This is a List providing information about most of the Streets of Royal Leamington Spa.

Links to Streets beginning with —
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(The Image at the head of this article is based on maps which are copyright of OpenStreetMap contributors.)

INTRODUCTION.

A general Introduction to the Streets of Leamington is available CLICK HERE.

INTRODUCTION to The List

This list is intended to present information about all the streets in the area of the Town Council of Royal Leamington Spa, which includes Lillington and Milverton, but not the separate town of Whitnash.

A typical entry lists the date of the street, the number of buildings or addresses in the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street.
A street can be found in the list in various ways. Probably the quickest way is to use the Search or Find facility in your browser. Secondly, the section for streets beginning with a particular letter can be found by clicking on the letter in the alphabet that appears occasionally in this page. Finally, it is possible to scroll down the whole list in the usual several ways.

DATES. The dates stated are nearly always approximate and may refer to any of a range of dates including when planning permission was first granted, when the name was agreed, when laying out of the street began, when sewers were laid or the first significant buildings were erected. In some streets buildings were demolished and rebuilt several times; for example, Charlotte Street has housing which was built in seven or eight different decades from the 1820s to the 1980s. There is often uncertainty about dates and also dates when buildings were demolished, such as slum clearances.

NAMES. Origins of names are often not recorded and some detective work and speculation has been required. The initial aim was to establish why a particular name had been chosen as appropriate for Leamington but this has often been impossible to establish.
A very large number of houses had names in the nineteenth century but only the most significant of these are included.

LOCATION of the Streets – A searchable map which shows most of the streets which still exist is –

OpenStreetMapSimply type “Monkey Steps Leamington”, for example, in the search box.

OTHER INFORMATION. Details about key buildings in the streets, such as pubs, banks, public buildings, shops and cinemas may be included. Where relevant the Listing of buildings and location of Blue Plaques are also included.

NOTES. We have been informed that it is the current policy of Warwick District Council not to include apostrophes in street names. This compounds a dilemma with streets named after churches such as St Mary’s Road. Firstly, should the apostrophe be included, and, secondly, should the street be listed as Saint Mary’s Road to appear in true alphabetical order. Consistently we have used the format St Mary’s Road although the apostrophe is not on the street sign.

Some of you may find some of the information overly pedantic but we believe it is useful to have accurate information of this kind on record in one place.

SOURCES
Many sources have been used ranging from early directories and histories of the town and telephone directories and the tortuous records of meetings of local authority planning and other committees. Unfortunately, one frustration is that planning permission for new streets was often given before the street had been named. Of course, books by other authors have been referred to but sadly some information is inconsistent and efforts have been made to confirm it.

A List of Sources appears at the end of this List

REQUEST FOR HELP. It is hoped that you will be able to fill some of the many regrettable gaps or rectify incorrect information. It will be helpful if you can provide the source of the information which you provide. It is often fairly easy to find an origin for a name but the challenge is to find out which one was the inspiration for the particular street and why the name was thought to be appropriate for Leamington.
We have so far checked and incorporated information from 142 responses from people who have reviewed these pages.
If you would like to comment or you can help with information . . .
Please Contact Mick Jeffs, mick263@hotmail.co.uk

Links to Streets beginning with —
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

A

Abbott Street. 1813. 2 addresses. Named for William Abbotts, owner of the first baths and the New Inn (later Bath Hotel, demolished) in Bath Street. Note that the ‘S’ has been lost from the street name and sign at some time. Off Bath Street.
Close to the site of Abbotts’ Baths, which were the first commercial baths opened in 1786.
The corner with Bath Place was the site of an early market in town from about 1813; this was rebuilt about 1841 and named Prince Market by 1848; a shopfront in the street from 1818 is Listed Grade II. Clarke, silversmith, the ‘pencil case man’ was in the street about 1848; the Courier printing works were here from 1855 to 1860; Alexandra Inn was at No 1 from 1861 to 1922; Wackrill’s of Bath Street were in the street from about 1865.

Acacia Road. On maps and named in 1890. 107 addresses. Probably named for this plant which was recorded on the site. Off No 212 Rugby Road.
One streetlamp agreed in 1904; there were sand and gravel pools at the top end in 1916; more houses were built from 1933; Nos 59-65, a block of eight flats, was agreed in 1988.

Acorn Court. 1982. 46 homes. Close to the Centre Oak of which acorn is the seed. A block of homes off Stockton Grove.

Adelaide Road. 1839. About 20 houses; detached on west side and semi-detached on the east. Named for Queen Adelaide, wife of King William IV. Off Avenue Road.
Work on a new bridge over the River Leam was damaged by flood in 1839, it was eventually completed in 1850; the river was straightened in 1859; the bridge was rebuilt of iron within the existing abutments in 1891 by William de Normanville; the bridge is Listed Grade II; three villas were built on the corner of York Road in 1906; the bridge was renovated 1992 to 1994. See Riverside for other development which were sometimes referred to as Adelaide Road.

Aintree Drive. 1972. About 14 houses, of which most are known as French Houses. Racecourse at Liverpool, named for the site on Stud Farm. Off Valley Road.

Albany Terrace. First found on a map in 1854, first house built about 1884. About 24 homes. This was often a title of a junior member of the royal family; it is also a poetic name for Scotland. Off Warwick Place. No 6 was demolished and replaced by three storey houses about 2000. The Dell is behind the houses on the east side; there were fears of instability of the steep bank at times.

Albert Place 01. Before 1850. About 3 houses in this court in 1852. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria. Demolished about 1957. Off Park Street.

Albert Place 02. Before 1866. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, Off Tachbrook Street; precise location not found.

Albert Place 03. Before 1882. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria. Off Leam Terrace East; precise location not found.

Albert Street.  After 1890. About 28 houses. Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria. Off Old Milverton Lane. Possibly an early name was Cemetery Road.

Albion Place. Before 1894. Probably earlier named Swain’s Buildings, 6 houses. Albion is the oldest known name for Great Britain (in Greek). Off Kenilworth Street. Slum clearance after 1953.

Albion Row. 1834. 15 houses. Albion is the oldest known name for Great Britain (in Greek). Off Wise Street, partially alongside the canal.

Albion Terrace. 1852. 6 houses. Albion is the oldest known name for Great Britain (in Greek). Off Althorpe Street, facing the canal.

Alder House. About 2002. About 11 homes. Named for this tree. Apartments at Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Alderton Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 9 homes. Place near Tewkesbury. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Aldwick Close. 1956. 11 houses. Place in West Sussex. Off Lillington Road.

Alexandra Road 01. 1923. 59 addresses. Queen Alexandra, consort to Edward VII. Off Brunswick Street, part of the Rushmore estate. Many houses are Wakerley homes.

Alexandra Road 02. In 1912 it was proposed that Victoria Road should be renamed Alexandra Road but the proposal was not adopted. Queen Alexandra, consort to Edward VII. Off Victoria Street.

Alexandra Road 03. In 1914 it was proposed that Union Road should be renamed Alexandra Road but the proposal was not adopted. Queen Alexandra, consort to Edward VII.

Alexandrina Place. 1841. Alexandrina was the first name of Queen Victoria. The corner of the Parade and Dormer Place was briefly referred to with this name.

Alma Place. 1863. Origin unknown. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Almond Avenue. Name agreed 1937. 51 houses. The first house dates from about 1951 and the street was built in several phases. Named for the trees planted in the verges. Off Cloister Crofts.

Althorpe Street. Laid out in 1828. Initially about 42 houses. Presently about 82 business addresses. Possibly named for a daughter of Mrs Acklom at the manor house who married Viscount Althorpe in 1814. Slums demolished in 1957. In earlier days the word Althorpe was often spelt without the final ‘e’. Off High Street.

Alveston Place. 1838. 18 addresses. Place near Stratford upon Avon. Off Oxford Street.

Ambassador Court. 36 flats replaced Nos 42-44 Kenilworth Road in 1976. Origin unclear. 

Amroth Mews. About 1964 to 1968. 20 homes. Named for a beach and bay in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Ancaster Road. 1961. Possibly named for the Earl of Ancaster. Off Beverley Road. In 1962 the residents voted to rename the street as The Fairways in memory of the golf course on the site at one time.

Anglia Gardens. 2018. 19 addresses. The Anglia was a model of Ford car and Soans garage on the site was a Ford main dealer. New housing built on the site of business premises. Off Soans Drive, off St Marys Road.

Aqua House. About 1996. 12 addresses. Near the site of the waterworks or pumping station in Campion Terrace; Aqua is Latin for water. Now a block of flats in Leicester Street.

Arbenie Crescent. 1836. Possibly a family name. There was a plan for a crescent of houses on the west side of Clarendon Place designed by W Startin. Only the houses at each end, Somerset House and York House, were built. The existing five houses in the gap were built later in 1886.

Arbury Close. 1974. 4 houses. Place name near Nuneaton. Off Belmont Drive, Park Road.

Archery Ground. About 1834. At the east end of what became Jephson Gardens; known as Newbold Archery Ground. Owned by Willes of Newbold Comyn and laid out by J G Jackson, Willes’ land agent.

Archery Place. About 1850. Named for the use of nearby land for archery. This was briefly the name used for Victoria Street to avoid confusion with Victoria Road.

Archery Road. Named in 1873. 19 houses and a pub, The Cricketers; the pub moved from Victoria Street in 1889. The earlier name was Cricket Street. Named for the use of nearby land for archery; now the site internationally known bowling greens. Off Adelaide Road.
There is a Plaque for John Wisden, cricketer and almanac compiler at the Cricketers Arms.

Arden Close. 1952. 26 homes. Named for the northern part of Warwickshire, one-time site of the Forest of Arden. The corresponding southern part of the county is Feldon. Off Henley Road and St Margaret’s Road.

Arley Mews. 1905. 4 addresses. Arley is a village in north Warwickshire. Initially named as a Mews Road for Rugby Road and Heath Terrace.

Arlington Avenue. 1937. 195 addresses including blocks of flats etc. Place in East Sussex or a noble title for a person. The street was named Arlington Street until 1937. Off Beauchamp Avenue.

Arlington Lodge. Name agreed in 2014, opened in about 2017. Either named for a place in East Sussex or a titled person. 52 flats built on the site after demolition of a previous block named Parmiter House at Nos 15 to 19 Arlington Avenue.

Arlington Mews. 1890. About 4 houses. Place in East Sussex or a titled person. Initially provided access to coaches and stables at the rear of houses in Lillington Road and Lillington Avenue. Off Arlington Avenue.

Arlington Street. 1830. Place in East Sussex or a titled person. This was the early name for what became Arlington Avenue in 1937. There was a significant gap in the street for many years and the northern part was named Upper Arlington Street.

Arno Close. 1958. Probably from the Arno river in Italy, site of a battle in 1944. This name was agreed in 1958 but its location has not yet been traced.

Arnos Cottages. Before 1961. Origin probably a person’s name, ie Arno’s. Permission was granted to demolish cottages with this name at Nos 1-3 in Innage Close in 1961. Innage Close is off Willes Road.

Ascot Ride. 1972. 14 houses. Origin horse racing. Stud Farm. Off Valley Road

Ashgrove Place. 1846. Probably named for a grove of ash trees. Off Althorpe Street near the ladder bridge. Slums demolished before 1960.

Ashton Court. About 1961. 46 flats. Arthur Ashton, mayor in 1942. Newland Road.

Astley Place. 1961. 14 addresses. Possibly named for the village or castle in north Warwickshire. Off The Fairways.

Atkinson Road. Planning application in 1980. Origin not found. Location not found. Speculation that name was changed before completion.

Augusta Place. 1827. 72 addresses including a variety of homes and businesses. Probably named for Princess Augusta, daughter of King George III. Portland Place East to Regent Street. St Peter’s Junior School in the street; part of it was a convent built about 1850.
Windsor Cottage, one time convent and now part of St Peter’s School, and No 22 are both Listed Grade II.

Avenue Road. 1740. 328 addresses. The name and geography dates from the Wise family building a house and naming the two access roads as Upper and Lower Avenue. The later public road which crossed Upper and Lower Avenue was named Avenue Road. The house was named Manor House although the Lord of the Manor did not own it or live there. The part leading to Bath Street was later named Spencer Street; in 2019 Spencer Street runs for Lower Avenue to Bath Street; on maps around 1900 Spencer Street went as far as Station Approach. See also Harriet Street.
A Blue Plaque for JBA Perera, lawn tennis pioneer with Major Harry Gem, is on No 33.
Nos 12 to 26 (evens) and the old Library are Listed Grade II.

Avenue Walk. 1850. Origin see Avenue Road. Avenue Walk was the original Upper Avenue entrance to the Manor House which was lost when the railways were built.

Avon Court. 1973. Named for the River Avon. 28 flats at No 51 Kenilworth Road.

Avondale Road. 1927. 20 houses. Named for the River Avon. Referred to as road No 12 in the development of Manor Farm. Off Lonsdale Road.

Avonlea Rise. 1982. 26 houses. Named for the River Avon. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Aylesford Street. 1808. 34 addresses. Named for the Earl of Aylesford who was the Lord of the Manor and probably still is. It was initially named Regent Street but this name was transferred to what was Cross Street at the time in 1818. Off Brunswick Street.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

B

Baddesley Close. About 1986 to 1990. 12 addresses. Named either for Baddesley Clinton House or the place in north Warwickshire. More likely to be the former because other streets on this part of the estate are named after local large houses; chosen by developer, A C Llyd Off Coughton Drive, Sydenham.

Badgers Retreat. About 1998 to 2002. 28 addresses. Evokes memories of the countryside and refers to the animals which were formerly reputed to be seen in the area. An earlier proposal was the name Badgers Bushes. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Baker Avenue. 1922. 31 addresses. Probably named for Alderman Charles Baker. Beech Avenue was initially agreed as the name. Part of first estate of council houses, off Tachbrook Road.

Baldwyn Close. 1980. Unknown origin. Mentioned in council minutes in 1980 but not yet traced, name probably not used.

Bamburgh Grove. 1992. 16 addresses. Bamburgh Castle is in Northumberland, the county is now named Northumbria. Appropriate because it is off Northumberland Road.

Bank Croft. About 1982 to 1986. 19 addresses. Uncertain origin, possibly a reference to a topographical feature. Off Moncrieff Drive, Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Bankfield Drive. 1971. 21 addresses. Uncertain origin. Riversleigh Drive, Old Milverton Road.

Bannister’s Court. Before 1842. Probably named for the landlord. A court off Kenilworth Street. Demolished as a slum about 1932.

Barley Court. 1986. 15 addresses. On site of the brewery where barley was a key ingredient. The Maltings, Lillington Avenue.

Barnard Close. 1974. 14 addresses. Uncertain origin. The Crest, Lillington.

Barratt Court. See Barratt Place.

Barratt Place. 1863. Barratt was probably the landlord. Initially named Barratt Court but changed to ‘Place’ at the request of residents. Rugby Road, demolished and replaced by Stamford Gardens about 1961.

Barton Crescent. About 1970 to 1975. 56 addresses. Origin uncertain, possibly named for the village near Bidford-on-Avon. Off Ledbury Road, Sydenham.

Barwell Close. 1953. 8 addresses. Possibly named for an iron-founder in business in the town in 1833. Off Woodcote Road.

Bath Lane. Before 1783. The street passed the Original Well. Renamed Bath Street before 1833. Ran from High Street to river bridge.

Bath Place. Before 1819. 40 addresses. Near to the Original Well and Abbotts’ Baths. Off High Street parallel to Bath Street; it originally ran for just the short distance from Smith Street to Abbotts Street. Site of an early market. The Emperors restaurant is Listed Grade II.

Bath Street. Existed before 1783, renamed from Bath Lane before 1833. 101 addresses. Street passed the Original Well. Runs from High Street to the river bridge. The west side opposite to the parish church is known as Victoria Terrace.
The following are Listed Grade II – Odds, The Old Library pub, Nos 29 to 33, Nos 35 to 49; Evens, Nos 30, 42, 56 to 64, Waterloo House and The Parthenon.
There is a Blue Plaque for Sir Bernard Spilsbury, pioneer of forensic medicine, at No 35.

