The Streets of Leamington beginning with L

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Lambourn Crescent. About 1975 to 1978. 26 addresses. Name of a centre for the training and care of racehorses in West Berkshire. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Lamintone Drive. 1985. 25 addresses. Uses an old spelling of Leamington. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Langdale Close. 1974. 23 addresses. Possibly named for a place in North Yorkshire. Off The Crest.

Lansdowne Circus. 1836. 23 addresses. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Off Willes Road.
Some of the grandest semi-detached houses in the town. All the houses in the street are Listed Grade II.

Lansdowne Crescent. 1835. 54 addresses. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Willes Road.
Nos 19 to 57 (odds) and the two pairs of gate piers are all Listed Grade II.

Lansdowne Place. 1826. About 16 addresses today. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. East side of the Parade from Warwick Street to Clarendon Avenue. Now part of the Parade (or locally called Upper Parade).
Many of the buildings have refurbished or even have new facades.
Nos 1 to 31 (odds) Parade are all Listed Grade II despite much restoration.

Lansdowne Road. 1866. 15 addresses. Initially a mews road at the rear of the west side of Lansdowne Street or rear of Clarendon Street. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Off Leicester Street.

Lansdowne Street. 1837. 22 Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Off Willes Road.

Lansdowne Terrace. 1820; name disused after 1950. A row of 6 houses on the north side of Willes Road near Clarendon Street. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Willes Road.
Nos 5 to 15 (odds) Willes Road are Listed Grade II.
Blue plaques for Frederick and Elizabeth Whitehead, who were artists, and Corporal William Amey who was awarded the Victoria Cross are at Nos 5 and 13 Willes Road within this terrace.

Lawford Road. 1953. 20 addresses. Villages of Church Lawford and Long Lawford are near Rugby. Off St Margarets Road.

Lawn Terrace. Named Newbold Terrace from when built about 1838; renamed Lawn Terrace about 1868 but after objections this name was soon abandoned. There were about 6 addresses when it was named Lawn Terrace. Overlooked a wide are of grassland above the river, most of which remains. Willes Road.
Nos 26, 27, 34 and 37/38 are Listed Grade II.

Leam Cottages. Before 1904. Location not confirmed; possibly in Myton Road, Warwick. Demolition order 1958. Named for the river.

Leam Crescent. Not yet located. Possibly intended to be at Queensway Business Park at one time.

Leam Place. Named from about 1839 to 1875. Named for the river. A row of houses in Willes Road, possibly near Leam Terrace.

Leamside House. Originally built about 1870, converted in 2002. 9 addresses. Named for the river. Off Lucas Court, off Warwick New Road.

Leam Street. 1834. 30 addresses. Named for the river. Off St Marys Road. See also Lower Leam Street.

Leam Terrace. 1831. 323 addresses including Leam Terrace East. Named for the river. West from Willes Road. See also Leam Terrace East.
About 28 houses and two sewer gas vent pipes on the north side are Listed Grade II. It is unclear whether Leam Terrace East should be named as a separate street; the streets are numbered consecutively.

Leam Terrace East. 1834. 323 addresses including Leam Terrace. Named for the river. East from Willes Road. See also Leam Terrace. It is unclear whether Leam Terrace is the official name; the streets are numbered consecutively.
Four houses near Willes Road are Listed Grade II.

Leam View. Before 1800. Clearly relates to the local river, although it is now clear what view the name relates to. A name seen on a map for the footpath on the west side of the Eagle Recreation Ground. It follows part of the route of the old Watery Lane on a footpath from Whitnash to Lillington.

Ledbury Road. About 1970 to 1975. No addresses because the street simply provides access to other streets. Town in Herefordshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Lee Road. 1936. 59 addresses. Possibly named for a councillor or arch-deacon of the parish church. Off Bury Road, Shrubland estate.

Leicester Court. DATE 1980? 17 addresses. Named for the city or Lord Leicester of Kenilworth Castle. Off Leicester Street.

Leicester Lane. Before 1711. 74 addresses. Named for the city or Lord Leicester of Kenilworth Castle; this street leads in the direction of that city. Extension of Lillington Road.

Leicester Street. Before 1838. 175 addresses. On an early map it is named Victoria Street; the extension up the Campion Hills was indicated on some plans as planned to turn to the south but in the event it turned north about 1945 to lead into Gresham Avenue. Named for the city or for Lord Leicester of Kenilworth Castle. Clarendon Street.
St Pauls church and the adjoining church house and parochial rooms are Listed Grade II.

Leighton Close. 1961. 32 addresses. Origin unknown; possibly a connection to Leighton Buzzard. Off Oakridge Road.

Lillington Avenue. From 1833. 138 addresses. Part of road to Rugby from before 1605 and part of a turnpike from 1818 to 1878. Named because it leads to Lillington. Extension from the Rugby Road to a junction with Lillington Road.
Site of Leamington Brewery from 1839 to about 1970.

