The Streets of Leamington beginning with H

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Haddon Road. 1952. 85 addresses. John Haddon was a partner in the Leamington Brewery in Lillington Avenue, 1840 until death in 1875; he lived at Eastnor House in Radford Road just beyond Leam Terrace East. Off Buckley Road.

Hadrian Close. About 1935. 30 addresses. Several streets on this estate have names with links to Scotland. Off Kinross Road.

Hall Road. Known simply as the mews road for the east side of Clarendon Square from 1834; some stables later converted to dwellings; renamed before 1927. 12 addresses. Name possibly related to nearby Beauchamp Hall on the corner with Beauchamp Avenue; now Kingsley School. Off Clarendon Avenue.

Hamilton Crescent. 1834. Possibly named for Duke of Hamilton. The street was described as Crescent until about 1848 when it became Hamilton Terrace. From the Parade.

Hamilton Terrace. 1834. 21 addresses. Possibly named for the Duke of Hamilton. The street was described as Hamilton Crescent until about 1848 when it became Terrace. Off the Parade.
It was the location of one of the first dispensaries in the town around 1886.
It has been the site of the divisional Police Station since 1968 but the entrance is now in Newbold Terrace. Police moved from the HQ in High Street which had been the Town Hall.

Hamm Way. Marked on map 1711 leading from the eastern end of Lillington Avenue towards Offchurch. Origin unknown. No longer exists in 2019.

Hampton Court. Before 1878; demolished 1959. Possibly named for the owner of the court. Off Park Street.

Hampton Grove. New street created about 1977 after the demolition of Hampton Street. 13 addresses. Possibly related to the royal palace Hampton Court. Off Comyn Street.

Hampton Street. 1866. About 28 houses in the original build. Demolished in phases from 1960 to 1970 and replaced by Hampton Grove. Name possibly related to the royal palace of Hampton Court. Off Comyn Street.

Hanover Gardens. Apartments built about 1960 on site of No 76 Upper Holly Walk which was originally built about 1832. 21 addresses. Origin unknown; Hanover is the capital city of Lower Saxony in Germany.

Hanworth Close. DATE. 1953. 41 addresses. Possibly village in Norfolk. Off Thursfield Road.

Harriet Street. Before 1835. Origin unknown; probably the wife of Matthew Wise. Off Bath Street. There is speculation that Harriet Street was the name for the street shown leaving Bath Street opposite Church Walk in a north-westerly direction on maps of 1783 and 1814 (note that it did not follow the present route of Spencer Street); this may be linked to the story of the diagonal row of buildings across Spencer Yard which has not been resolved.

Harrison Way. 2005. 4 business addresses. Origin unknown. Off Tachbrook Road.

Harvest Hill Close. About 1970 to 1975. 16 addresses. Origin unknown, possibly named for a local feature. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Haseley Close. 1953. 27 addresses. Village near Warwick; an alternative suggestion of origin is Haseley End. Off Redland Road.

Hastang Fields. About 1998 to 2002. 25 addresses. Named for an Anglo Saxon ruler and one-time Lord of the Manor of Whitnash. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Hawkes Cottages. XXXX

Hawthorn Road. 1925. 14 addresses. Origin unknown; the initial proposal was to name it Back Road. Off Baker Avenue. Part of the second estate of council houses for the town.

Hazel Close. 1973. 17 addresses. Origin possibly for a local plant. Off Campion Road.

Heath Terrace. Named in 1863. 99 addresses. The street was built on an extensive area of uncultivated heathland. Off Union Road.
St Saviour’s Church built in 1871.

Heemstede Lane. 1987. 9 addresses. Named for a twin town in The Netherlands. Off Lillington Road.

Hellidon Close. 1984. 14 addresses. Village nearest to the source of the River Leam in Northamptonshire. Off Napton Drive.

Helmsdale Road. Adopted 1957. 50 addresses. One of several streets named with Scottish connections relevant to the McGregors; Helmsdale is a village on the east coast of Sutherland. Off St Andrews Road.