Baxter Court. Agreed 1986. 26 addresses. Probably named for Edgar Alfred Baxter who was Mayor in 1955 to 1956. Off Camberwell Terrace.

Beaconsfield Street. 1879. 39 addresses. Probably named in memory of Benjamin Disraeli, appointed first Earl of Beaconsfield, Prime Minister 1868 and 1874. Place in Buckinghamshire. Off Leam Terrace.

Beaty’s Gardens. After 2000. 5 addresses. This was the site of a plant nursery run by Mr Graham Beaty; it is named as Lillington Nursery on a map dated 1881. Lillington Road.

Beauchamp Avenue. 1830. 94 addresses. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. From Clarendon Street to Clarendon Square. Earlier name was Beauchamp Terrace (qv) until about 1879.
The following are Listed Grade II – Odds, No 1, Holy Trinity Church, Nos 27 to 41, 47, 49 and 65.

Beauchamp Hill. 1836. 50 addresses. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. From Clarendon Square to Union Road. The section from Clarendon Square to The Dell was earlier named Beauchamp Street. Nos 19 and 20, Beauchamp House and Milverton House are Listed Grade II.

Beauchamp Mews. About 1988. 4 addresses. The family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. Morrell Street.

Beauchamp Road. About 1834. 2 addresses. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. It was the west side of Beauchamp Square. Runs from Binswood Avenue to Clarendon Avenue.

Beauchamp Square. 1820 to 1830. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. Bounded by Kenilworth Road, Clarendon Avenue, Beauchamp Road and Beauchamp Avenue. Early name for what became Christ Church Gardens (qv). Design by PF Robinson but never completed.

Beauchamp Street. 1834.  Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. From Clarendon Square to The Dell. Later renamed as part of Beauchamp Hill.

Beauchamp Terrace. 1830. Family name of some Earls of Warwick from about 1267 to 1449. See Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary’s Church, Warwick. Early name for Beauchamp Avenue (qv) until about 1879; parts either side of what became Kenilworth Road were referred to as East and West.

Beaulieu Park. About 1986 to 1990. 16 addresses. Named for Beaulieu Palace in Hampshire. Off Marlborough Drive, Sydenham.

Beaumont Court. 1973. 6 addresses. Name of the first Earl of Warwick created in Norman times from 1088. Council houses built in Aylesford Street.

Beavers Brook Close. About 1998 to 2002. 20 addresses. Fanciful country name; near to Rad Brook; reputed to be home of beavers at one time. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Bedford Place. 1834. Dukes of Bedford who first visited baths around 1810. It is off Bedford Street at the back of buildings in Dormer Place. Several Listed Grade II buildings in Dormer Place back on to this street.

Bedford Street. 1808. 84 addresses. Dukes of Bedford who visited baths around 1810. Initially named Frost Street for a local landowner. From Dormer Place to Warwick Street.
The Lawn Tennis Court Club building adjacent to No 50 is Listed Grade II*. Nos 40 and 42 are Listed Grade II.

Beech House. Name agreed in 2003. Named for the tree. Part of Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Bell Court. 1986. 17 addresses. Possibly named from a bell tower on the site. Part of The Maltings on the site of the old brewery in Lillington Avenue.

Bell Tower Mews. DATE. 3 addresses. A cottage in the street has a bell tower. Off the eastern cul-de-sac part of Woodcote Road.

Belle View Place 01. At least three streets have carried this name. The origin is clearly from the French meaning “nice view”. Before 1886. A court at the rear of No 19 Kenilworth Street. Demolished.  It is questionable whether the street deserved the title “nice view”.

Belle View Place 02. 1817. The origin is clearly from the French meaning “nice view”. Off Ranelagh Terrace. Built by James Bisset for use as his home and gallery. It is questionable whether the street deserved the title “nice view”.

Belle View Place 03. Before 1864. The origin is clearly from the French meaning “nice view”. Rugby Road. It is questionable whether the street deserved the title “nice view”.

Belmont Court. Before 1974. 7 addresses. A mellifluous name with many French connections dating back to 1066. Flats in Park Road.

Belmont Drive. 1974. 8 addresses. A mellifluous name with many French connections dating back to 1066. Off Park Road.

Belmont Mews. 1978. 4 addresses. A mellifluous name with many French connections dating back to 1066. Off Park Road.

Bentley Close. 1958. 22 addresses.  Possibly named for a place near Nuneaton. Newnham Road, Lillington.

Berenska Drive. After 1986. 29 addresses. Jan Berenska led the musical group named the Royal Spa Quartet about 1941. Heemstede Lane, Lillington.

Berrington Road. After 1973. 25 business addresses. Possibly named for a place in Shropshire or Northumbria. Off Sydenham Drive.

Bertie Circus. 1830. A given name for Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, landowner. Only one or two buildings were built and the circus was not completed. Location off Warwick Road, now Warwick Place.

Bertie Road. 1829. Given name of Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, landowner. Early name for Warwick Place.

Bertie Terrace. 1829. 35 addresses. Given name of Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, landowner. A terrace behind a service road on Warwick Place.
Nos 1 to 8 are Listed Grade II.

Beverley Hills estate. 1962. Charles Greatheed Bertie Percy of Guys Cliffe House was the eighth son of the Earl of Beverley. Estate off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Beverley Road. Named about 1925 and the first houses were built before 1947 at the Guys Cliffe Avenue end; the remainder of thr street and modern houses were built from about 1960. 119 addresses. Charles Greatheed Bertie Percy of Guys Cliffe House was the eighth son of the Earl of Beverley. It follows an avenue of trees supposed facing towards Guys Cliffe House, the home of the Greatheeds. From Northumberland Road to Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Binswood Avenue. 1827 to 1831. 212 addresses. Initially named Binswood Terrace, East and West, until about 1850. Named for Bins Brook which was at the west end of the street. From Binswood Street traffic island to Lillington Road, crossing Kenilworth Road.
Binswood Hall is Listed Grade II*. The following are Listed Grade II – Odds, Nos 1 to 19, 21 to 25, Binswood Hall Annex, Nos 31 to 45; Evens, Nos 2 to 10, Nos 50 to 70.
There is a Blue Plaque for Frances Ridley Havergal, hymn writer, at No 43.

Binswood Crescent. 1827. Named for Bins Brook. A name given from time to time to the part of the west part of Binswood Avenue on the north side which curves away from the street with Binswood Hall at the centre. See Binswood Avenue.

Binswood Place. 1825. Named for Bins Brook. Location uncertain, but possibly an early name for that northern part of Clarendon Place which became Binswood Street.

Binswood Square. About 1834. Possibly an early name for Beauchamp Square (or used in error) which is now Christchurch Gardens. Named for Bins Brook.

Binswood Street. Built 1832; named after 1881. 41 addresses. Originally named Clarendon Place and then possibly Binswood Place. Named for Bins Brook. From Clarendon Square to Rugby Road traffic island.

Binswood Terrace, East and West. 1827. Original names for Binswood Avenue before 1850. Named for Bins Brook.

Birchway Close. 1972. 12 addresses. After Stanley William Thomas Birch, mayor 1971 to 1972. Off Riversleigh Road.

Bisset Crescent. About 1978 to 1982. 10 addresses. Named for James Bisset, entrepreneur, owner of galleries around 1820. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Black Lane. Possibly named about 1960; it existed long before this. In 1818 it was known as a ‘Lovers Lane’. 6 addresses. Named for the black cinder topping in the 1960s. Off Gresham Avenue.

Bladon Walk. About 1970 to 1975. 12 addresses. Named for the location of the grave of Winston Churchill in Oxfordshire. Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Blakelands Avenue. About 1968 to 1970. 22 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Blandford Road. 1971. 9 addresses. Named for the Duke of Marlborough who was Earl of Blandford or for Blandford Forum which is a place in Dorset. Off Riversleigh Road.

Blenheim Crescent. About 1982 to 1986. 21 addresses. Named for the scene of the battle of Blenheim in 1704; Blenheim Palace was the house of the Duke of Marlborough; also the house where Winston Churchill was born. Off Cobden Avenue. Sydenham.

Blenheim Place. 1822. Named for scene of the battle in 1704 or Blenheim Palace (which was named for the battle). Oxford Hotel in Clemens Street became Blenheim Hotel after the Duke of Marlborough stayed in 1822; it became part of Stoneleigh Hotel.

Bonniksen Close. 1986. 20 addresses. Named for the owner of the airfield in Harbury Lane (which is not in Leamington). Off Brakesmead, off Tachbrook Road..

Booth’s Terrace. 1818. Named for the owner and builder. In Clemens Street.

Bordesley Court. 1979. 4 addresses. Place in Birmingham. Off Lillington Road. Based on the house called Brampton where Alexander Marshall Lodge, 1882-1938, maker of spark plugs, lived.

Borrowdale Drive. 1964. 21 addresses. Named for a place in the Lake District. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Bourton Drive. 1951. 25 addresses. Named for Bourton-on-Dunsmore near Rugby. Off Lawford Road.

Bowers Croft. 1975. 5 addresses. Named after Miss Bower who lived at the old cottage on this site; she was the sister-in-law of Lt-Col Tunbridge of Castel Froma. Off Lillington Road, adjacent to No 107.

Braemar Road. 1938. 72 addresses. Scottish name refers to landowner of Manor Farm, Mr Mc Gregor. Off Melton Road.

Brakesmead. 1989. 34 addresses. Built on the site of the football ground of the factory of Lockheed Brakes nearby; the team was, and is, called “The Brakes”. Off Culworth Close, off Tachbrook Road.

Brandon Parade. 1833. Possibly named for the village near Coventry. Part of Holly Walk.
Nos 50, 56 to 60 (evens) are Listed Grade II.

Brewery Lane. 1859. Named for the Leamington Brewery in Lillington Avenue. Location possibly part of Lillington Avenue or a lane leading off to the brewery.

Brewery Terrace. Before 1852. A terrace built on the site of an early brewery in the town. In Wise Street. Demolished.

Briar Close. 1950. 58 addresses. Named for the bramble or blackberry bush. Off Haddon Road.

Briar Gardens. 2003 DATE. 10 addresses. Named for the bramble or blackberry bush. At the end of Briar Close.

Bridge Street. 1827. Briefly used as the name for Newbold Road which became Willes Road. Named for the bridge over the River Leam in Willes Road.

Broadhaven Close. About 1964 to 1968. 12 addresses. Place in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Broadlands. Before 1893. Origin unclear. Lucas Court, Warwick New Road. This house was once part of the College and was well-known for having a language laboratory.

Brook Street. 1826. After demolition it was renamed New Brook Street. Named for Bins Brook which flowed to the west of the street. Warwick Street to Regent Street.

Brookhurst Court. DATE Before 1990. 42 addresses. Origin unknown. Beverley Road. Brookhurst Court is on the site of a large house of this name which was the clubhouse for the golf course.

Brooklands House. About 1870. Converted about 2002. Origin unknown. Part of Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Brownlow Street. 1904. 29 addresses. Brownlow Bertie was the uncle of Bertie Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House. Off Campion Road.

Brown’s Buildings. Before 1903. Possibly named for the owner. Leam Terrace East.

Brunel Court. Name agreed 2016, being built in 2019. About 16 addresses. Named for Isambard Kingdom Brunel who was engineer for the nearby Great Western Railway; records show that Brunel stayed at the Regent Hotel. Off Station Approach.

Brunswick Court. DATE. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. Brunswick Street.

Brunswick Place. Before 1887. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. This was on the site of what is now Christine Ledger Square. The British Restaurant was built in front of the building in World War II and this later became a school central kitchen. Nos 40 to 48 Brunswick Street.

Brunswick Street. Began about 1813 and extended to the town boundary by about 1850. 414 addresses. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. End on connection to Clemens Street at the canal bridge.
The following are Listed Grade II – Odds, Nos 15 to 27, 33, 43 to 51.

Brunswick Terrace. Before 1852. Named for the Earl of Brunswick who was connected to Kenilworth Castle. Corner of Brunswick Street and Aylesford Street.

Buchanan Street. 1834. About 9 houses. Origin unknown. From Court Street to Althorpe Street. Demolished.

Buckley Road. 1945; began as early site of prefabricated homes in World War II. 207 addresses. Named for WH Buckley, manager of the waterworks in Campion Terrace. From Gresham Avenue to Mason Avenue.

Burbury Close. 1959. 29 addresses. Origin unknown; possibly one of several places or people named Burbury. Off Mason Avenue.

Burbury’s Court. 1849. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Burford Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 10 addresses. Named for the town in the Cotswolds. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Burman Close. 2006. 12 addresses. Named after a talented artist and former lecturer at Warwickshire College; a resident of Leamington Spa for 30 years; exhibited work at Leamington Art Gallery and the Herbert Art Gallery, Coventry. Off Lillington Road.

Burns Road. 1938. 33 addresses. Probably named for Robert Burns, poet; Scottish connection to Eddie McGregor, landowner. Off Kinross Road.

Burridge Place. 2019. 6 addresses. The name proposed by developer but origin unknown. Off Llewellyn Road.

Bury Road. 1930. 110 addresses. Dr RF Bury was the mayor in 1929, 1930 and 1931. Off Tachbrook Road, Shrubland estate.

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Calder Walk. Name agreed 1969. 40 addresses. Possibly a place name in Scotland. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Camberwell Terrace. 1887. 52 addresses. Place name in south London. Off Radford Road.

Cambray Cottages. Before 1934. Possibly named for a feature in Cheltenham (a successful Spa before Leamington). In Gulistan Road.

Cambridge Gardens. 1964. 9 flats. City name. Flats which replaced No 72 Upper Holly Walk.

Cameron Close. 1954. 22 addresses. Scottish estate. Off Montrose Avenue on Eddie McGregor’s land.

Campion Green. 1930. 20 addresses. John Campion (1776 -1826) was the farmer at Newbold Comyn Farm. Off Campion Road.

Campion Road. 1866. 64 addresses. John Campion (1776 -1826) was the farmer at Newbold Comyn Farm. Road properly made 1889, to brickworks. Off Lillington Road.

Campion Terrace. On a map but unnamed in 1838; named before 1857. 52 addresses. John Campion (1776 -1826) was the farmer at Newbold Comyn Farm. Leicester Street to Upper Holly Walk.

Canberra Mews. 2014. 23 homes. Named as tribute to Sir Frank Whittle, inventor of the jet engine. The Canberra was a jet-engined medium bomber. Off Park Road.

Canning Street. Before 1849. Leopard Inn, pub on corner with Court Street, otherwise houses of Buchanan Street backed on to this street. Origin unknown. Alternative name (or mistake) for Cumming Street. Off Althorpe Street.

Carlton House. 1971. 34 flats. Origin unknown. Corner of Dale Street and Regent Street. Built on the site of a demolished Listed Grade II building.

Cashmore Avenue. 1919. 25 homes. George Cashmore, Mayor 1918. Initially named New Road. Council houses 1930. Off Tachbrook Road.

Caswell Road. 1965. 6 business addresses. Origin unknown. Off Berrington Road, Sydenham commercial.

Cecil Court. Before 1974. About 15 flats. Origin unknown. Flats in Mill Road.

Cedar Close. 1954. 16 addresses. Possibly named for trees in the area. Off Lime Avenue.

Cedar House. Name agreed in 2003. Probably named for the tree. Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Cemetery Road. Before 1891. Alongside cemetery. Possibly renamed Albert Street. Off Old Milverton Road. TO BE CONFIRMED

Central Avenue. 1925. 16 homes. Centre street of first council house estate in town. Initially named Centre Road off Tachbrook Road.

Chandos Court. 1990. 49 flats at No 40 Chandos Street. Probably named for Mr Chandos Leigh who became Lord Leigh in 1829.

Chandos Street. From 1828. 71 addresses. Mostly demolished 1956 to 1966. Probably named for Mr Chandos Leigh who became Lord Leigh in 1839. Off Warwick Street.
Nos 31 to 37 (odds) are Listed Grade II.

Chapel Court. About 1991. Conversion of St Luke’s Chapel, Hamilton Terrace to offices; received Coventry Telegraph Award. St Luke’s built in 1849, architect Daniel Squirhill.

Chapel Cross. DATE. Probably named for Roman Catholic chapel of St Peter in nearby George Street of 1828. Corner Church Street and Chapel Street; previously site of Guernsey Garage.