Lillington Close. 1939. 40 addresses. Named for the village. Off Church Lane.

Lillington Lane. Before the individual streets were named around 1810 this was the informal name for the route from High Street, Leamington Priors, by way of Bath Lane, what became Regent Grove/Hamilton Terrace, Clarendon Street and Lillington Road to Lillington. Named for the destination village.

Lillington Mews. About 1910. Probably stables for horses. Named for the village. Location not yet identified.

Lillington Place. A map of 1841 marks this as that part of the street from Beauchamp Avenue to Lillington Avenue that is now part of Kenilworth Road which was named in 1842. Named for the village.

Lillington Road. The street from Cubbington Road to Sandy Lane which is now part of Lillington Road was named Kenilworth Road until 1842. 323 addresses. It has not been determined what the name of the street from Clarendon Street to Cubbington Road was before 1842. The length from Clarendon Street all the way to Sandy Lane was certainly named Lillington Road from 1842. Named for the village.
A notable feature is the Centre Oak at the junction with Lillington Avenue.

Lime Avenue. This street provided access to Manor Farm from before 1769. It was laid out as a street and the section to Farm Lane was named from about 1906. 108 addresses. Probably named for local trees. Off Cubbington Road.

Linden Avenue or Walk. This is now the name for the footpath alongside the Pump Room Gardens from the Pump Room up the Parade and along Dormer Place. This path and Dormer Place have had several names including The Mall and The Promenade around 1815. Named for the trees which are also known as limes (but they do not produce the lime fruit).

Linkway. Built about 1968. 2 addresses. This street provided a link from Westlea Road through to Queensway. It is now a cul-de-sac for vehicles. Westlea Road, Shrubland estate.

Littleworth Croft. About 1998 to 2002. 21 addresses. Named for an old fieldname in the vicinity. Earlier suggestion for the name were Littleworth Headland and Littleworth Meadow. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Livery Street. Livery stables near this site from about 1808 were known as King’s Mews. The very short cul-de-sac from Regent Street to the rear of the mews was named as Livery Street from before 1835 when the Queens Cross pub was opened. 103 addresses. Origin from the connection with horses and stables. The stables became an adjunct to the Regent Hotel when it was built and was later servicing motor vehicles under the name Regent Garage. The street opened from the Parade to Regent Street about 2004. It is also known as Regent Court shopping and restaurant area. It is mainly a pedestrian area but there is vehicle access to part of it from Regent Street.
There is access to blocks of flats dating from about 2004 named Regent House, Victoria House, Augusta House, Napoleon House, Leopold House and Edward House. Another block named Wellington House has access from Regent Grove.
It is partly in between the Regent Hotel which is Listed Grade II* and the Town Hall which is Listed Grade II.

Llewellyn Road. Named about 1910. On the site of South Leamington Pleasure Grounds. 61 addresses. According to one source it was named for Rev T Llewellyn but that has not yet been confirmed. Off Brunswick Street.

Lockheed Close. About 1989. Named for the nearby factory and the football team which played on the ground on the site. Off Brakesmead.

London Road (1). Early name for High Street and Radford Road when it was part of the turnpike. This was a main route to London. The name High Street was widely used after 1815 but a reference has been noted of the name London Road as late as 1849 along what is now named Radford Road.

London Road (2). There is one report that this was an early name for Windsor Place. Off Bedford Street.

Longfield Road. About 1975. 25 business addresses. Origin unknown. Street in the business area of Sydenham off Berrington Road.

Longleat Grove. About 1986 to 1990. 17 addresses. Named for a Stately Home in Wiltshire. Calder Walk, Sydenham.

Lonsdale Road. About 1927. 40 addresses. Name possibly relates to Kirkby Lonsdale, now in Cumbria. Off Cubbington Road.

Loveday Drive. 1991. 9 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Fryer Avenue.

Lower Avenue. This was one of the two private drives to the Manor House from Old Warwick Road. It existed before 1783. The Upper Avenue was some way to the west and was destroyed when the railways came. Lower Avenue became a public road before 1838. 17 addresses. The naming is obvious from the point of view of the owner of the house. Now runs from Old Warwick Road/High Street to Spencer Street.

Lower Leam Street. Probably about 1838. 13 addresses. Named for the river. From St Mary’s Road to Leam Terrace; the western extension of Leam Street.
No 1 is Listed Grade II.

Lower Union Parade. An early reference to that part of the Parade from the river to Regent Street. The use of the word Lower is fairly clear but the word Union is less clear. See Parade for a more complete story of the naming.

Lower Villiers Street. About 1850. 3 addresses. Probably recognition of nobility, Villiers was the family name of the Duke of Buckingham. Clarendon Street to Hill Street. See also Villiers Street, which is the extension towards the east.