Henley Road. 1851. 53 addresses. Possibly named for Henley-in-Arden. Off St Margaret’s Road.

Henry Place. XXXX

Henry Tandey Court. 1977-1978. 12 addresses. Named for Henry Tandey who was the most decorated private soldier in the First World War and was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions. Union Road.

Henry’s Row. Before 1847; probably demolished as early as 1933. Possibly named for the owner of the court. A court behind No 8 Satchwell Street.

Herbert Place. XXXX

Herbert’s Court. Before 1844. Possibly named for the owner of the Court. Off Lower Bedford Street along the rear of Regent Street buildings.

Hewitt’s Buildings. 1863. Probably named for the owner of the Court. A court in Oxford Row, off Oxford Street.

Hewitt’s Cottages. Demolished about 1959. Probably named for the owner of the Cottages. Off Hill Street.

Hewitt’s Place. Present in 1852; later renamed Hampton Court. Probably named for the owner of the Court. A court in Park Street.

Hidcote Close. 1986 to 1990. 20 addresses. A village in Gloucestershire, and Hidcote Bartrim is a National Trust garden, in Gloucestershire. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

High Street. This was a main road many centuries ago and became part of the Warwick-Northampton Turnpike in 1763 (this expired in 1871). It was earlier named as London Road and then Turnpike (Road) but the name High Street became usual around 1815. 122 addresses. High Street is a widespread name for a principal street in a community. The length of High Street has varied; the name may have been used for the full length from Tachbrook Road to the junction with Willes Road for a time. More recently it became Radford Road at the junction with Forfield Place and then from George Street at this present day.
The Town Hall was in the street on the corner of Althorpe Street and a new version opened in 1830; it became the police station when the new town hall opened in 1884. It is now Listed Grade II.
The Crown Hotel had been a vicarage when built in about 1808; it became a hotel in 1814 or 1815 and closed in 1989. It is No 10 and is now Listed Grade II.
The two earliest pubs in the town were in the street; they were the Bowling Green and the Dog (or Black Dog). Sinkers Hotel opened about 1793; it became Copps Hotel in 1814; it was demolished and rebuilt in 1827; this version was demolished with the arrival of the railways in 1847.

The Guards Inn is Listed Grade II.

Highcroft Crescent. 1971. 25 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Riversleigh Road.

Highdown Road. 1975. 13 business addresses. Origin unknown. Off Berrington Road, Sydenham.

Highfield Terrace. 1881. 34 addresses. Origin possibly related to the elevation of the site; initial proposal was Highfield Road. Off Rugby Road.

Highland Road. 1927. 71 addresses. One of several streets in Lillington with names with Scottish connections; connected to the landowner, McGregor. Off Cubbington Road.

Hill Close. Adopted 1957. 9 addresses. This is an elevated site. Off Church Lane, Lillington.

Hill Street (1). Satchwell Street was known by this name before 1810 because it slopes up to the north. It is now the site of the Royal Priors shopping centre. Off Warwick Street.

Hill Street (2). 1863. 35 addresses. Climbs a hill; part of this street was earlier known as Creaking Hill. Off Leicester Street.

Hill’s Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner of the Court. Tachbrook Street. Demolished DATE.

Hirsel Gardens. DATE 1980s. 3 or 4 addresses. Probably built in the garden of a house named Hirsel Lodge; Hirsel is a significant house near Coldstream in Berwickshire. A short row of houses in Woodcote Road.

Hitchman Court. DATE. 27 addresses. Dr John Hitchman established and ran the Hydrotherapy premises nearby in St Helens Road which became the Royal Midland Counties Home. Hitchman Road.

Hitchman Mews. DATE. 24 addresses. Dr John Hitchman established and ran the Hydrotherapy premises nearby in St Helens Road which became the Royal Midland Counties Home. Hitchman Road.

Hitchman Road. 1890. 61 addresses. Until 1903 it was named Vicarage Road for the vicarage of St Johns church. Dr John Hitchman established and ran the Hydrotherapy premises nearby in St Helens Road which became the Royal Midland Counties Home. Off St Helens Road.