Chapel Street. From 1830. 21 addresses.  Probably named for Roman Catholic chapel of St Peter in nearby George Street of 1828. Off Church Street.

Chapman’s Court. Before 1852. Probably owned by a Mr Chapman, who may have been the owner. Off Brook Street. Now demolished.

Charlbury Mews. 1977. 9 houses. Place in Oxfordshire. Off Lambourne Crescent, Sydenham.

Charlecote Gardens. 1989. 23 addresses. Named for the local Charlecote Park (NT), stately home. Off Marlborough Drive, Sydenham.

Charles Gardner Road. New name agreed in 1964. 76 addresses. Named for Charles W Gardner, Mayor 1944 to 1945. New street and homes replaced parts of Shrubland Street and Scotland Place.

Charles Street. Before 1837. Origin unknown. Slums demolished 1956. Off Neilston Street, Althorpe Street. Business premises.

Charles Watson Court. 1978. 39 addresses. Possibly named for Charles Watson Mill who was proprietor of Theatre Royal 1910-1934. Off Shuckburgh Grove.

Charlotte Street. 1818. 137 addresses. Named for Charlotte of Mecklinberg-Strelitz (1744-1818), the Queen of George III, or Princess Charlotte (1796-1817), only daughter of King George IV (her death led to Victoria becoming Queen). Off Brunswick Street.
The south side was built in stages as Claremont House land was sold off; the north side was filled in as Rusina Villa was demolished.
Nos 7 to 19 (odds), 46 and 48 are Listed Grade II.
The first houses on the north side (Nos 7 to 21) were named South Parade; this caused confusion with the street also named South Parade that became Clarendon Avenue in 1881.

Charnwood Way. 1972. 62 addresses. Forest mainly in Leicestershire. Off Parklands Avenue, Lillington.

Chatsworth Gardens. About 1986 to 1990. 15 homes. Stately home. Off Beaulieu Park, Sydenham

Chesham Place. Before 1871.  The town or Lord Chesham. Alley south side of John Street off Bedford Street. Demolished DATE..

Chesham Street. 1871. 37 addresses. Named for town or Lord Chesham. Off St Mary’s Crescent. Previously simply named as a Mews Road.

Chesham Terrace. 1877. Named for town or Lord Chesham. Demolished 1969. Alongside canal off Chesham Street.

Chester Place. Before 1870. No record after 1873. Place name. Off Clarendon Avenue.

Chesterton Drive. About 1980 to 1986. 19 addresses. Local village. Off Sydenham Drive.

Chestnut Gardens. 1993. Tree name. Original name proposed for Chestnut Square. Off Gresham Place.

Chestnut Square. Proposal 1993. 41 addresses. Tree name. Originally to be named as Chestnut Gardens. Off Gresham Place.

Cheviot Rise. 1972. 14 addresses. Range of hills. Off Parklands Avenue.

Chorlton Court. Before 1973. Origin unknown. 15 flats, Nos 75-87 Binswood Avenue.

Christ Church Gardens. 1829. Named for church demolished in 1957. Plans to retain the church tower or to build a block of flats or offices designed by Sir Frederick Gibberd, not implemented. Earlier named Newbold Square or Beauchamp Square/Gardens. Off Clarendon Avenue. Used as gardens and tennis courts.
Three telephone boxes on the south side are Listed Grade II.

Christine Ledger Square. 1970. 75 addresses. Christine James Ledger, Mayor 1961-62. 75 buildings. Off Brunswick Street

Church Hill. 1828. 60 addresses. Initially part of Cross Street. Named for the Pepper Box or Milverton Episcopal Chapel which stood at the end of the street from 1835; it was replaced by houses, Nos 22 to 26 Milverton Terrace about 1906. An extension from the west end of Regent Street.
No 2 is Listed Grade II.

Church Lane, Leamington Priors. Early name for Church Street. Church of All Saints from before 1100; church Listed Grade II*. From High Street to Priory Terrace.

Church Lane, Lillington. Before 1711. 19 addresses. Church of St Mary Magdalene from before 1100; church Listed Grade II*. Manor House Listed Grade II. Off Lillington Road.
The Manor House and the Church of St Mary Magdalene are Listed Grade II.

Church Street. Earlier Church Lane. Parish church founded before 1100. 37 addresses. Site of the oldest surviving cottages in the town (Nos 15 and 17). Off High Street to Priory Terrace.
All Saints Church is Listed Grade II*. The Commonwealth Club (No 3), Nos 5 to 17 (odds) are Listed Grade II.
There is a Blue Plaque for Thomas Baker, artist, at No 13.

Church Terrace. 1828. 14 addresses. Church of All Saints. Nos 4 and 6 Listed Grade II. Off Church Street.
Nos 4 and 6 and the Shakespeare Inn are Listed Grade II.

Church Walk. Before 1813. 4 business addresses. See Church Street. Off Bath Street. Nos 1 to 4 are Listed Grade II.

Clapham Road. 1904. Early name for Clapham Street. Possibly Clapham family of Stockton or an area of London. Off Clapham Terrace.

Clapham Square. 1887. 20 addresses. Origin see Clapham Road. Off Clapham Terrace.

Clapham Street. 1904. 20 addresses. Origin see Clapham Road. Off Clapham Terrace.

Clapham Terrace. Street laid out about 1800 for access to canal. 106 addresses. Building from 1857. Possibly Clapham family of Stockton or an area of London. Off Radford Road.

Clare Close. About 1955. 47 addresses. Unknown origin. Off Buckley Road

Claremont Road. 1871. 49 addresses. Claremont House between Charlotte Street and Claremont Road on Tachbrook Road; perhaps reference to a country house in Surrey. 41 buildings. House on corner with Tachbrook Road has date 1871 on the wall. Note that the main part of the street was originally named Claremont Street (see below).

Claremont Street. 1871. This name appears on maps from about 1881 to 1905 for the main part of what is Claremont Road in 2019 which runs east to west.  Only the part which joins the street to Charlotte Street is named on these maps as Claremont Road (see above). It is possible that this was a mistake by mapmakers because no press reports have been found using the name Claremont Street; applications for sewers etc by builder John Hart around 1870 always refer to ‘Road’.

Clarence Mansions. Renamed DATE. 33 addresses. This name dates from before 2001. Recent name for Clarence Terrace (1827) after renovation. Origin of name, see Clarence Street.
Nos 1 to 6 are Listed Grade II*.

Clarence Street. From 1835. 3 addresses; the main one is Aga Rangemaster at Eagle Foundry. Duke of Clarence who became William IV. Site of Eagle foundry of 1835 which was from 1856 well-known as Sidney Flavel’s. Off Brunswick Street.

Clarence Terrace. 1827. 33 addresses. Nos 1-6 are Listed Grade II. Recently named Clarence Mansions after renovation. Origin of name, see Clarence Street. Designer Joseph Nevil(le). Oddfellows Hall has been at the east end since 1831. Warwick Street.

Clarendon Avenue. Started 1820. 174 addresses. Earl of Clarendon. Named South Parade until 1881.
3 telephone boxes type K6 near Christchurch Gardens and No 2 are Listed Grade II. Off Clarendon Square to Clarendon Street.

Clarendon Crescent. 1825. 30 addresses. One source states that it was built as Bertie Circus but may not be accurate CHECK. Earl of Clarendon. Off Beauchamp Hill.
Nos 1 to 9 are Listed Grade II.
No 6 has a Blue Plaque for William de Normanville (1843-1928), borough engineer from 1882 to 1917; noted for installing iron bridges in the town.

Clarendon Place. From 1825. 51 addresses. Initially also the name extended to the north to what is now Binswood Street. Named for the Earl of Clarendon. See also Arbenie Crescent and Waterloo Place.
Bethany Home (previously York House), Somerset House and Nos 1, 3 and 12 are Listed Grade II. Warwick Street to Clarendon Square.

Clarendon Square. From 1818. 192 addresses. Earl of Clarendon. South-side designed by P F Robinson. Off Clarendon Avenue.
Nos 3-10, 12-17, 25-30, 25A, 32-43, Arden House, Magnolia House and Binswood Lawn are Listed Grade II.
There is a Blue plaque at No 6 for the few months that Napoleon III stayed in town in exile.

Clarendon Street. Before 1810. 147 addresses. Earl of Clarendon. Earlier was part of Lillington Lane. Off Holly Walk.
Nos 29, 80, 87, 103 and 105 are Listed Grade II.

Clemens Street. 1808. 105 addresses. Named for Samuel Clemens, businessman and landowner of Warwick. Off High Street.
4, 6, 34, 36, 62, 64 and 66 are Listed Grade II.

Cleveland Court, Before 1969. 20 flats. Origin unknown. Nos 41-43 Kenilworth Road.

Cliffe Court. 1964. 21 addresses. Named after Guys Cliffe, home of the Greatheed family.  Corner of Rugby Road and Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Cliffe Road. Before 1887. 19 addresses. Named after Guys Cliffe, home of Greatheed family. Originally a mews road. Rugby Road to Beverley Road.

Clifton Court. Name agreed in 1959 for blocks of 12 flats in Beaconsfield Street. Possibly named for Clifton-on-Dunsmore. Off St Mary’s Road.

Clinton Street. Before 1834. 4 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Church Terrace.

Cloister Crofts. Short length off Kenilworth Road in 1890. Extended with houses from 1923. 42 addresses. Probably from a mistaken legend that monks used the track from Kenilworth Priory to Lillington Church. A faded painted sign states THE Cloister Crofts.

Cloister Way. 1937. 70 addresses. See Cloister Crofts. Off Cloister Crofts.

Close, The. See The Close.

Coach House Mews. About 1888. Probably named for a coach-house on the site. Off Arlington Avenue (previously Street).

Cobden Avenue. About 1982 to 1986. 41 addresses. Named for Richard Cobden, protester against corn laws in 1860s, apostle of free trade, and who may have campaigned from Leamington. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Cockermouth Close. 1965. 14 addresses. Place in Cumbria. Off Borrowdale Drive.

Colbourne Grove. About 1985. 6 homes. Earlier proposed name was Colbourne Drive. Named for a partner in the Burgis and Colbourne department store (now House of Fraser for the time being). Off Lamintone Drive, Beverley Hills.

College Drive. Soon after 1988. 15 houses. Built on the playing field of Leamington College, later North Leamington School. Off Woodcote Road.

College Road. DATE. Named for Leamington College for Boys, Binswood Avenue; occasional name used for Beauchamp Road, perhaps only for an anniversary of the college. Off Binswood Avenue.

Colonnade (The). See Victoria Colonnade.

Compton Close. About 1955. 30 addresses. Possibly named for Fenny Compton or Denis Compton, a Test cricketer. Off Wellington Road.

Comyn Street. 1862. About 37 houses in 1950; 14 houses in 2019. Named for Newbold Comyn. The original houses were purchased by the council and demolished about 1975; new houses built 1977. Part of a new street off Princes Street carries the name.

Conifer Grove. About 1986. 8 addresses. Named for a tree in the arboretum on the site of Hitchman’s hydropathic establishment. Off Wych Elm Grove.

Coningsby Close. About 1970 to 1975. 12 addresses. Place name, Lincolnshire; possible link to Gunpowder Plot. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Coniston Road. 1955. 92 addresses. Lake in Cumbria. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Conway Road. 1970. 14 addresses. Earlier named Cross Road. Possibly named for the town in North Wales. Houses built from 1970. Off Oswald Road.

Copps Road. Name agreed in 2003. 41 addresses. Michael Copps of Copps’ Royal Hotel, High Street (1827-1847). Off Warwick New Road.

Cornwall Place. 1879. 21 addresses. Name of county. Off Rugby Road.

Corsair Close. 2018. 12 addresses. The Corsair was a model of Ford car and Soans garage which was on the site was a Ford main dealer. New housing built on site of business premises. Off Ramsey Road.

Corston Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 9 addresses. Possibly the village in Somerset. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Cosford Close. 1959. 15 homes. Place in Shropshire; site of Raf airfield and RAF museum. Off Newnham Road.

Cottage Close. 1969. 16 homes. Possibly named for cottages by Sydenham Farm. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Cottage Square. About 2002. 20 addresses. Possibly named for cottages by Sydenham Farm. Off Marloes Walk. Near Sydni Centre which was built on site of a primary school.

Cottage Walk. About 2002. 18 addresses. Possibly named for cottages by Sydenham Farm. Off Cottage Square. Near Sydni Centre.

Coughton Drive. About 1986 to 1990. 28 addresses. Probably named for Coughton Court, a National Trust house near Alcester. Off Marlborough Drive, Sydenham.

Court Street. 1808. 32 business addresses. The Leopard Inn and Oak Tavern were in the street at some time. Perhaps named for Richard Court, a local farmer. This was the site of brick kilns when Clemens Street was being built. Houses demolished 1968. Business premises. Off High Street.

Courts Home Close. See Home Close.

Coventry Street. 1843. Place name. Early name for the new road to Kenilworth which was renamed Kenilworth Road from 1879. Off Clarendon Avenue.

Covent Garden Market. 1827. Probably named for the market in London. Demolished 1969 to 1979; replaced mainly by car parking. Off Warwick Street.

Cowdray Close. About 1969.48 addresses. Possibly the cricketer Colin Cowdray or, more likely, a polo venue. Off Sydenham Drive.

Crabtree Grove. About 1968 to 1970. 11 addresses. Refers to crab apple trees. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Crabtree Lane. Before 1783. Refers to crab apple trees. Early name for Upper Holly Walk; evidently, it is now more noted for Holly bushes.

Craig Close. About 1978 to 1982. 7 addresses. Named for Rev John Craig at All Saints church from 1839 to 1877.  Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Crawford Close. 1953. 31 addresses. Scottish estate. Off St Andrews Road.

Creaking Hill. Before 1872. Early name for all or part of Hill Street. Off Leicester Street.

Cricket Street. Proposal in 1873 as the name for the street which became Archery Road. Named for the sport. Off Adelaide Road. It was mainly on the site of the cricket ground of Wisden and Parr which covered much of what is now Victoria Street, Victoria Road and Victoria Park.

Cromer Road. Before 1936. 21 addresses. Seaside town in Norfolk. Off Valley Road.

Cross Leam Street. This was the name of part of Leam Street before renaming in 1873. Named for the river. Off St Marys Road.

Cross Road. Before 1879. 20 addresses. A name for a street which simply went across other streets. Initially a Mews Road. The west part was renamed Conway Road. Houses from before 1928. Off Oswald Road.

Cross Street 01. The street built from 1815 which was renamed Regent Street in 1819 when Prince Regent visited. A name for a street which simply went across other streets, in this case primarily the Parade. It was earlier renamed as Lower Cross Street when the street parallel to the north was named Upper Cross Street for a short time (Warwick Street).

Cross Street 02. The street presently named Cross Street which was initially a Mews Road (built from 1838). 20 addresses. A name for a street which simply went across other streets. Off Clarendon Street.

Crowden Drive. After 2006. 24 addresses. Named after a motor engineer (Charles T Crowden). Produced his 12 light motor cars at his Packington Place works between 1898 and 1904. One of his cars is in the Coventry Motor Museum. Moved from Bath. Off Lillington Road.

Crown Terrace. DATE. 19 addresses. Adjoined the east side of the Crown Hotel and at one time the hotel was built across the street at first floor level. Off High Street.

Crown Way. 1954. 118 addresses. Origin related to the Coronation in 1953. Off Cubbington Road.

Cubbington Road. Before 1711. 230 addresses. The turnpike road from Warwick to Cubbington and on to Rugby. An earlier name for part of it was Great Churchway. Off Lillington Road.

Culworth Close. 1975. 83 addresses. Place near Sulgrave Manor in Northamptonshire. Off Tachbrook Road.

Culworth Court. 1975. About 9 flats. Place near Sulgrave Manor in Northamptonshire. Culworth Close.

Cumberland Crescent. 1972. 29 addresses. One-time county name. Off Parklands Avenue.

Cumming Street. Before 1849. Leopard Inn, pub on corner with Court Street, otherwise the houses of Buchanan Street backed on to this street. Alternative and more usual name for Canning Street. Origin unknown. Off Court Street.