Loxley Way. About 1979. 19 addresses. Local village near Wellesbourne. Pound Lane to Whitacre Road.

Lucas Court. Original houses before 1870; redevelopment and name from about 2002. On the site of Nos 7, 9, 11, 13 Warwick New Road. No 7 was South Bank. 67 addresses. Possibly named for Eric Lucas who was Mayor from 1956 to 1958 or MP Lucas who was partner in the Leamington Brewery from 1885. A collection of apartment blocks between Warwick New Road and the river. Some of them were already established houses including Brooklands, South Bank and Leamside Houses and others were purpose-built including Beech and Oak Houses.

Lydstep Grove. About 1964 to 1968. 15 addresses. Probably named for Lydstep Haven in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Lyndon Court. About 1983. 5 addresses. Origin unknown. South side of Hyde Place. Rear of No 6 Warwick New Road.

Lynwood Walk. About 1970 to 1975. 9 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

The Streets of Leamington beginning with M

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Mall. About 1808. The early name for Dormer Place or Linden Walk or Avenue. Origin probably to mimic a major street in London. Off Parade.

Maltings, The. See The Maltings.

Manners Place. Before 1837. Probably a court owned by Mr Manners. One record found. Brunswick Street. Demolished DATE.

Manor Court. After 1973, before 1991. Block of apartments built next to the Manor House. 46 addresses. Named for the Manor House which was adjacent to the site. Avenue Road.

Manor Farm estate. Housing began about 1928. Farm belonged with the Lillington Manor House. Farm before 1711. Lime Avenue, Lillington.

Manor Road. About 1900. 44 addresses. Named for Lillington Manor House nearby. From Lime Avenue to Elm Road.

Maple Road. 1922. 16 addresses. Earlier proposal for the name was Maple Avenue. Perhaps named for nearby trees. Baker Avenue.

Marcroft Place. About 1970 to 1975. 2 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Market Corner. About 1923. 10 addresses. Origin unknown other than a chosen name for a block of shops. The north-east corner of Tachbrook Road and Tachbrook Street.

Market Street. Before 1833. Related to the market nearby. Ran from Russell Street to Tavistock Street across Covent Garden Market. Now the site of a multi-storey car park; note that this was not on the site of the existing street which is further south and appears to be an unnamed service road for premises in Warwick Street.

Marlborough Drive. About 1986 to 1990. 62 addresses. Probably named for the Duke of Marlborough or the town in Wiltshire. Off Calder Walk, Sydenham.

Marloes Walk. About 1964 to 1968. 16 addresses. Probably named for a beach in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Marston Close. About 1970, DATE. 24 addresses. Probably named for Priors Marston in Warwickshire. Alongside Black Lane, Lillington at Campion Hill.

Mason Avenue. About 1953. 230 addresses. Origin Dr Harold Mason, Mayor 1910-1911. Off Valley Road, Lillington.

Mathe Croft (or Mathecroft on streetsign). About 1982 to 1986. 19 addresses. Origin was a field name at time of enclosure in 1768. Off Moncrieff Drive, Sydenham.

Mathie Street. Before 1834. Origin was a field name at time of enclosure in 1768. Not located but probably in the Althorpe Street area; possibly demolished for the building of the railways.

Maurice Mead Court. About 1989. 12 addresses. Maurice W Mead was a photographer in the town around 1951. Shrubland Street.

Maxstoke Gardens. 1958. 35 addresses. Maxstoke is a place with a moated castle in north Warwickshire. Tachbrook Road

Mayfield Close. About 1964 to 1968. 12 addresses. Mayfield is a village in East Sussex. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Meadow Close. DATE, before 1973. 29 addresses. Simply named for a field. Off Epsom Road, Lillington.

Melbourne Street. On a map dated 1852. Probably named for the prime minister, Lord Melbourne, about 1835. Early name for what is now Oxford Place, off Oxford Street.

Melford House. Before 1888. Origin unknown. South side of Milverton Hill.

Melton Cottages. DATE. Demolished 1932. Origin unknown, possibly named for the owner. Park Street.

Melton Road. About 1934. 45 addresses. Probably named for the town of Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire. Off Lime Avenue.

Mews Road 01. This was a generic name given to several streets at the rear of significant streets. Originally ‘mews’ were stables or homes for servants; later many were converted to homes or new buildings were built to look like stables. They included Rosefield Street which was at the rear of Newbold Terrace; Hall Road which was at the rear of the eastern part of Clarendon Square; Morrell Street at the rear of Kenilworth Road and Morton Street at the rear of both Beauchamp Avenue and Clarendon Avenue. Only one Mews Road remains with this name, off Guys Cliffe Road; see Mews Road 02. They were each built at the same time as the houses on the relevant street.