Holly Place. Before 1870. Holly Street was initially only to the west of Campion Terrace. When houses were built to the east, the street of five houses was named Holly Place. When more houses were built further to the east they were named Holly Street East. Comyn Street was later built in the gap. About 1906 the whole street was renamed Holly Street and renumbered. The name probably relates to holly trees in Holly Walk and Upper Holly Walk.

Holly Road. 1854. Name relates to holly trees in Holly Walk and Upper Holly Walk. This was the name initially given to that street adjoining Campion Terrace which was later named Princes Street.

Holly Street. 1846. 29 addresses. Name relates to holly trees in Holly Walk and Upper Holly Walk. Crosses Campion Terrace.

Holly Walk. 1818. 73 addresses. Plentiful planting of holly trees; many cut down when houses were built; about half a dozen survive. Off Willes Road. See also Upper Holly Walk.

Holt, The. See The Holt.

Home Close. This was the site of a farmhouse on the corner of Leam Terrace and Mill Street which was also known as Court’s Home Close in the Enclosure award of 1768. The name relates to a farm near to the village centre. It was replaced by Lady Huntingdon’s Chapel, manse and school in 1829 and that was later replaced by Urquhart Hall in 1905.

Hopton Crofts. 1985. 37 addresses. Mrs Hopton was the daughter of Benjamin Satchwell. Satchwell discovered, or helped to discover, the first commercial saline spring in the town which became Abbotts Baths. Note that this street was formally transferred from Old Milverton parish to Leamington in 2015. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Hornbeam Grove, earlier sometimes referred to as Hornbeam Close. About 1970 to 1975. 23 addresses. Named for the tree but no evidence found that it was prevalent in the area. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Horsepool Hollow. About 1998 to 2002. 26 addresses. Earlier sometimes referred to as Horse Pool Meadow. This was an old fieldname in the locality. Also adjacent to the Rad Brook and Holy Well where horses may have stopped to drink. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Howard Place or Howard’s Buildings. Before 1895. Probably used the owner’s name. Oxford Row, Oxford Street. Demolished.

Hurley Close. Before 1973. 12 addresses. Name of a village in North Warwickshire. Off Villiers Street.

Hyde Place. 1879. 36 addresses. There are several possibilities for the origin; a Mr Hyde was a benefactor of Dale Street chapel nearby; also the Earl of Clarendon was formerly Mr Hyde. Off Warwick Place.

The Streets of Leamington beginning with I

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Imperial Place. In 2003 this development replaced several detached houses dating from 1960. About 22 addresses. Origin uncertain other than to sound grand and royal. Lillington Road.

Inglewood Close. 1959. 7 addresses. Origin of name unknown. Off Cubbington Road.

Ingot Drive. 1996. This name was proposed for a development on the site of the Henry Griffiths jewel factory; it was not adopted and the new streets were finally named Sapphire Drive and Emerald Way. Off Queensway.

Innage Close. Named in 1958. One address. Name was suggested by Mr Willes. Origin unknown; the common meaning is the amount of liquid left in a partly-emptied container. Off Willes Road.

Iven’s Court. Name before 1864. About 6 houses. The earlier name was Warwick Court. Probably named for the owner of the Court. Warwick Street. It is now named Warwick Court again. Houses demolished.

The Streets of Leamington beginning with J

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Jenton Road. Before 1975. 9 businesses addresses. Origin unknown. Off Highdown Road, Sydenham.

Jephson Place. 1966. 8 addresses. Named in memory of Dr Henry Jephson, the great, possibly the greatest, supporter of the baths and the spa. On the site of No 79 Willes Road.

Joan’s Close. 1968 to 1970. 5 addresses. Named for Joan, wife of Arthur Tickle, farmer at Sydenham Farm. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

John Cullis Gardens. 2004. 42 addresses. John Cullis was a horticulturalist who designed and ran the Ranelagh Gardens as a public garden and a plant nursery off Brunswick Street from about 1811 to 1847. Site of Nos 58 and 60 Kenilworth Road.