Cundall Close. About 1978 to 1982. 8 addresses. John Cundall was a local architect, perhaps best known for the Town Hall; Blue plaque honours him at No 47 Warwick Street. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.29 addresses.

Curzon Grove. About 1970 to 1975. 20 addresses. Perhaps named for Lord Curzon or a family name in north Warwickshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

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Dale Stret. About 1830. 129 addresses. James Dale was a landowner in the area who died in 1851. South from Warwick Street to an end-on connection with Adelaide Road. The Methodist Chapel and schoolroom were built in 1870 to replace the chapel in Portland Street. The Dale Street chapel was demolished and replaced in 1971.
Nos 1 to 27 (odds) and 31 to 39 (odds) are Listed Grade II. No 29 was listed but was demolished despite that..

Danesbury Crescent. Before 1967. 8 addresses. Origin unknown; possibly for a park in Welwyn. The street is a cul-de-sac at both ends and the northerly access to the street is from Gainsborough Drive by Springwell Road, Sydenham.

Davidson Avenue. Before 1973. 34 addresses. Oswald Rae Davidson, Mayor 1951-1952. Off Radford Road; partly on the site of Warneford Hospital.

Davis Close. About 1986. 6 addresses. Probably named for Mayor Valerie Davis, 1986-1987, although two other Davises have also been mayor. Off Avonlea Rise.

De Normanville Avenue. Name agreed in 2016, being built in 2019. About 16 addresses. De Normanville was borough surveyor from DATE to DATE; he is noted for designing iron structures in the town including Adelaide Bridge and the swimming pool at the Pump Room, now the library in 2019.
William Louis de Normanville was the Borough Engineer for Leamington Spa for 35 years (1882 to 1917) and responsible for major developments: three bridges (all still very much as they were built), the layout of the Pump Room Gardens (which will be the shortest route for residents of the WHA development when walking into Leamington), Victoria Park and Jephson Gardens. Off Station Approach.

De Normanville Court ???. 2019. Addresses. De Normanville was borough surveyor from DATE to DATE; he is noted for designing iron structures in the town including Adelaide Bridge and the swimming pool at the Pump Room, now the library in 2019. Off Station Approach.

Delamere Way. About 1967. 11 addresses. Forest in Cheshire. Off Parklands Avenue.

Dell House. 1958. 6 flats. Named for The Dell further north along the course of Bins Brook. New Brook Street.

Denby Close. 1956. 42 addresses. Named for Denby House which was the home of John Williams, the first owner of the Regent Hotel. Denby is believed to have been the maiden name of Mrs Williams. The house was just to the east of the site of the Town Hall; The library was moved from this house in 1885 and it was demolished soon afterwards. Off Mason Avenue.

Denville Road. 1971. 7 addresses. Unknown; Denville hall in in Northwood, Hillingdon is a home for those retired from theatrical professions. Off Dereham Court.

Dereham Court. 1971. 28 addresses. Unknown; Dereham is a town in Norfolk. Off Lillington Avenue.

Derwent Close. 1958. 10 addresses. One of several streets in the area named for the Lake District. Off Coniston Road.

Dickins Place. Before 1852. About 3 houses. A small court probably named for the owner; possibly County Councillor Dickins in 1895. Off Kenilworth Street. Demolished 1950s.

Dickins Yard. Before 1899. Possibly a similar story to Dickins Place. Renamed Wimbourne Place in 1936. Off Kenilworth Street. Demolished 1950s.

Dormer Place. Possibly 1810; recorded as The Mall in 1815 and either the street or the footpath alongside was known as The Promenade from about 1838 to 1870. 40 addresses. Lord and Lady Dormer, visitors to town. Alongside the north side of Pump Room Gardens. Site of St Peter’s Roman Catholic Church built in 1864; the tower was added in 1877; the small spire was known as the pineapple. The church was badly damaged by a fire in 1883.
St Peter’s Church and the adjoining Presbytery are Listed Grade II as well as Nos 9 to 23.

Dragon Cottage. DATE. Origin unknown. Guys Cliffe Avenue. This cottage survives and was the groundsman’s cottage for the golf course.

Drummond Street. About 1830. About 3 houses. Unknown origin; there is a Drummond Castle in Perthshire. Off Court Street. Housing demolished about 1952.

Dudley Green. 1947. 30 addresses. Possibly named either for Ambrose Dudley, Earl of Warwick or the town in West Midlands. Off Buckley Road.

Dugdale Court. Before 1973. 33 addresses. Probably named for Sir William Dugdale (1605-1686), author of local histories. Brunswick Street.

Duke Street. Building was taking place in 1861. 24 addresses. One of several streets named for male noble titles in the area. Off Earl Street.

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Eagle Street. Before 1873. 53 addresses. Named for Eagle Foundry which was founded about 1835 in nearby Clarence Street; it was later Flavel’s factory; Eagle was a name which was frequently used for foundries; over a dozen have been located in England alone. Off Aylesford Street.

Earl Street. About 1869. 5 addresses. One of several streets named for Royal and Noble Titles in the area. Off Queen Street.

East Dene. 1954. 26 addresses. A dene is a steep wooded vale or valley. Off Haddon Road.

East Grove. 1868. 27 addresses. To the east of Grove Place. Off Aylesford Street.

Eastfield Road. 1851. 34 addresses. Mews Road to Newbold Terrace East. Houses built after 1953. Probably simply refers to a field to the east of the town. The name before about 1952 was as an eastern extension of Rosefield Street. Off Willes Road.

Eastnor Grove. 1838. 12 addresses. Initially named Eastnor Street; named for Viscount Eastnor. Off Radford Road.

Eastnor Terrace 01. 1838. About 12 impressive houses were completed. Named for Viscount Eastnor. Old Warwick Road; the terrace was never completed and was demolished for the building of Leamington Station about 1851. Old Warwick Road.

Eastnor Terrace 02. 1847. 10 houses. Viscount Eastnor. Name used until about 1870 for Nos 1 to 19 (odds) Tachbrook Road; some reports claim that bricks from the first Eastnor Terrace (01) were reused to build this terrace.

Eastwood Close. About 1970 to 1975. 14 addresses. Unknown origin; probably a reference to a wood on this eastern side of the town; also a coal mining area in Nottinghamshire. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Eaton Close. About 1986. 8 addresses. Unknown origin; Eaton Square in London has recently been named as the most expensive place to live in the UK. Off Avonlea Rise.

Eden Court. 1960. 39 flats. Named for Sir Anthony Eden, local MP from 1923 to 1957, later Lord Avon. The building was opened by John Hobson (local MP 1957 to 1967); he was knighted in 1962 when he became Solicitor-General. The Crest.

Edinburgh Crescent. 1947. 24 addresses. Possibly named for the Duke of Edinburgh or simply the Scottish capital city; see also Philip Court. Off Kingsway.

Edmondscote Road. 1948. 77 addresses. Named for nearby Edmondscote Manor, nowadays headquarters of Guide Dogs for the Blind. Off Princes Drive. Access to an athletics track.

Edward Street. 1909. 18 addresses. Probably named for King Edward VII. Off Old Milverton Road.

Elan Close. Before 1972. 17 addresses. Site of reservoir in Wales. Off Valley Road.

Elisabeth Court. Name agreed 2005. 8 flats. Built on part of Elisabeth the Chef site. Off Beaconsfield Street.

Elizabeth Mews. Name agreed in 2004. 5 addresses. Queen Elizabeth II. Off Wallsgrove Close. SNN Built on a former garage site

Elizabeth Road. 1947. 44 addresses. Princess Elizabeth. Off Kingsway.

Elliston Grove. About 1978 to 1982. 24 addresses. Probably named for William Gore Elliston who built the Parthenon about 1821. Off Bisset Crescent, Sydenham.

Elm Bank Close. 1955. 28 addresses. Elm Bank was the name of a house on the site dating from before 1861. About 1953 the site was ear-marked for a new fire station and houses for firemen but they were never built; however, houses for firemen were built in Cloister Crofts nearby. Off Lillington Road.

Elm Road. 1904. Mainly a mews road for Vicarage Road; only one house address. Probably named for local trees which were common in the area before Dutch Elm Disease from about 1970 killed most of them by 1980. Off Cubbington Road.

Elton Close. 1955. 28 addresses. Unknown origin; Elton is a district of Huntingdon. Off Wellington Road.

Ely Place. 1851. Unknown origin, city in Cambridgeshire. Off Binswood Avenue.

Emerald Way. 1996. 16 addresses. The name was suggested by the builder for the development on the site of Henry Griffiths jewel factory. Off Queensway.

Emmott Drive. About 1978 to 1982. 33 addresses. Willie Emmott was one the three founders of Automotive Products/Lockheed in Leamington in 1920; they were known as the Three Musketeers. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Emperor Boulevard. About 1998 to 2002. 23 addresses. Named for the butterfly, the purple emperor. Off St Fremund Way. This street continues to the south into Whitnash and a series of streets named for butterflies.

Endsleigh Gardens. About 1968 to 1970. 21 addresses. Origin Unknown; possibly named for Endsleigh Gardens in London which was the southern part of Euston Square, famed for the site of murders. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

England Crescent. 1946. 26 addresses. Named for Mayor K R England, 1920. Off Bury Road.

Ennerdale Close. 1964. 12 addresses. One of several streets in the area named for the Lake District. Off Borrowdale Road.

Enright Close. 1996. 11 addresses. Dennis Joseph Enright was an author, poet and old boy of Clapham Terrace School and Leamington College. Off Strachey Avenue, off Woodcote Road.

Epping Way. 1963. 10 addresses. A name of a forest in Essex. Off Parklands Avenue.

Epsom Road. 1934. 21 addresses. The first of the streets to be named for the racecourse; built on Stud Farm which was owned by Sidney McGregor and used for breeding and training racehorses. Off Cubbington Road.

Euston Place. 1832. 20 addresses. Earl of Euston, son of Duke of Grafton, frequent visitor to town. Off Newbold Terrace, parallel to the Parade. Rebuilt in 1839 after a fire.
The War Memorial and Nos 1 to 13 are Listed Grade II.

Euston Square. Before 1973. Origin see Euston Place. Off Rosefield Place rear of Euston Place. No longer exists after the building on the site of the Justice Centre facing Newbold Terrace.

Evelyn Place. 1887. 4 addresses. Unknown origin. Nos 46 to 52 Tachbrook Road.

Exmoor Drive. 1963. 15 addresses. A geographical area and National Park in Devon. Off Parklands Avenue.

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Fairhurst Drive. 1991. 13 houses. Cynthia Fairhurst was Head of Kingsley School, 1977-1988, built on the playing fields of Kingsley School. Off Fryer Avenue.

Fairlawn Close. 1886. 35 addresses. Origin unknown, area in Barnet, London. Off Rugby Road.

Fairview Place. Before 1877. Origin unknown, generic name. Off Kenilworth Street. Court demolished DATE

Fallow Hill. 1970. 125 addresses including houses and flats. A field name in the area in 1665. Off Sydenham Drive.

Farley Street. 1838. 17 houses. Origin unknown; Farley is in Wiltshire and Farley Hill in Bedfordshire. Off Radford Road.

Farm Lane. Early name for Farm Road, Lillington (see below). 23 houses. Leads to Manor Farm, Lillington. Off Lime Avenue.

Farm Road. Later name for Farm Lane. 23 houses. Before 1885. Leads to Manor Farm, Lillington. Off Avenue.

Farm Terrace. 1888. Name sometimes used for Farm View (see below). Situated on farmland, either Sydenham Farm or Rushmore Farm. South end of Clapham Terrace.

Farm View. 1888. Situated on farmland, relates to either Sydenham Farm or Rushmore Farm. South end of Clapham Terrace.

Farriers Yard. DATE. Probably the base for farrier. One property in Swan Street. Not found recently.

Featherstone Court. Before 1973. Possibly Mayor Fetherston-Dilke 1945-46 but different spelling; or a place near Pontefract well known for a Rugby League football team and also a place in Staffordshire. Tachbrook Road. Location uncertain, but possibly demolished to build Sayer Court near the corner of Kingsway.

Fell Grove. 1982. 11 houses. John Fell was the builder of the Town Hall and other buildings and was also Mayor in 1887 and 1889. Off Wackrill Drive, Lillington.

Felmore Grove. About 1968 to 1970. 12 houses. Sometimes spelt with two ‘l’s. Origin unknown; Felmore is a place in Essex. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Fernhill Drive. Street and modern houses built in1950. 23 houses. Origin unknown; place name near Bury. Off Upper Holly Walk. Part of the street occupies the site of Newbold Comyn House. Includes two houses dated 1891 and 1903

Field Close. Noted but not located.

Finings Court. 1984. 20 homes. Named for part of the beer brewing process. On site of the old brewery, The Maltings, Lillington Avenue.

Firshill Drive. A name proposed by a builder in Old Milverton Road in 1995, never built.

Flavel Crescent. 1931. 16 homes. Probably named for Sidney Flavel junior, Mayor on six occasions from 1883. Off Bury Road.

Forfield Place. 1838. 35 houses. Origin unknown; no place name found. Off Radford Road.

Foxdale Walk. About 1970 to 1975. 12 houses. A rural sounding name; place name in the Isle of Man. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Foy Place. Before 1840. Origin unknown; place name in Herefordshire. Off Lansdowne Street. Demolished DATE

Frances Havergal Close. 1997. 85 addresses. Frances Havergal was a poet and hymnwriter (1847-1879). The street is on the site of the old gas works, Ranelagh Terrace. Blue plaque to Frances Havergal at 43 Binswood Avenue; she was in Leamington from about 1874.

Frank Whittle Gardens (Sir). 2012. 6 homes. Inventor of the jet engine, at school at Leamington College about 1927. Blue plaque at 9 Victoria Street. West end of Park Road. Note that this road was transferred to Leamington from Old Milverton by Order in 2015.

Frank Whittle Mews (Sir). 2013. 3 addresses. See Frank Whittle Gardens (Sir). Built near to the siite of his father’s workshop on Clinton Street.

Freemans Close. 1958. 38 addresses. Unlikely but Leslie Lionel Freeman was Mayor in 1966-1967. Across the end of Gaveston Road.

Freshwater Grove. About 1964 to 1968. 20 addresses. Place in the Isle of Wight and Pembrokeshire. Other streets in the area are named for places in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Frost Street. 1808. The first  name for Bedford Street; it was renamed before 1812. Mr D Frost was a land-owner and had the first house in Leamington built north of the river on the north-west corner of the crossroads of Regent Street and the Parade. Off Regent Street.

Fryer Avenue. 1991. 24 houses. Edwin Harry Fryer was Mayor from 1953 to 1955. Off Northumberland Road. 

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Gainsborough Drive. About 1964 to 1968. 33 addresses. Probably named for the town of Gainsborough in Lincolnshire. Off Sydenham Drive.

Gainsborough Hall. Name agreed in 2017, opened soon after. Care home. Probably named for the town of Gainsborough in Lincolnshire. It includes Abbey House, the building with the archway. Russell Street.

Garden Court. 1863. 10 houses. Origin unknown, possibly suggesting gardens alongside Bins Brook. Renamed Garden Place in 1880 after a petition from residents because the “courts” of Leamington had acquired a poor reputation. Demolished about 1962. Rugby Road, now the site of the flats named Stamford Gardens. See also Barratt Court and Place and Stamford Court and Place.

Garden Place. 1880. See Garden Court above.

Garden View Cottages. Before 1886. 3 cottages. Probably overlooked gardens which are now allotments. Rear of Leam Terrace accessed by Railway Terrace.

Garway Close. 1974. 16 houses. Origin unknown; possibly named for the place in Hertfordshire. Off Belmont Drive, off Park Road.

Gas Street. Before 1834. 47 addresses. The original access to Gas Works in Ranelagh Terrace. The whole loop of the street was originally named Priory Street. Off Tachbrook Road.

Gaveston Road. 1890. 39 addresses. Piers Gaveston was a ‘favourite’ of King Edward II, and he was beheaded by nobles, including the Earl of Warwick, at Blakelow Hill, Warwick in 1312; there is a memorial on the hill. Rugby Road.
There is a Blue Plaque for Mary Dormer Harris, historian, at No 16.

