Street. 1808. 84 addresses. Dukes of Bedford who visited baths around 1810. Initially named Frost Street for a local landowner. From Dormer Place to Warwick Street. The Lawn Tennis Court Club building adjacent to No 50 is Listed Grade II*. Nos 40 and 42 are Listed Grade II.

Beech House. About 2002. Named for the tree. Part of Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Bell Court. 1986. 17 addresses. Possibly name from a bell tower on the site. On site of old brewery in Lillington Avenue.

Belle View Place 01. At least three streets have carried this name. The origin is clearly from the French meaning “nice view”. Before 1886. A court at the rear of No 19 Kenilworth Street. Demolished.  It is questionable whether the street deserved the title “nice view”.

Belle View Place 02. 1817. The origin is clearly from the French meaning “nice view”. Off Ranelagh Terrace. Built by James Bisset and used as home and gallery. It is questionable whether the street deserved the title “nice view”.

Belle View Place 03. Before 1864. The origin is clearly from the French meaning “nice view”. Rugby Road. It is questionable whether the street deserved the title “nice view”.

Belmont Court. Before 1974. A mellifluous name with many French connections dating back to 1066. Flats in Park Road.

Belmont Drive. 1974. 8 addresses. A mellifluous name with many French connections dating back to 1066. Off Park Road.

Belmont Mews. 1978. 4 addresses. A mellifluous name with many French connections dating back to 1066. Off Park Road.

Bentley Close. 1958. 22 addresses.  Possibly named for a place near Nuneaton. Newnham Road, Lillington.

Berenska Drive. After 1986. 29 addresses. Jan Berenska led the musical group named the Royal Spa Quartet about 1941. Heemstede Lane, Lillington.

Berrington Road. After 1973. 25 business addresses. Possibly named for a place in Shropshire or Northumbria. Off Sydenham Drive.

Bertie Circus. 1830. A given name for Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, landowner. Only one or two buildings were built and the circus was not completed. Location off Warwick Road, now Warwick Place.

Bertie Road. 1829. Given name of Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, landowner. Early name for Warwick Place.

Bertie Terrace. 1829. 35 addresses. Given name of Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, landowner. A terrace behind a service road on Warwick Place.

Beverley Hills estate. 1962. Charles Greatheed Bertie Percy of Guys Cliffe House was the eighth son of the Earl of Beverley. Estate off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Beverley Road. Named 1925 and first houses built; modern houses were built from about 1960. 119 addresses. Charles Greatheed Bertie Percy of Guys Cliffe House was the eighth son of the Earl of Beverley. From Northumberland Road to Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Binswood Avenue. 1827 to 1831. 212 addresses. Initially named Binswood Terrace, East and West, until about 1850. Named for Bins Brook which was at the west end of the street. From Binswood Street traffic island to Lillington Road, crossing Kenilworth Road.

Binswood Crescent. 1827. Named for Bins Brook. The part of the west part of Binswood Avenue on the north side which curves away from the street with Binswood Hall at the centre.

Binswood Place. 1825. Named for Bins Brook. Location uncertain, but possibly an early name for that northern part of Clarendon Place which became Binswood Street.

Binswood Square. About 1834. Possibly an early name for Beauchamp Square (or used in error) which is now Christchurch Gardens. Named for Bins Brook.

Binswood Street. Built 1832; named after 1881. 41 addresses. Originally named Clarendon Place and then possibly Binswood Place. Named for Bins Brook. From Clarendon Square to Rugby Road traffic island.

Binswood Terrace, East and West. 1827. Original names for Binswood Avenue before 1850. Named for Bins Brook.

Birchway Close. 1972. 12 addresses. After Stanley William Thomas Birch, mayor 1971 to 1972. Off Riversleigh Road.

Bisset Crescent. About 1978 to 1982. 10 addresses. Named for James Bisset, entrepreneur, owner of galleries around 1820. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Black Lane. Possibly named about 1960; it existed long before this. In 1818 it was known as a ‘Lovers Lane’. 6 addresses. Named for the black cinder topping in the 1960s. Off Gresham Avenue.

Bladon Walk. About 1970 to 1975. 12 addresses. Named for the location of the grave of Winston Churchill in Oxfordshire. Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Blakelands Avenue. About 1968 to 1970. 22 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Blandford Road. 1971. 9 addresses. Named for the Duke of Marlborough who was Earl of Blandford or for Blandford Forum which is a place in Dorset. Off Riversleigh Road.