John Street. 1828. 2 addresses. Unknown origin. Off Bedford Street.

John’s Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner of the court. Satchwell Street. Probably demolished in 1950s.

Johnson’s Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner of the Court. Satchwell Street. Probably demolished in 1950s.

Juno Drive. 1966. 4 business addresses. Origin not found. Business premises off Queensway.

The Streets of Leamington beginning with K

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Keir Close. 1988. 51 addresses. Sir John Keir was a councillor in the 1920s and 1930s. Off Berenska Drive.

Keith Road. 1938. 30 addresses. One of several streets with Scottish connections from landowner McGregor. Off Melton Road.

Kelvin Road. 1958. 111 addresses. One of several streets with Scottish connections from landowner McGregor. Off Stirling Avenue.

Kempton Crescent. 1974. 23 addresses. Connection of Kempton racecourse with training of racehorses on the site of Stud Farm. Off Valley Road.

Kendal Avenue. 1964. 7 addresses. One of several streets connected to the Lake District. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Kenilworth Road 01. The first Kenilworth Road later became named Lillington Road; it ran from Cubbington Road to Sandy Lane. The name was changed in 1842 when the street from Lillington Avenue towards Kenilworth was built. This new street was initially referred to as New Kenilworth Road. Both streets were obviously named because they led to Kenilworth. Off Clarendon Avenue to town boundary.

Kenilworth Road 02. 388 addresses. See Kenilworth Road 01 for the story.
Many original houses have been demolished and replaced in the last 20 or 30 years.
Nine houses on the east side of the street are Listed Grade II including the building on the corner of Clarendon Avenue which has variously been the Desmond Hotel and the Berni Royal Hotel.

Kenilworth Street. 1810. 81 addresses. Named for local town. Off Warwick Street. Several courts of houses were connected to the street.
Henry Tandey VC was born at Swain’s Building off this street.
Kinmonds soft drink factory was in the street; it became a wholesale greengrocer and it is included as part of a development of retirement homes called Kinmond Court (see below).

Kennan Avenue. 1931. 74 addresses. John Joseph Kennan (1872-1932), borough engineer. Off Bury Road on the Shrubland estate.

Kennedy Square. 1966. 82 addresses. Probably John Kennedy, President of USA, 1961 to 1963. Off King Street.

Kennett Road. 1935. Kennett is a river in Berkshire and Wiltshire. Suggested name in the area of Northway but not used.

Keswick Green. 1964. 17 addresses. One of several streets named for the Lake District. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Kilby Grove. About 1978 to 1982. 11 addresses. Named for Captain Arthur Kilby (1885-1915) as he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at the Battle of Loos at which he lost his life; his parents lived at Skelton House, Lillington Avenue. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Kiln Close. 1973. 4 addresses. Named for the kilns at the brickworks on the site from about 1830 to about 1955. Off Villiers Street.

King Street. 1836. 7 addresses. In a group of streets with royal or noble names. Off St Pauls Square.

Kingfishers Reach. About 1998 to 2002. 18 addresses. Romantic name and kingfishers are sometimes seen in the area of Rad Brook. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Kingland Drive. 1971. 23 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Riversleigh Road.

King’s Mews. 1808. Early name for the spread of stables on what became Livery Street (Regent Court). On the site of the Regent Hotel which was built 1818. These stables then became part of this new hotel. Probably simply sounded regal and important. The Parade.

Kingston Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 9 addresses. Origin uncertain, it may refer to the town in south-west London. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Kingsway. 1938. 58 addresses. Probably simply sounded regal and important. Off Tachbrook Road.

Kinmond Court. About 1873, converted 1995. 19 addresses. Named for the soft drink manufacturer which used to be on the site. Kenilworth Street.

Kinross Road. 1937. 162 addresses. One of several streets with Scottish connection from landowner McGregor. Lime Avenue.

Knightcote Drive. 1980. 9 addresses. On the site of Knightcote House; Knightcote is a hamlet in south Warwickshire. Off Warwick New Road.