Gem Place. Date unknown but appears on maps before 1882; the name appears to be quite recent. 4 addresses. May be linked to the fact that there was a jewellery trade by Clarendon Street (Triggs was one long-established business). Clarendon Street. Began as a mews road for houses in Clarendon Avenue and nearly meets with Oxford Place.

George Street. 1808. 69 addresses. Location of St Peter’s Roman Catholic Chapel 1828, now The Mission. Very probably named for King George IV. Off High Street.

George’s Court. Before 1847. Origin unknown, probably the owner of the properties in the court. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished in the 1950s.

Ginkgo Walk. About 1996. 9 addresses. Named for a tree in the arboretum of Hitchman’s Hydropathic establishment. A footpath off Tachbrook Street.

Glebe Place. 1879. 8 houses. Usually the land within an ecclesiastical parish set aside to support the priest. Leam Terrace. Unlikely but possibly earlier known as Railway Terrace

Gloucester Street. 1806. 24 addresses. Probably named for the Duke of Gloucester who visited the town in 1806. Off Bath Street.
No 6 is Listed Grade II; it has a rare example of a mansard roof in the town.

Goodfellow Street. DDDD Before 2015. 77 addresses. Named for Charles Augustus Goodfellow (1836-1915); he was awarded the Victoria Cross in October 1859 during the Indian Mutiny; he retired with the rank of Lieutenant-General; from 1895 he lived at Avonview, No 38 Warwick New Road. On part of site of the first Milverton Station and later the goods yard. Old Milverton Road.

Goodwood Close. XXXX. Not found. Probably related to the racecourse or Goodwood House.

Gordon Passage. Name agreed in 1852; renamed as Satchwell Place after 1951. Leads to the house of the Duke of Gordon built about 1800; he was an enthusiastic supporter of the spa town. Footpath off New Street.

Gordon Street. 1810. 59 addresses. Near to the house of the Duke of Gordon, an enthusiast of the spa town, see Gordon Passage. New Street.

Gosford Close. XXXX. Probable link to Archibald Acheson, 2nd Earl of Gosford – a friend of the then Governor of New South Wales George Gipps.

Graham Street, XXXX. Probable link to Robert Leveston Graham who was a photographer in Leamington.

Granada Way. 2018. 29 addresses. The Granada was a model of Ford car and Soans Garage which was on the site was a Ford main dealer.. New housing built on site of business premises. Off Soans Drive, off St Marys Road.

Grandborough Court. Possibly 1970s, DATE. 19 homes. Village near Rugby. Off Loxley Way.

Grange Mews. Before 1997. 12 addresses. Possibly built in the grounds of a house named The Grange. A block of flats at the west end, on the south side,of Beverley Road

Grange Road. 1949. 32 houses. On the site of Grange Farm, Lillington, which is now the site of Pine Court. Off Pound Lane.

Grange, The. See The Grange.

Granville Street (sometimes earlier referred to as Granville Road). 1901. 46 addresses. Origin unknown but reference has been found to a Dr Granville in the town. Off Campion Road.

Great Church Way. Before 1711. The name probably relates to proximity to Lillington Church and some ceremonial. An old name for part of Cubbington Road, Lillington.

Greatheed Road. 1903. 58 addresses. Bertie Greatheed was the resident at Guys Cliffe House, Warwick, who owned a great amount of land in this area of the town. Off Gaveston Road and on to Rugby Road.

Greenways, The. See The Greenways.

Grenfell Close. About 1970 to 1975. 14 homes. Possibly linked to Wilfred Grenfell (1865-1940), doctor and explorer. Off Ledbury Road, Sydenham.

Gresham Avenue. 1936. 85 addresses. Origin unknown; speculation about a place name in Norfolk or a possible link to Sir John Gresham who worked for Henry VIII and married Elizabeth Grenfell in 1553. End on connection to Leicester Street.

Gresham Place. 1945. 16 addresses. Origin unknown; see Gresham Avenue. Parallel to Gresham Avenue.

Greville Terrace. XXXX. Noted but not located.

Grosvenor Court. DATE. 18 flats. Possibly named because Lord Leigh of Stoneleigh Abbey married Lady Grosvenor; Grosvenor is also the family name of Dukes of Westminster. Kenilworth Road.

Grosvenor Road. Renamed in 1953; 40 homes. previously St Helens Road (Lower or East). Possibly named because Lord Leigh of Stoneleigh Abbey married Lady Grosvenor; Grosvenor is also the family name of Dukes of Westminster. Brunswick Street.

Grove Place. Before 1828. 46 addresses. Possibly named for a nearby landmark grove of trees. This was the site of brick kilns when Clemens Street was being built. Off Aylesford Street.

Grove Street. 1824. 74 addresses. Possibly named for a nearby landmark grove of trees. Warwick Street; Upper Grove Street to the north.
There is a Blue Plaque for Norman Painting, the actor who is remembered for The Archers, at No 28.

Gulistan Road. A Mews Road to Bertie Terrace until named about 1925. 21 addresses. Gulistan is a rose garden in Persian language and the book ‘Gulistan’ is a landmark in Persian literature. Off Union Road.

Gulliman’s Way. DDDD Before 1997. 19 homes. Associated with Mr Gulliman’s wharf beside a bridge on the canal. Off Radford Road.

Gundry Close. DDDD 1973. 12 addresses. Probably named for Frank Gundry, Mayor 1958 to 1959. Off Davidson Avenue, Radford Road.

Gunnery Terrace. 1871. 18 addresses. The most popular idea for the source for the name is that there was a connery, coneygre or warren of rabbits (reared for food) in the area and this became corrupted to Gunnery. An alternative is that there was a shooting range on the nearby land of Gunnery Farm. Rugby Road.

Guy Place. Before 1867. 8 addresses. From the legendary ‘Guy of Warwick’. Guy Street to Oxford Street. Sometimes referred to as East and West either side of Chandos Street.

Guy Street. 1827. 10 addresses in 2019. Probably named for the legendary ‘Guy of Warwick’. The Jolly Brewer pub and a school were in the street from time to time. Off Warwick Street.

Guy’s Cliffe Avenue. 1879. 110 addresses. Initially referred to as Guy’s Cliffe Road but the part to the north of Rugby Road was renamed as ‘Avenue’ in 1914. The land was owned by Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, Warwick. At one time there was an avenue of trees in the area heading in the general direction of that House. Off Rugby Road. Home of Leamington Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club.

Guy’s Cliffe Road. 1834. 24 addresses. The land was owned by Greatheed of Guys Cliffe House, Warwick. Off Rugby Road.

Guy’s Row. 1865. Probably an early name for Guy Place (see above).

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Haddon Road. 1952. 85 addresses. John Haddon was a partner in the Leamington Brewery in Lillington Avenue, 1840 until death in 1875; he lived at Eastnor House in Radford Road just beyond Leam Terrace East. Off Buckley Road.

Hadrian Close. About 1935. 30 addresses. Several streets on this estate have names with links to Scotland. Off Kinross Road.

Hall Road. Known simply as the mews road for the east side of Clarendon Square from 1834; some stables later converted to dwellings; renamed before 1927. 12 addresses. Name possibly related to nearby Beauchamp Hall on the corner with Beauchamp Avenue; now Kingsley School. Off Clarendon Avenue.

Hamilton Crescent. 1834. Possibly named for Duke of Hamilton. The street was described as Crescent until about 1848 when it became Hamilton Terrace. From the Parade.

Hamilton Terrace. 1834. 21 addresses. Possibly named for the Duke of Hamilton. The street was described as Hamilton Crescent until about 1848 when it became Terrace. Off the Parade.
It was the location of one of the first dispensaries in the town around 1886.
It has been the site of the divisional Police Station since 1968 but the entrance is now in Newbold Terrace. Police moved from the HQ in High Street which had been the Town Hall.
A Blue Plaque for Major Harry Gem, lawn tennis pioneer with JBA Perera, is on No 8.
Nos 10 to 38 (evens) are Listed Grade II –.

Hamm Way. Marked on map 1711 leading from the eastern end of Lillington Avenue towards Offchurch. Origin unknown. No longer exists in 2019.

Hampton Court. Before 1878; demolished 1959. Possibly named for the owner of the court. Off Park Street.

Hampton Grove. New street created about 1977 after the demolition of Hampton Street. 13 addresses. Possibly related to the royal palace Hampton Court. Off Comyn Street.

Hampton Street. 1866. About 28 houses in the original build. Demolished in phases from 1960 to 1970 and replaced by Hampton Grove. Name possibly related to the royal palace of Hampton Court. Off Comyn Street. Part of it is now an unnamed footpath.

Hanover Gardens. Apartments built about 1960 on site of No 76 Upper Holly Walk which was originally built about 1832. 21 addresses. Origin unknown; Hanover is the capital city of Lower Saxony in Germany.

Hanworth Close. DATE. 1953. 41 addresses. Named for Lord Hanworth who was Master of the Rolls (1923-1935) and, as Sir Ernest Pollock, he was MP for Warwick and Leamington from 1910 to 1923. Off Thursfield Road.

Harriet Street. Before 1835. Probably named for the wife of Matthew Wise who lived at the nearby Manor House. It was renamed Spencer Street. Off Bath Street.

Harrison Way. 2005. 4 business addresses. Bruce Harrison was the last editor of “The Morning News”, the local daily newspaper; it ceased production in 1991. Off Tachbrook Road.

Harvest Hill Close. About 1970 to 1975. 16 addresses. Origin unknown, possibly named for a local feature. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Haseley Close. 1953. 27 addresses. Village near Warwick; an alternative suggestion of origin is Haseley End. Off Redland Road.

Hastang Fields. About 1998 to 2002. 25 addresses. Named for an Anglo Saxon ruler and one-time Lord of the Manor of Whitnash. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Hawkes Cottages. XXXX. May be linked to Hawkes Farm on Harbury Lane.

Hawthorn Road. 1925. 14 addresses. Origin unknown; perhaps named for local trees; the initial proposal was to name it Back Road. Off Baker Avenue. Part of the second estate of council houses for the town.

Hazel Close. 1973. 17 addresses. Origin possibly for a local plant. Off Campion Road.

Heath Terrace. Named in 1863. 99 addresses. The street was built on an extensive area of uncultivated heathland. Off Union Road.
St Saviour’s Church built in 1871.

Heemstede Lane. 1987. 9 addresses. Named for a twin town in The Netherlands. Off Lillington Road.

Hellidon Close. 1984. 14 addresses. Village nearest to the source of the River Leam in Northamptonshire. Off Napton Drive.

Helmsdale Road. Adopted 1957. 50 addresses. One of several streets named with Scottish connections relevant to Eddie McGregor; Helmsdale is a village on the east coast of Sutherland. Off St Andrews Road.

Henley Road. 1851. 53 addresses. Possibly named for Henley-in-Arden. Off St Margaret’s Road.

Henry Place. XXXX. May be named for Dr Henry Jephson.

Henry Tandey Court. 1977-1978. 12 addresses. Named for Henry Tandey who was the most decorated private soldier in the First World War and was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions. Union Road.

Henry’s Row. Before 1847; probably demolished as early as 1933. Possibly named for the owner of the court. A court behind No 8 Satchwell Street.

Herbert Place. XXXX

Herbert’s Court. Before 1844. Possibly named for the owner of the Court. Off Lower Bedford Street along the rear of Regent Street buildings.

Hewitt’s Buildings. 1863. Probably named for the owner of the Court. A court in Oxford Row, off Oxford Street.

Hewitt’s Cottages. Demolished about 1959. Probably named for the owner of the Cottages. Off Hill Street.

Hewitt’s Place. Present in 1852; later renamed Hampton Court. Probably named for the owner of the Court. A court in Park Street.

Hidcote Close. 1986 to 1990. 20 addresses. A village in Gloucestershire, and Hidcote Bartrim is a National Trust garden, in Gloucestershire. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

High Street. This was a main road many centuries ago and became part of the Warwick-Northampton Turnpike in 1763 (the turnpike expired in 1871). It was earlier named as London Road and then Turnpike (Road) but the name High Street became usual around 1815. 122 addresses. High Street is a widespread name for a principal street in a community. The length of High Street has varied; the name may have been used for the full length from Tachbrook Road to the junction with Willes Road for a time. More recently it became Radford Road at the junction with Forfield Place and then from George Street at this present day (2019).
The Town Hall was in the street on the corner of Althorpe Street and a new version opened in 1830; it became the police station when the new town hall opened in 1884. It is now Listed Grade II.
The Crown Hotel had been a vicarage when it was built in about 1808; it became a hotel in 1814 or 1815 and closed in 1989. It is No 10 and is now Listed Grade II. The Guards Inn is also Listed Grade II at No 45; it is the Pig and Fiddle in 2019; it has also been the Queen Victoria.
The two earliest pubs in the town were in the street; they were the Bowling Green and the Dog (or Black Dog); they have disappeared. Sinkers Hotel opened about 1793; it became Copps Hotel in 1814; it was demolished and rebuilt in 1827; this version was demolished after a short life with the arrival of the railways in 1847.

Highcroft Crescent. 1971. 25 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Riversleigh Road, Milverton.

Highdown Road. 1975. 13 business addresses. Origin unknown. Off Berrington Road, Sydenham.

Highfield Terrace. 1881. 34 addresses. Origin possibly related to the elevation of the site; initial proposal was Highfield Road. Off Rugby Road.

Highland Road. 1927. 71 addresses. One of several streets in Lillington with names with Scottish connections; connected to the landowner, Eddie McGregor. Off Cubbington Road.

Hill Close. Adopted 1957. 9 addresses. This is an elevated site. Off Church Lane, Lillington.

Hill Street (1). Satchwell Street was known by this name before 1810 because it slopes up to the north. It is now the site of the Royal Priors shopping centre. Off Warwick Street.

Hill Street (2). 1863. 35 addresses. Climbs a hill; part of this street was earlier known as Creaking Hill. Off Leicester Street. See also Upper Hill Street.

Hill’s Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner of the Court. Tachbrook Street. Demolished DATE.

Hirsel Gardens. DATE 1980s. 3 or 4 addresses. Built in the garden of a house named Hirsel Lodge on Kenilworth Road; Hirsel is a significant house near Coldstream in Berwickshire. A short row of houses in Woodcote Road.

Hitchman Court. DATE. 27 addresses. Dr John Hitchman established and ran the Hydrotherapy premises nearby in St Helens Road which became the Royal Midland Counties Home. Hitchman Road.

Hitchman Mews. Probably 2000s, DATE. 24 addresses. Dr John Hitchman established and ran the Hydrotherapy premises nearby in St Helens Road which became the Royal Midland Counties Home. Off Hitchman Road.

Hitchman Road. 1890. 61 addresses. Until 1903 it was named Vicarage Road for the vicarage of St Johns church. Dr John Hitchman established and ran the Hydrotherapy premises nearby in St Helens Road which became the Royal Midland Counties Home. Off St Helens Road.

Holly Place. Before 1870. Holly Street was initially only to the west of Campion Terrace. When houses were built to the east, the street of five houses was named Holly Place. When more houses were built further to the east they were named Holly Street East. Comyn Street was later built in the gap. About 1906 the whole street was renamed Holly Street and renumbered. The name probably relates to holly trees in Holly Walk and Upper Holly Walk.

Holly Road. 1854. Name relates to holly trees in Holly Walk and Upper Holly Walk. This was the name initially given to that street adjoining Campion Terrace which was later named Princes Street.

Holly Street. 1846. 29 addresses. Name relates to holly trees in Holly Walk and Upper Holly Walk. Crosses Campion Terrace.

Holly Walk. 1818. 73 addresses. Plentiful planting of holly trees; many cut down when houses were built; about half a dozen survive. Off Willes Road. See also Upper Holly Walk.
Kingsley House (No 63) is Listed Grade II.
There is a Blue Plaque at No 60 in memory of William and James Renshaw, who were Wimbledon tennis champions.

Holt, The. See The Holt.

Home Close. This was the site of a farmhouse on the corner of Leam Terrace and Mill Street which was also known as Court’s Home Close in the Enclosure award of 1768. The name relates to a farm near to the village centre. It was replaced by Lady Huntingdon’s Chapel, manse and school in 1829 and that was later replaced by Urquhart Hall in 1905.