Mews Road 02. Probably dates from the building of Warwick Place about 1834. 4 addresses. Simply refers to a service road behind properties on another road although the origin was referring to homes converted from stables. The only surviving mews road with this name is off Guys Cliffe Road. It was a mews road for both Warwick Place and Warwick new Road.

Milford Court. Probably about 1960. 9 addresses. Origin unknown. Mill Road.

Mill End. Mentioned in a rate book of 1813. Presumably related to the mill in Mill Street. Nothing else is currently known.

Mill Gardens. 1898 when the council bought the mill and adjoining land. Named for mill, the last owner was Thomas Oldham. Mill Road.

Mill House Close. 1964.10 addresses. Named for mill at rear on the River Leam. Off Warwick New Road.

Mill House Drive. 1964. 10 addresses. Named for mill at rear on the River Leam. Off Warwick New Road.

Mill House Terrace. 1964. 17 addresses. Named for mill at rear on the River Leam. Off Warwick New Road.

Mill Lane. Early name for Mill Street (see below).

Mill Pond Meadows. About 1998 to 2002. 13 addresses. Reference to the mill on Rad or Radford Brook (now becoming known as Whitnash Brook). Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Mill Road. Before 1834. 34 addresses. Named for the mill which used to be nearby. Initially the mews road at rear of Leam Terrace. Off Willes Road.

Mill Street. Earlier named Mill Lane; before 1783. Renamed about 1875. 8 addresses. Named for the mill nearby. Leam Terrace.

Mill Walk. This earlier formed part of the footpath or drove road from Whitnash to Lillington. The name now refers to the path from Mill Bridge to Newbold Terrace passing bridges beneath paths in the Jephson Gardens. No addresses. Named for the old mill.

Millhouse Close. Proposal which became Mill House Close.

Millhouse Drive. Proposal which became Mill House Drive.

Millhouse Terrace. Proposal which became Mill House Terrace.

Milverton Crescent. 1827. 30 addresses. Named for the village of Old Milverton. Beauchamp Hill to Rugby Road.

Milverton Crescent West. 1837. 26 addresses. Named for the village of Old Milverton. The path along the front doors of the houses is a footpath; access by vehicles is from the road at the rear. Beauchamp Hill to Rugby Road.

Milverton Hill. Before 1835. 51 addresses. Named for the village of Old Milverton. End on meeting with Portland Place West to Warwick New Road. Site of Riverside House, current headquarters of Warwick District Council.

Milverton Lane. The correct name today is Old Milverton Lane. It leads to Old Milverton.

Milverton Terrace. Before 1835. 66 addresses. Named for village of Old Milverton. Church Hill to Warwick Place.

Moncrieff Drive. About 1982 to 1986. 19 addresses. Origin unknown but Moncrief was a demigod in early religion in Scotland. Chesterton Drive to Cobden Avenue.

Montrose Avenue. Initially proposed 1927, built 1954. 95 addresses. Scottish town name for landowner Mr McGregor. Lime Avenue to Telford Avenue.

Morrell Street. Initially a mews road to Kenilworth Road from before 1837. Renamed before 1863. 10 addresses. Named for Moreton Morrell at the suggestion of a retired vicar of that village who lived in Beauchamp Avenue. Clarendon Avenue to Beauchamp Avenue.

Morris Street. 1810. Early name for Windsor Place; renamed about 1847. Named for local landowner John Morris. Bedford Street to Windsor Street.

Morton Street. Initially a mews road to Kenilworth Road from before 1837. Renamed before 1863. 59 addresses. Named for Moreton Morrell at suggestion of a retired vicar of that village who lived in Beauchamp Avenue (note variation of spelling of Morton). Morrell Street to Clarendon Street.

Moss Close. DATE. This was the name of a house in Guys Cliffe Avenue; now part of Cranesthorpe Court. Origin unknown.

Moss Street. Before 1834. Origin unknown. Off Althorpe Street. It has almost disappeared in 2019.

Mosspaul Close. After 1964. 24 addresses. Probably named for a place on the border of Scotland near Hawick. Off Windermere Drive.

Mount Pleasant. 1936. Occasionally used as a name for Campion Hill; possibly to make it sound more appropriate for environmental protection.

Mountford’s Court. Before 1852, demolished about 1927. Probably named for the owner, Mr Mountford. A court off Satchwell Street.

Mulberry Close. 1993. 31 addresses. Named for a variety of tree. Off Whitethorn Drive, near Gresham Place.

Myton Road. Before 1783. 17 addresses. Westward extension of Old Warwick Road. Part of the main road from Warwick to Daventry which became a turnpike. None of the street carriageway is strictly within Leamington but some premises on the north side are within the boundary of Leamington. Named for the hamlet of Myton.