Blenheim Crescent. About 1982 to 1986. 21 addresses. Named for the scene of the battle of Blenheim in 1704; Blenheim Palace was the house of the Duke of Marlborough; also the house where Winston Churchill was born. Off Cobden Avenue. Sydenham.

Blenheim Place. 1822. Named for scene of battle in 1704 or Blenheim Palace (which was named for the battle). Oxford Hotel in Clemens Street became Blenheim Hotel after the Duke of Marlborough stayed in 1822; it became part of Stoneleigh Hotel.

Bonniksen Close. 1986. 20 addresses. Named for the owner of airfield in Harbury Lane (not in Leamington). Off Brakesmead.

Booth’s Terrace. 1818. Named for the owner and builder. In Clemens Street.

Bordesley Court. 1979. 4 addresses. Place in Birmingham. Off Lillington Road. Based on the house called Brampton where Alexander Marshall Lodge, 1882-1938, maker of spark plugs, lived.

Borrowdale Drive. 1964. 21 addresses. Named for a place in the Lake District. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Bourton Drive. 1951. 25 addresses. Named for Bourton-on-Dunsmore near Rugby. Off Lawford Road.

Bowers Croft. 1975. 5 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Lillington Road.

Braemar Road. 1938. 72 addresses. Scottish name refers to landowner, Mr Mc Gregor. Off Melton Road.

Brakesmead. 1989. 34 addresses. Built on the site of the football ground of the factory of Lockheed Brakes nearby; the team was, and is, called “The Brakes”. Off Culworth Close, Tachbrook Road.

Brandon Parade. 1833. Possibly named for the village near Coventry. Part of Holly Walk.

Brewery Lane. 1859. Named for the Leamington Brewery in Lillington Avenue. Location possibly part of Lillington Avenue or a lane leading off to the brewery.

Brewery Terrace. Before 1852. A terrace built on the site of an early brewery in the town. In Wise Street. Demolished.

Briar Close. 1950. 58 addresses. Named for the bramble or blackberry bush. Off Haddon Road.

Briar Gardens. 2003 DATE. 10 addresses. Named for the bramble or blackberry bush. At the end of Briar Close.

Bridge Street. 1827. Briefly used as the name for Newbold Road which became Willes Road. Named for the bridge over the River Leam in Willes Road.

Broadhaven Close. About 1964 to 1968. 12 addresses. Place in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Brook Street. 1826. After demolition it was renamed New Brook Street. Named for Bins Brook which flowed to the west of the street. Warwick Street to Regent Street.

Brookhurst Court. DATE Before 2005. 42 addresses. Origin unknown. Beverley Road.

Brooklands House. About 1870. Converted about 2002. Origin unknown. Part of Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Brownlow Street. 1904. 29 addresses. Brownlow Bertie was the uncle of Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House. Off Campion Road.

Brown’s Buildings. Before 1903. Possibly named for the owner. Leam Terrace East.

Brunswick Court. DATE. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. Brunswick Street.

Brunswick Place. Before 1887. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. This was on the site of what is now Christine Ledger Square.

Brunswick Street. Began about 1813 and extended to the town boundary about 1850. 414 addresses. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. End on connection to Clemens Street at the canal bridge.

Brunswick Terrace. Before 1852. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. Corner of Brunswick Street and Aylesford Street.

Buchanan Street. 1834. About 9 houses. Origin unknown. From Court Street to Althorpe Street. Demolished.

Buckley Road. 1945; began as early site of prefabricated homes in World War II. 207 addresses. Named for WH Buckley, manager of the waterworks in Campion Terrace. From Gresham Avenue to Mason Avenue.

Burbury Close. 1959. 29 addresses. Origin unknown; possibly one of several places or people named Burbury. Off Mason Avenue.

Burbury’s Court. 1849. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished.

Burford Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 10 addresses. Named for the town in the Cotswolds. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Burman Close. 2006. 12 addresses. Possibly named for Burman of Burman and Brewster, corn merchants in town in New Street. Off Lillington Road.

Burns Road. 1938. 33 addresses. Probably named for Robert Burns, poet; Scottish connection to McGregor, landowner. Off Kinross Road.

Bury Road. 1930. 110 addresses. Dr RF Bury was the mayor in 1929, 1930 and 1931. Off Tachbrook Road, Shrubland estate.