Hopton Crofts. 1985. 37 addresses. Mrs Hopton was the daughter of Benjamin Satchwell. Satchwell discovered, or helped to discover, the first commercial saline spring in the town which became Abbotts Baths. Note that this street was formally transferred from Old Milverton parish to Leamington in 2015. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Hornbeam Grove, earlier sometimes referred to as Hornbeam Close. About 1970 to 1975. 23 addresses. Named for the tree but no evidence found that it was prevalent in the area. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Horsepool Hollow. About 2003 to 2004. 26 addresses. Earlier sometimes referred to as Horse Pool Meadow. This was an old fieldname in the locality. Also adjacent to the Rad Brook and Holy Well where horses may have stopped to drink. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Howard Place or Howard’s Buildings. Before 1895. Probably used the owner’s name. Oxford Row, Oxford Street. Demolished.

Hurley Close. Before 1973. 12 addresses. Name of a village in North Warwickshire. Off Villiers Street.

Hyde Place. 1879. 36 addresses. There are several possibilities for the origin; a Mr Hyde was a benefactor of Dale Street chapel nearby; also the Earl of Clarendon was formerly Mr Hyde. Off Warwick Place. 

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Imperial Place. In 2003 this development replaced three detached houses dating from 1960; one had a stained-glass front door and was known as the Swan House. About 22 addresses. Origin uncertain, other than to sound grand and royal, chosen by Cala Homes, the developer. Lillington Road.

Inglewood Close. 1959. 7 addresses. Origin of name unknown. Off Cubbington Road.

Ingot Drive. 1996. This name was proposed for a development on the site of the Henry Griffiths jewel factory; it was not adopted and the new streets were actually named Sapphire Drive and Emerald Way. Off Queensway.

Innage Close. Named in 1958. One address. The name was suggested by Mr Willes. Origin unknown; a specialist meaning is the amount of liquid left in a partly-emptied container. See also Arnos Cottages. Off Willes Road.

Isambard Close. Name agreed in 2016, being built in 2019. About 16 addresses. Named for Isambard Kingdom Brunel who was engineer for the nearby Great Western Railway. Off Station Approach. SNN Isambard Kingdom Brunel was the prodigious 19th century engineer responsible for bringing the railway from Paddington (London) through Leamington into much of the West Midlands and Wales. Records show that Brunel stayed at the Regent Hotel.

Iven’s Court. Named before 1864. About 6 houses. The earlier name was Warwick Court. Probably named for the owner of the Court. Warwick Street. It is now named Warwick Court again. Houses demolished. 

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J

 

Near the Site of Rushmore Farm

Jenton Road. Before 1975. 9 businesses addresses. Origin unknown. Off Highdown Road, Sydenham.

Jephson Place. 1966. 8 addresses. Named in memory of Dr Henry Jephson, the great, possibly the greatest, supporter of the baths and the spa. On the site of No 79 Willes Road.

Joan’s Close. 1968 to 1970. 5 addresses. Named for Joan, wife of Arthur Tickle, farmer at Sydenham Farm. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

John Cullis Gardens. 2004. 42 addresses. John Cullis was a horticulturalist who designed and ran the Ranelagh Gardens as a public garden and a plant nursery off Brunswick Street from about 1811 to 1847; he died as one of the first victims of cholera in 1849. Site of Nos 58 and 60 Kenilworth Road.

John Street. 1828. 2 addresses. Unknown origin. Off Bedford Street.

John’s Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner of the court. Satchwell Street. Probably demolished in 1950s.

Johnson’s Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner of the Court. Satchwell Street. Probably demolished in 1950s.

Juno Drive. 1966. 4 business addresses. Origin not found; Juno was a Roman goddess, wife of Jupiter. Business premises off Queensway. 

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Keir Close. 1988. 51 addresses. Sir John Keir was a councillor in the 1920s and 1930s. Off Berenska Drive.

Keith Road. 1938. 30 addresses. One of several streets with Scottish connections from landowner Eddie McGregor. Off Melton Road.

Kelvin Road. 1958. 111 addresses. One of several streets with Scottish connections from the landowner Eddie McGregor. Off Stirling Avenue.

Kempton Crescent. 1974. 23 addresses. Connection of Kempton racecourse with training of racehorses on the site of Stud Farm. Off Valley Road.

Kendal Avenue. 1964. 7 addresses. One of several streets connected to the Lake District. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Kenilworth Road 01. This was the first Kenilworth Road which later became named Lillington Road; it ran from Cubbington Road to Sandy Lane. The name was changed in 1842 when the street from Lillington Avenue towards Kenilworth was built; this new street was initially referred to as New Kenilworth Road. Both streets were obviously named because they led to Kenilworth.

Kenilworth Road 02. 388 addresses. See Kenilworth Road 01 for the story. Many original houses have been demolished and replaced in the last 20 or 30 years. Off Clarendon Avenue to the town boundary and beyond.
Nine houses (Nos 20 to 28 evens) on the east side of the street are Listed Grade II and also the building on the corner of Clarendon Avenue which has variously been the Desmond Hotel and the Berni Royal Hotel.

Kenilworth Street. 1810. 81 addresses. Named for local town. Off Warwick Street. Several courts of houses were connected to the street.
Henry Tandey VC was born at Swain’s Building off this street.
Kinmond’s soft drink factory was in the street; it became a wholesale greengrocer and it is included as part of a development of retirement homes called Kinmond Court (see below).
No 12 and the Irwin Memorial Hall are Listed Grade II.

Kennan Avenue. 1931. 74 addresses. John Joseph Kennan (1872-1932), borough engineer. Off Bury Road on the Shrubland estate.

Kennedy Square. Name agreed in 1964. Opened by MP, John Hobson, in 1965. 82 addresses. Named for John Kennedy, President of USA, 1961 to 1963. Off King Street and Queen Street. Architect Sir Frederick Gibberd.

Kennett Road. 1935. Kennett is a river in Berkshire and Wiltshire. This was suggested as a name in the area of Northway but was not used.

Keswick Green. 1964. 17 addresses. One of several streets named for the Lake District. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Kilby Grove. About 1978 to 1982. 11 addresses. Named for Captain Arthur Kilby (1885-1915) because he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at the Battle of Loos at which he lost his life; his parents lived at Skelton House, Lillington Avenue. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Kiln Close. 1973. 4 addresses. Named for the kilns at the brickworks on the site from about 1830 to about 1955. Off Villiers Street.

King Street. 1836. 7 addresses. In a group of streets with royal or noble names. Off St Pauls Square.

Kingfishers Reach. About 1998 to 2002. 18 addresses. Romantic name and kingfishers are sometimes seen in the area of Rad Brook. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Kingland Drive. 1971. 23 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Riversleigh Road.

King’s Mews. 1808. Early name for the spread of stables on what became Livery Street (Regent Court). On the site of the Regent Hotel which was built 1818. These stables then became part of this new hotel. Probably simply sounded regal and important. The Parade.

Kingston Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 9 addresses. Origin uncertain, it may refer to the town in south-west London. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Kingsway. 1938. 58 addresses. Probably simply sounded regal and important. Off Tachbrook Road.

Kinmond Court. About 1873, converted 1995. 19 addresses. Named for the soft drink manufacturer which used to be on the site. Kenilworth Street.

Kinross Road. 1937. 162 addresses. One of several streets with Scottish connection from landowner Eddie McGregor. Lime Avenue.

Knightcote Drive. 1980. 9 addresses. On the site of Knightcote House; Knightcote is a hamlet in south Warwickshire. Off Warwick New Road. 

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Lambourn Crescent. About 1975 to 1978. 26 addresses. Name of a centre for the training and care of racehorses in West Berkshire. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Lamintone Drive. 1985. 25 addresses. Uses an old spelling of Leamington; probably taken from the Domesday Book (1086). Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Langdale Close. 1974. 23 addresses. Possibly named for a place in North Yorkshire. Off The Crest.

Lansdowne Circus. 1836. 23 addresses. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Off Willes Road.
Some of the grandest semi-detached houses in the town.
All the houses in the street, Nos 1 to 18, are Listed Grade II.
There is a Blue Plaque on No 10 stating that Nathaniel Hawthorne, American author, stayed there.

Lansdowne Crescent. 1835. 54 addresses. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Willes Road.
Nos 19 to 57 (odds) and the two pairs of gate piers are all Listed Grade II.

Lansdowne Place. 1826. About 16 addresses today. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. East side of the Parade from Warwick Street to Clarendon Avenue. Now part of the Parade (or locally called Upper Parade).
Many of the buildings have refurbished or even have new facades.
Nos 1 to 31 (odds) Parade are all Listed Grade II despite much restoration and butchery at ground-floor level.

Lansdowne Road. 1866. 15 addresses. Initially a mews road at the rear of the west side of Lansdowne Street or rear of Clarendon Street. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Off Leicester Street.

Lansdowne Street. 1837. 22 Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Off Willes Road.

Lansdowne Terrace. 1820; name disused after 1950. A row of 6 houses on the north side of Willes Road near Clarendon Street. Marquess of Lansdowne, Whig politician, closely involved with Great Reform Act 1832. Willes Road.
Nos 5 to 15 (odds) Willes Road are Listed Grade II.
Blue plaques for Frederick and Elizabeth Whitehead, who were artists, and Corporal William Amey who was awarded the Victoria Cross are at Nos 5 and 13 Willes Road, respectively, within this terrace.

Lawford Road. 1953. 20 addresses. Villages of Church Lawford and Long Lawford are near Rugby. Off St Margarets Road.

Lawn Terrace. Named Newbold Terrace from when it was built about 1838; renamed Lawn Terrace about 1868 but after objections this name was soon abandoned. There were about 6 addresses when it was named Lawn Terrace. Overlooked a wide are of grassland above the river, most of which remains. Willes Road.
Nos 26, 27, 34 and 37/38 are Listed Grade II.

Leam Cottages. Before 1904. Location not confirmed; possibly in Myton Road, Warwick, not Leamington. Demolition order 1958. Named for the river.

Leam Crescent. Not yet located. Possibly intended to be at Queensway Business Park at one time.

Leam Place. Named from about 1839 to 1875. Named for the river. A row of houses in Willes Road, possibly near Leam Terrace.

Leamside House. Originally built about 1870, converted in 2003. 9 addresses. Named for the river. Off Lucas Court, off Warwick New Road.

Leam Street. 1834. 30 addresses. Named for the river. Off St Marys Road. See also Lower Leam Street.

Leam Terrace. 1831. 323 addresses including Leam Terrace East. Named for the river. West from Willes Road. See also Leam Terrace East.
About 28 houses (Odds, 5 to 23, 29, 35 and 39; Evens, 16, 18, 30 to 42 and 48 to 68) and two sewer gas vent pipes on the north side are Listed Grade II.
It is unclear whether Leam Terrace East should be named as a separate street; the streets are numbered consecutively.

Leam Terrace East. 1834. 323 addresses including Leam Terrace. Named for the river. East from Willes Road. See also Leam Terrace. It is unclear whether Leam Terrace is the official name; the streets are numbered consecutively.
These are Listed Grade II – Odds, Nos 49 to 55, Evens, Nos 68 to 74.

Leam View. Before 1800. Clearly relates to the local river, although it is not clear what view the name relates to. A name seen on a map for the footpath on the west side of the Eagle Recreation Ground. It follows part of the route of the old Watery Lane on a footpath from Whitnash to Lillington.

Ledbury Road. About 1970 to 1975. No addresses because the street simply provides access to other streets. Town in Herefordshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Lee Road. 1936. 59 addresses. Named for councillor Mr. Frederick William Hobill Lee. J.P., well-known architect, or Councillor Lee. Off Bury Road, Shrubland estate.

Leicester Court. DATE 1980? 17 addresses. Named for the city or Lord Leicester of Kenilworth Castle. Off Leicester Street.

Leicester Lane. Before 1711. 74 addresses. Named for the city or Lord Leicester of Kenilworth Castle; this street leads in the direction of that city. Extension of Lillington Road.

Leicester Street. Before 1838. 175 addresses. On an early map it is named Victoria Street; the extension up the Campion Hills was indicated on some plans as planned to turn to the south but in the event it turned north about 1945 to lead into Gresham Avenue. Named for the city or for Lord Leicester of Kenilworth Castle. Clarendon Street.
St Pauls church and the adjoining Church House and Parochial Rooms are Listed Grade II.

Leighton Close. 1961. 32 addresses. Origin unknown; possibly a connection to Leighton Buzzard. Off Oakridge Road.

Lillington Avenue. From 1833. 138 addresses. Part of road to Rugby from before 1605 and part of a turnpike from 1818 to 1878. Named because it leads to Lillington. Extension from the Rugby Road to a junction with Lillington Road.
This was the site of Leamington Brewery from 1839 to about 1970.

Lillington Close. 1939. 40 addresses. Named for the village. Off Church Lane.

Lillington Lane. Before the individual streets were named around 1810 this was the informal name for the route from High Street, Leamington Priors, by way of Bath Lane, what became Regent Grove/Hamilton Terrace, Clarendon Street and Lillington Road to Lillington. Named for the destination village.

Lillington Mews. About 1910. Probably stables for horses. Named for the village. Location not yet identified.

Lillington Place. A map of 1841 marks this as that part of the street from Beauchamp Avenue to Lillington Avenue that is now part of Kenilworth Road which was named in 1842. Named for the village.

Lillington Road. The street from Cubbington Road to Sandy Lane which is now part of Lillington Road was named Kenilworth Road until 1842. 323 addresses. It has not been determined what the name of the street from Clarendon Street to Cubbington Road was before 1842. The length from Clarendon Street all the way to Sandy Lane was certainly named Lillington Road from 1842. Named for the village.
A notable feature is the Centre Oak at the junction with Lillington Avenue.

Lime Avenue. This street provided access to Manor Farm from before 1769. It was laid out as a street and the section to Farm Lane was named from about 1906. 108 addresses. Probably named for local trees. Off Cubbington Road.

Linden Avenue or Walk. This is now the name for the footpath alongside the Pump Room Gardens from the Pump Room up the Parade and along Dormer Place. This path and Dormer Place have had several names including The Mall and The Promenade around 1815. Named for the trees which are also known as limes (but they do not produce the lime fruit).

Linkway. Built about 1968. 2 addresses. This street provided a link from Westlea Road through to Queensway. It is now a cul-de-sac for vehicles. Westlea Road, Shrubland estate.

Littleworth Croft. About 1998 to 2002. 21 addresses. Probably named for a hamlet between Hampton on the Hill and Norton Lindsey. Earlier suggestions for the name were Littleworth Headland and Littleworth Meadow. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Livery Street. Livery stables near this site from about 1808 were known as King’s Mews. The very short cul-de-sac from Regent Street to the rear of the mews was named as Livery Street from before 1835 when the Queens Cross pub was opened. 103 addresses. Origin from the connection with horses and stables. The stables became an adjunct to the Regent Hotel when it was built and was later servicing motor vehicles under the name Regent Garage. The street opened from the Parade to Regent Street about 2004. It is also known as Regent Court shopping and restaurant area. It is mainly a pedestrian area but there is vehicle access to part of it from Regent Street.
There is access to blocks of flats dating from about 2004 named Regent House, Victoria House, Augusta House, Napoleon House, Leopold House and Edward House. Another block named Wellington House has access from Regent Grove.
It is partly in between the Regent Hotel which is Listed Grade II* and the Town Hall which is Listed Grade II.

Llewellyn Road. Named about 1910. On the site of South Leamington Pleasure Grounds. 61 addresses. According to one source it was named for Rev T Llewellyn but that has not yet been confirmed. Off Brunswick Street.

Lockheed Close. About 1989. Named for the nearby factory and the football team which played on the ground on the site. Off Brakesmead, off Tachbrook Road.

London Road (1). Early name for High Street and Radford Road when it was part of the turnpike. This was a main route to London. The name High Street was widely used after 1815 but a reference has been noted of the name London Road as late as 1849 along what is now named Radford Road.

London Road (2). There is one report that this was an early name for Windsor Place. Off Bedford Street.

Longfield Road. About 1975. 25 business addresses. Origin unknown. Street in the business area of Sydenham off Berrington Road.

Longleat Grove. About 1986 to 1990. 17 addresses. Named for a Stately Home in Wiltshire. Calder Walk, Sydenham.

Lonsdale Road. About 1927. 40 addresses. Name possibly relates to Kirkby Lonsdale, now in Cumbria. Off Cubbington Road.

Loveday Drive. 1991. 9 addresses. Built on the playing fields of Kingsley School; Anne Loveday was Head of Kingsley School, 1909-1916. Off Fryer Avenue, off Northumberland Road.

Lower Avenue. This was one of the two private drives to the Manor House from Old Warwick Road. It existed before 1783. The Upper Avenue was some way to the west and was destroyed when the railways came. Lower Avenue became a public road before 1838. 17 addresses. The naming is obvious from the point of view of the owner of the house. The street now runs from Old Warwick Road/High Street to Spencer Street/Avenue Road.

Lower Leam Street. Probably about 1838. 13 addresses. Named for the river. From St Mary’s Road to Leam Terrace; the western extension of Leam Street.
No 1 is Listed Grade II.

Lower Union Parade. About 1812. An early reference to that part of the Parade from the river to Regent Street. The use of the word Lower is fairly clear but the word Union is less clear. See Parade for a more complete story of the naming.

Lower Villiers Street. About 1850. 3 addresses. Probably recognition of nobility, Villiers was the family name of the Duke of Buckingham. Clarendon Street to Hill Street. See also Villiers Street, which is the extension towards the east.

Loxley Way. About 1979. 19 addresses. Local village near Wellesbourne. Pound Lane to Whitacre Road.

Lucas Court. The original houses were before 1870; redevelopment and new name from about 2003. On the site of Nos 7, 9, 11, 13 Warwick New Road. No 7 was South Bank. 67 addresses. Named for Eric Lucas who was Mayor from 1956 to 1958. A collection of apartment blocks between Warwick New Road and the river. Some of them were already established houses including Brooklands, South Bank and Leamside Houses and others were purpose-built including Beech and Oak Houses.

Lydstep Grove. About 1964 to 1968. 15 addresses. Probably named for Lydstep Haven in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Lyndon Court. About 1983. 5 addresses. Origin unknown. South side of Hyde Place. Rear of No 6 Warwick New Road.

Lynwood Walk. About 1970 to 1975. 9 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham. 

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Mall. About 1808. The early name for Dormer Place or Linden Walk or Avenue. Origin probably to mimic a major street in London. Off Parade.

Maltings, The. See The Maltings.

Manners Place. Before 1837. Probably a court owned by Mr Manners. One record found. Brunswick Street. Demolished DATE.

Manor Court. After 1973, before 1991. Block of apartments built next to the Manor House. 46 addresses. Named for the Manor House which was adjacent to the site. Avenue Road. Manor Court was built on the site of the first lawn tennis court in the world.

Manor Farm estate. Housing began about 1928. Farm belonged with the Lillington Manor House. Farm before 1711. Lime Avenue, Lillington.

Manor Road. About 1900. 44 addresses. Named for Lillington Manor House nearby. From Lime Avenue to Elm Road.

Maple Road. 1922. 16 addresses. Earlier proposal for the name was Maple Avenue. Perhaps named for nearby trees. Baker Avenue.

Marcroft Place. About 1970 to 1975. 2 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Market Corner. Advertised for sale or let in 1923 and this date is shown on the building. 10 addresses. Origin unknown other than an appropriate name for a block of shops. The north-east corner of Tachbrook Road and Tachbrook Street.

Market Street. Before 1833. Obviously related to the market nearby. The street ran from Russell Street to Tavistock Street across Covent Garden Market. It is now the site of a multi-storey car park; note that this was not on the route of the existing street (2019) which is further south and appears to be an unnamed service road for premises in Warwick Street.

Marlborough Drive. About 1986 to 1990. 62 addresses. Probably named for the Duke of Marlborough or the town in Wiltshire. Off Calder Walk, Sydenham.

Marloes Walk. About 1964 to 1968. 16 addresses. Probably named for a beach in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Marston Close. About 1970, DATE. 24 addresses. Probably named for Priors Marston in Warwickshire; could be linked to the Battle of Marston Moor in 1644. Alongside Black Lane, Lillington at Campion Hill.

Mason Avenue. About 1953. 230 addresses. Origin Dr Harold Mason, Mayor 1910-1911. Off Valley Road, Lillington.

Mathe Croft (or Mathecroft on streetsign). About 1982 to 1986. 19 addresses. Origin was a field name at time of enclosure in 1768. Off Moncrieff Drive, Sydenham.

Mathie Street. Before 1834. Origin was probably a field name at time of enclosure in 1768. Continuation of Buchanan Street to the east; possibly demolished for the building of the railways.

Maurice Mead Court. About 1989. 12 addresses. Maurice W Mead was a photographer in the town around 1951. Shrubland Street.

Maxstoke Gardens. 1958. 35 addresses. Maxstoke is a place with a moated castle in north Warwickshire. Tachbrook Road

Mayfield Close. About 1964 to 1968. 12 addresses. Mayfield is a village in East Sussex. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Meadow Close. DATE, before 1973. 29 addresses. Simply named for a field. Off Epsom Road, Lillington.

Melbourne Street. On a map dated 1852. Probably named for the prime minister, Lord Melbourne, about 1835. Early name for what is now Oxford Place, off Oxford Street.

Melford House. Before 1888. Origin unknown. South side of Milverton Hill.

Melton Cottages. DATE. Demolished 1932. Origin unknown, possibly named for the owner. Park Street.

Melton Road. About 1934. 45 addresses. Probably named for the town of Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire. Off Lime Avenue.

Mews Road 01. This was a generic name given to several streets at the rear of significant streets. Originally ‘mews’ were stables or homes for servants; later many were converted to homes or new buildings were built to look like stables. They included Rosefield Street which was at the rear of Newbold Terrace; Hall Road which was at the rear of the eastern part of Clarendon Square; Morrell Street at the rear of Kenilworth Road and Morton Street at the rear of both Beauchamp Avenue and Clarendon Avenue. Only one Mews Road remains with this name, off Guys Cliffe Road; see Mews Road 02. They were each built at the same time as the houses on the relevant street.

Mews Road 02. Probably dates from the building of Warwick Place about 1834. 4 addresses. Simply refers to a service road behind properties on another road although the origin was referring to homes converted from stables. The only surviving mews road with this name is off Guys Cliffe Road. It was a mews road for both Warwick Place and Warwick new Road.

Milford Court. Probably about 1960. 9 addresses. Origin unknown. Mill Road.

Mill End. Mentioned in a rate book of 1813. Presumably related to the mill in Mill Street. Nothing else is currently known.

Mill Gardens. 1898 when the council bought the mill and adjoining land. Named for mill, the last owner was Thomas Oldham. Mill Road.

Mill House Close. 1964.10 addresses. Named for mill at rear on the River Leam. Off Warwick New Road.

Mill House Drive. 1964. 10 addresses. Named for mill at rear on the River Leam. Off Warwick New Road.

Mill House Terrace. 1964. 17 addresses. Named for mill at rear on the River Leam. Off Warwick New Road.

Mill Lane. Early name for Mill Street (see below).

Mill Pond Meadows. About 1998 to 2002. 13 addresses. Reference to the mill on Rad or Radford Brook (now becoming known as Whitnash Brook). Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Mill Road. Before 1834. 34 addresses. Named for the mill which used to be nearby. Initially the mews road at rear of Leam Terrace. Off Willes Road.

Mill Street. Earlier named Mill Lane; before 1783. Renamed about 1875. 8 addresses. Named for the mill nearby. Leam Terrace.

Mill Walk. In early times this formed part of the footpath or drove road from Whitnash to Lillington. The name now refers to the path from Mill Bridge to Newbold Terrace passing bridges beneath paths in the Jephson Gardens. No addresses. Named for the old mill.

Millhouse Close. Proposal which became Mill House Close.

Millhouse Drive. Proposal which became Mill House Drive.

Millhouse Terrace. Proposal which became Mill House Terrace.

Milverton Crescent. 1827. 30 addresses. Named for the village of Old Milverton. Beauchamp Hill to Rugby Road.
Nos 19 to 25 and Nos to 26 to 31 are Listed Grade II.

Milverton Crescent West. 1837. 26 addresses. Named for the village of Old Milverton. The path along the front doors of the houses is a footpath; access by vehicles is from the road at the rear. Beauchamp Hill to Rugby Road.

Milverton Hill. Before 1835. 28 addresses. Named for the village of Old Milverton. End on meeting with Portland Place West to Warwick New Road. Site of Riverside House, current headquarters of Warwick District Council.

Milverton Lane. The correct name today is Old Milverton Lane. It leads to Old Milverton.

Milverton Lodge. 1960s DATE. 16 addresses. Named for the village. Off Milverton Crescent West.

Milverton Terrace. Before 1835. 66 addresses. Named for village of Old Milverton. Church Hill to Warwick Place.
Nos 10 to 14 (evens) are Listed Grade II.

Moncrieff Drive. About 1982 to 1986. 19 addresses. Origin unknown but Moncrief was a demigod in early religion in Scotland. Chesterton Drive to Cobden Avenue.

Monkey Steps. Before 1881, DATE. The name probably relates to the need to climb the hill and the earlier unmade form of the footpath. A footpath with 15 steps from Villiers Street to Chestnut Square at the north end of the old brickworks.

Montrose Avenue. Initially proposed 1927, built 1954. 95 addresses. Scottish town name for landowner Eddie McGregor. Lime Avenue to Telford Avenue.

Morrell Street. Initially a mews road to Kenilworth Road from before 1837. Renamed before 1863. 10 addresses. Named for Moreton Morrell at the suggestion of a retired vicar of that village who lived in Beauchamp Avenue. Clarendon Avenue to Beauchamp Avenue.

Morris Street. 1810. Early name for Windsor Place; renamed about 1847. Named for local landowner John Morris. Bedford Street to Windsor Street.

Morton Street. Initially a mews road to Kenilworth Road from before 1837. Renamed before 1863. 59 addresses. Named for Moreton Morrell at suggestion of a retired vicar of that village who lived in Beauchamp Avenue (note variation of spelling of Morton). Morrell Street to Clarendon Street.

Moss Close. DATE. This was the name of a house in Guys Cliffe Avenue; now part of Cranesthorpe Court. Origin unknown.

Moss Street. Before 1834. Origin unknown. Off Althorpe Street. It has almost disappeared in 2019.

Mosspaul Close. After 1964. 24 addresses. Probably named for a place on the border of Scotland near Hawick. Off Windermere Drive.

Mount Pleasant. 1936. Occasionally used as a name for Campion Hill. Possibly named to make it sound more appropriate for environmental protection.

Mountford’s Court. Before 1852, demolished about 1927. Probably named for the owner, Mr Mountford. A court off Satchwell Street.

Mulberry Close. 1993. 31 addresses. Named for a variety of tree. Off Whitethorn Drive, near Gresham Place.

Murdoch Court. 2019. About 16 addresses. Possibly named for William Murdoch, engineer (1754-1839), a member of the Lunar Society in Birmingham. Off Station Approach.

Myton Road. Before 1783. 17 addresses. Westward extension of Old Warwick Road. Part of the main road from Warwick to Daventry which became a turnpike. None of the street carriageway is strictly within Leamington but some premises on the north side are within the boundary of Leamington. Named for the hamlet of Myton.

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Napton Drive. 1984. 60 addresses. Named for a local village. Off Whitacre Road.

Nash’s Road. 1820. An early name for Newbold Road which became Willes Road. Named for Thomas Nash, an architect employed by Edward Willes. From Clarendon Street to Radford Road. See Willes Road.

A Street with no name – Neilston Street

Neilston Street. Before 1831; sometimes referred to as Nelson Street in the early years. 28 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Althorpe Street.

Nevill Close. About 1951. 42 addresses. Origin unknown; the sixteenth Earl of Warwick was Richard Neville, known as Warwick the Kingmaker, but his name was spelt slightly differently. Off The Approach.

New Brook Street. On the site of Brook Street which was demolished and rebuilt about 1957. 66 addresses. Named for Bins Brook which ran from Lillington through the area and which has been culverted; the place at which the culvert runs into the River Leam can be seen at Riverside. Regent Street to Warwick Street.

New Market Place. There is reference to this in a newspaper of 1828. At that time the main market in the town was off Bath Street in Bath Place. It must relate to a market of some kind.

New Market. There is reference to New Market in a Directory of 1871. It probably related to Covent Garden Market or an early name for Market Street in that area. It must relate to a market of some kind. Off Warwick Street and Tavistock Street.

New River Walk. Probably 1862. No addresses. Footpath alongside the south side of the river from York Bridge by the Pump Room Gardens to Adelaide Bridge. The length parallel to York Road is sometimes referred to as York Walk or Promenade. Nowadays it is simply referred to as River Walk.

New Street. Present in 1838 as a mews road to the western part of Leam Terrace. Earlier it was possibly a footpath to Radford Semele which passed the cottage home of Benjamin Satchwell. It was probably not named as New Street until about 1870. 86 addresses. Origin of name unclear; for some reason the word ‘new’ must have seemed appropriate when it was named. Off George Street/Mill Street. Site of two schools which now have other uses and a burial ground which now has gravestones around the walls.
There is a Blue Plaque for Benjamin Satchwell who was deeply involved in the early development of the spa on Satchwell Granary.

Newbold Archery Ground. Opened 1834 at the east end of what is now Jephson Gardens. Named for the proximity of Newbold Comyn and owned by the residents, the Willes family.

Newbold Beeches. A house built about 1862. Name probably originates from local trees and the vicinity of Newbold Comyn. Demolished 1975. Some way up Campion Hills above Upper Holly Walk

Newbold Comyn. This is a large area of land named from medieval times. Comyn was a family name around 1200, the land was never a common. It was enclosed at an early date and was probably always owned by one family, latterly the Willes for about 400 years. North east of the town, north of the river.

Newbold Comyn House. The base of the Willes family from about 1800 until 1943. Comyn was a family name around 1200; the land was never a common. Access was south from Upper Holly Walk; Fernhill Drive includes the site of the house. Demolished in 1965.

Newbold Cottages. About 1879. 9 addresses. Named for Newbold Comyn. A row of cottages on the north side of Rosefield Street near Newbold Place. Demolished DATE; now a car park.

Newbold Crescent. Proposal about 1878. Named for Newbold Comyn. This appears to have been the name proposed for the new street to be built curving to the south from the east end of Leicester Street; it was never built; the extension eventually was built curving to the north and joins Gresham Avenue.

Newbold Gardens. About 2015. 30 addresses. Named for Newbold Comyn. Flats built partly on the site of Campion School in Leicester Street.

Newbold Grove. This name is referred to from 1854 to 1897 but the location has not been determined. Named for Newbold Comyn.

Newbold Lodge. About 1834. This was probably a lodge somewhere in Jephson Gardens occupied by architect John George Jackson. One reference names the cottage as Strawberry Cottage at the north side of the Jephson Gardens at the boundary with the Parade. Named for Newbold Comyn.

Newbold Place. 1834. Originally up to 16 addresses on east and west side. 9 addresses remain on the west side. Named for Newbold Comyn. Off Rosefield Street.

Newbold Road. An early name for Willes Road. From about 1837 to about 1874. Named for Newbold Comyn. It was earlier named Nash’s Road.

Newbold Square. For a few years from about 1825 this was the name used for what is now Christ Church Gardens. Named for Newbold Comyn.

Newbold Street. About 1826. 22 addresses. Named for Newbold Comyn. From Hamilton Terrace to Newbold Terrace.
The following are Listed Grade II – Odd Nos 3 to 17, Even Nos 2 (Grove House), 4 to 16, Newbold Tavern, now the Drawing Board pub.

Newbold Terrace. Laid out from 1824 but houses were built very slowly and they were never all completed. 90 addresses. Named for Newbold Comyn. Off the Parade. A new block is being built on the corner of Newbold Street in 2019.
Location of the Royal Spa Centre on the site of Harrington House.
Location of the Justice Centre.
Nos 23, 24 and 25 are Listed Grade II.
There is a Blue Plaque for Sidney Flavel senior, businessman, at Nos 24 and 25.

Newbold Terrace East. Probably the access to Newbold Comyn House from an early date. Houses built in the street from 1830. Named Lawn Terrace for a short time around 1850 to 1869. 65 addresses. Named for Newbold Comyn. Off Willes Road.
Nos 26, 27, 34, 37 and 38 are Listed Grade II.

Newbury Close. About 1970 to 1975. 14 addresses. Named for the town in Berkshire. Off Stanton Road, Sydenham.

Newdigate. About 1982 to 1986. 15 addresses. Named for place near Nuneaton. Off Moncrieff Drive, Sydenham. Newdigate was the site of a colliery which was closed in 1982.

Newgale Walk. About 1964 to 1968. 12 addresses. Possibly named for a beach in Pembrokeshire as with several other streets on the Sydenham estate. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Newland Road. 1958. Original proposal was Newland Close. 92 addresses. Probably named for the fact it was the first building on the land. Off Mason Avenue.

Newnham Road. About 1964. 48 addresses. Newnham is a small hamlet in Aston Cantlow; it is also the name of villages in Bedfordshire or Cambridgeshire. Off Valley Road.

Nightingale Court. Before 1973, DATE. 7 addresses. Probably named for Basil Nightingale, artist who lived locally for over 20 years. Leam Terrace East.

Nightingale House. DATE. Probably named for Basil Nightingale, local artist. Lillington Avenue.

Norfolk Street. 1871. 34 buildings. Named for the county or the Duke of Norfolk; probably the former because Suffolk Street is nearby. Off Leicester Street.

North Villiers Street. 1872. 43 addresses. Origin unknown; probably named for the prominent aristocratic Villiers family. Off Upper Hill Street.

Northcote Street. 1880. 19 addresses. Probably named for Sir Stafford Northcote, a Conservative politician around 1870. Off Willes Road.

Northumberland Court. Name agreed in 2001. 45 addresses. Named for the Duke of Northumberland or the old county. South side of Northumberland Road.

Northumberland Lodge. Name agreed in 2001. 12 addresses. Named for the Duke of Northumberland or the old county. Northumberland Road.

Northumberland Mews. Name agreed in 2001. 4 addresses. Named for the Duke of Northumberland or the old county. Northumberland Road.

Northumberland Park. About 1995. Named for the Duke of Northumberland or the old county. North side of Northumberland Road. The street which leads to Northumberland Mews and Northumberland Lodge.

Northumberland Road. About 1875. 197 addresses. Named for the old county, or possibly the Duke of Northumberland. Off Kenilworth Road.

Northway. About 1935. 50 addresses. Simply named for the direction of the street. Off Grosvenor Road.

Norton Cottages. About 1905. Probably named for the owner. Off Hill Street. Demolished before 1991.

Nursery Lane. 1952. 24 addresses. Possibly named for a plant nursery in the vicinity; much of the land was allotment gardens. Off Staunton Road. 

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Oak Place. DATE, possibly 1960. 4 addresses. Name of the tree. A terrace of four houses on Willes Road, adjacent to No 87.

Oak Tree Close. 1965. 8 addresses. Named for the Midland Oak (Centre of England) nearby. The street originally had direct access to Lillington Road; access is now via Heemstede Lane.

Oakfield House. DATE. 53 addresses. Original houses demolished and 53 sheltered flats built about 1983. Origin related to oak trees. Nos 49-51 Binswood Avenue, corner of Arlington Avenue.

Oakridge Road. 1961. 18 addresses. Origin probably generic. Original name proposed was Oakridge Close. Off Parklands Avenue.

Oaks Corner. DATE. House demolished and 14 flats built about 1978. Probably named for the Midland Oak nearby. The south-east corner of crossroads of Arlington Avenue and Lillington Avenue.

Oaks, The. DATE. 24 addresses. Perhaps named for nearby trees. Warwick Place.

Offa Road. 1928. 52 addresses. Origin for Offa, Anglo-Saxon King of Mercia; he is also related to the nearby village of Offchurch. Off Waverley Road, Rushmore estate.

Old Mill House. 1964. Named for the mill at the rear on the River Leam. Early name for the three streets known as Mill House Terrace etc. Off Warwick New Road near the Portobello bridge.

Old Milverton Lane. Before 1800. This has probably existed for at least 1,000 years. Renamed Old Milverton Road about 1908. 25 addresses. The lane leading to Old Milverton. Off Rugby Road.

Old Milverton Road. This has probably existed for at least 1,000 years. Named Old Milverton Lane before 1908. 25 addresses. The street leading to Old Milverton. Off Rugby Road.

Old Warwick Road. Part of the Warwick to Daventry turnpike between Tachbrook Road and Princes Drive. 55 business addresses. Named as it is a main route to Warwick. Acquired the title ‘old’ when the Warwick New Road was built and named about 1827 but was not found on a map until 1881. Originally the official Warwick Turnpike from about 1763 until 1853 or 1871.

Onslow Croft. About 2001. 15 addresses. F W Onslow was a head of Leamington College in the twentieth century; it may be of interest that, in general, it is a boy’s name meaning “from the zealous one’s hill”; perhaps appropriate for a street built on a school playing field.
SNN Outstanding sportsman. Off College Drive, off Woodcote Road.

Orchard Court. About 2001 or 1960s. 8 addresses. Possibly on or near the site of an orchard. No 27 Kenilworth Road.

Orchard Street. Before 1832. Built on the orchard of Mr Wise of Manor House. At one time it ran between Lower Avenue and Bath Lane (later Street). The foundations of the bridge for the first railway were dug in the street and it ceased to exist.

Orion Way. 2019. 3 addresses. Orion was a type of Ford car and Soans garage on the site was a Ford main dealer. New housing built on site of business premises. Off Ramsey Road,

Oswald Road. About 1873. 11 addresses. Origin possibly Oswald Milne, Master of Hounds; otherwise the name is of Anglo-Saxon origin combining the concepts of god and power or rule. Off Rugby Road.

Otters Rest. About 1998 to 2002. 21 addresses. Reference to the otters which were seen in the Rad Brook area and may have returned; possibly refers to a specific stone used as a perch by otters beyond the end of the street. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Overell Close. An early name proposed for Overell Grove.

Overell Grove. DATE. 10 addresses. Named for L D Overell, a solicitor who was town clerk when the corporation was created in 1875; the first record found of a solicitor named Overell in the town was in George Street in 1846. Off Avonlea Rise.

Oxford Place. Named from 1865; previously Melbourne Street from about 1852. 2 addresses. Probably named for the city. Off Oxford Street.

Oxford Road. Probably a reference in error to Oxford Row or Street.

Oxford Row. 1830. 1 address. Probably named for the city. Off Oxford Street.

Oxford Street. Before 1828. 50 addresses. Probably named for the city. Off Warwick Street. 

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Packington Place. Possibly before 1800. 24 addresses. Named for Packington Hall, the residence of the Lord of the Manor, Earl of Aylesford, near Great Packington. Off High Street.

Packwood Close. About 1986 to 1990. 33 addresses. Named for Packwood House, National Trust property near Lapworth. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Padmore Court. 1968 to 1970. 18 addresses. Possibly named for Padmore House at Whippingham, Isle of Wight; ‘padde’ meant ‘toad’ in Old English. Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Page’s Buildings. Before 1901; possibly an existing court was renamed. demolished about 1956. Probably named for the owner. Off Kenilworth Street.

Palace Yard. Before 1901; possibly an existing court that was renamed. It was probably near the Palace Inn which was in Satchwell Street at No 36 from 1898-1976. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished in 1950s.

Parade. This street has had a quite bewildering variety of names. It is easier to examine it in three parts.
1. The lower part from Victoria Bridge over the river to Regent Street was built first. The part from the bridge to Regent Grove was part of the much older Lillington Lane.
Building of the new street began about 1808 from near the Regent Street end. It was first referred to as Union Street or Union Row but by 1818 it was named Union Parade or Lower Union Parade. The name Row probably related to the row of houses built on the western side from about 1808; the name Parade was a common name for a major street in a town; the origin of the word Union is less clear; in other streets it referred to the Poor Law Union but this does not appear to be appropriate; Union may simply relate to the street uniting the old village with the new buildings.
After 1830 it was named Lower Parade. In 1873 the whole run of the street was renamed the Parade and it was all renumbered as one street.
2. The middle section from Regent Street to Warwick Street was built next. It also began about 1808 at the Regent Street end. It was named Upper Union Street. It became Upper Parade around 1840 and then again became part of the Parade in 1873. The word Upper clearly relates to the fact that the Parade rises quite steeply when moving from south to north.
3. The higher part from Warwick Street to Clarendon Avenue was finally built from about 1820. The west side was named York Terrace and the east side was Lansdowne Place. The street became part of the Parade from 1873. It is currently occasionally referred to as ‘upper’ Parade; this can be confusing because the middle section was formerly Upper Parade (see above).
There now about 230 addresses in the Parade. Note that the formal name does not use the definite article.
The following buildings on the Parade are Listed Grade II –
Odd Numbers, Nos 1 to 31, Nos 33 to 47, 49, 49A, 51, 51A, 53, 53A, 55, 57, 63, 65, 67, 71, Lloyds Bank listed as No 85 Regent Street, No 77 Regent Hotel, Town Hall, Statue of Queen Victoria, Obelisk to Henry Bright, War Memorial, North and South Lodges, Victoria Bridge;
Even Numbers, Nos 12 to 42, 44, 58, 58A, 66, 68, 74, 92, 92A, 98 to 104, 112 to 120, 122, 124, 126, 132 to 136, 138, 144, 144A, 146, 148 and 150, 152 to 170, Royal Pump Room and Baths.
There are Blue Plaques for Henry Peach Robinson, a local photographer who was recognised nationally, at No 60, and Dr Henry Jephson, the great supporter of the spa, at No 118.

Parish End. About 2006. 45 addresses. Near the old stone for the border between the parishes of Whitnash and Leamington. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Park Court. Unsure whether this relates to a court of the 1800s; Probably a later name. Derived from the name of the street. Off Park Street.

Park Drive. Built 1921 by the council using unemployed people. Only one address at present. Origin clearly relates to Victoria Park. The street around the south side of Victoria Park, an extension of Avenue Road.

Park House. About 1900. Derived from the name of the street. Block of 15 flats at No 17 Park Road.

Park Place. 01. 1852. Demolished about 1932. Name relates to the name of the adjoining street. A court off Park Street.

Park Place 02. 1856 to 1909. Origin unknown; the lands (park) of Shrubland Hall were opposite. Name for Nos 21 to 37 Tachbrook Road.

Park Road. The street may have existed before 1841, but buildings began about 1871. 80 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Lillington Road.

Park Street. 1810. 64 addresses. Origin unknown; possibly relates to park area of Jephson Gardens. Regent Street to Warwick Street. There was a campaign to have the name changed to Park Lane when Royal Priors was built but this was not successful; the intention was to reflect the prestige of the street of that name in London.

Parklands Avenue. 1949. 90 addresses. Appears to be a theme in the area because many adjoining streets have the names of parks. Cubbington Road.

Parmiter House. About 1990. DATE. This was the name of flats which were demolished and new block of 51 sheltered homes named Arlington Lodge was built about 2016. Origin unknown. In site of Nos 15 to 19 Arlington Avenue.

Payne Close. 1988. 8 addresses. Probably named for Jack Payne, a nationally known dance-band leader who was born in Leamington in 1899. Off Berenska Drive.

Pearson’s Cottages. Before 1878. About three cottages, later demolished around 1951, the site is vacant land in 2019. The cottages were probably named for the owner. An alley alongside No 32 Beaconsfield Street led to the cottages.

Pebble Island Way. About 1998 to 2002. 35 addresses. An area on a bend in the Rad Brook where children played. Off Chesterton Drive, Sydenham.

Pelham Close. One record but no location found.

Pembroke Court. DATE. 9 addresses. County town in Wales. Flats in Lillington Avenue.

Pendine Court. 1930s, DATE. 9 addresses. Place in South Wales; Pendine Sands are famed for their use for the breaking of land speed records. Off Warwick Place.

Pennystone Close. About 1968 to 1970. 4 addresses. Origin unknown; Penistone (note the spelling) is a place near Barnsley. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Penrith Close. 1965. 15 addresses. Place in Cumbria; several streets in the area are named for the Lake District. Off Ravensdale Avenue.

Percy Terrace. 1869. 12 addresses. The Percy family lived at Guys Cliffe House. Off Rugby Road.

Perkins’ Garden. Before 1852. Plant nursery off Avenue Road. Named for the owner. York Road (1893) and the Library were built on the site.

Philip Court. 1962. 8 addresses. Probably named for Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh; see also Edinburgh Crescent. Off Kingsway.

Pinders Court. 1850. Probably named for the owner. Off Park Street. Demolished DATE.

Pine Court. Before 1973. 33 addresses. Perhaps named for nearby tree; reports of a large tree in a brick bed. Cubbington Road. It occupies the site of the buildings of Grange Farm.

Pleasant Way. 1973. 14 addresses. A very pleasant name. Off Villiers Street.

Plymouth Place. Before 1856. 90 addresses. Named for the city in Devon. From Forfield Place to Farley Street

Portland Court. DATE. Named for adjoining street and Duke of Portland. Portland Street.

Portland House. 1828. 8 addresses. Named for Duke of Portland. Portland Street.

Portland Mews. 1832. 3 addresses. Named for Duke of Portland. Portland Street.

Portland Place. 1824. Named for Duke of Portland. Crosses Dale Street. See Portland Place East and Portland Place West.

Portland Place East. 1824. 49 addresses. Named for Duke of Portland. Dale Street to Augusta Place.
The following are Listed Grade II –
Odds, 9 and 13 to 19. Evens, Nos 34 to 48.

Portland Place West. 1824; the suffix West agreed in 1854. 51 addresses. Named for Duke of Portland. From Dale Street to end-on meeting with Milverton Hill.
There is a Blue Plaque for Malcolm Sayer, designer of the E-Type Jaguar motor car at No 26.
The following buildings are Listed Grade II –
Odds, No 7. Evens, Nos 4 to 32.

Portland Road. 1838. Named for Duke of Portland. Extension of Portland Place to the east of Augusta Place to Bedford Street. Now covered by St Peters multi-storey car park. Probably 8 or 9 addresses at some time. St Peters Road is not on the site of Portland Road.

Portland Row. 1845. A row of about 20 houses. Named for Duke of Portland. Between Portland Place West and the river. Built on land reclaimed when the river was straightened; now named Riverside. Demolished after 1950 and the site is used as part of a car park.

Portland Street. 1824. 145 addresses. Named for Duke of Portland. Portland Place East to Warwick Street.
The following are Listed Grade II
Odds, 1 to 5, 17 to 25, 31 to 41 and 47. Evens, 2 to 12 and 22 to 38.
A Blue Plaque for Samuel Thomas Wackrill, first Mayor of the new Borough in 1875, is at No 6.

Portland Terrace. This name was used from about 1845 to 1879. Named for Duke of Portland. The north side of Portland Place East, to the east of Portland Street.

Portway Close. About 1967 to 1970. 8 addresses. Probably named for the place on the western side of Warwickshire. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Pound Lane. Before 1730. 22 addresses. Location of the Pound for Lillington where stray animals were impounded awaiting reclaim. Off Cubbington Road, Lillington.

Powers Court. 1831. Original court of about 6 houses demolished probably in 1950s and a block of offices was built on the site. In 2017 these were demolished and a care home built called Gainsborough Hall. Origin probably the name of the owner of the court. Off Russell Street.

Prince Regent Court. 1988. About 39 addresses. Origin Prince Regent who visited the town. Off Charlotte Street.

Princes Court. 1852. Origin possibly for the Prince Regent. Off Windsor Street. Probably demolished in 1950s.

Princes Drive. 1887 and 1923. The length to the east from Victoria Park to Old Warwick Road was built about 1887 to provide access to the river and the sewage works; it was named Sewage Lane and then River Walk Lane until incorporated into Princes Drive. 37 addresses. Origin the Prince of Wales who opened the street and bridge over the river in 1923; he became King Edward VIII. Warwick New Road to Old Warwick Road.

Princes Street. 1863. 59 addresses. Early references to the name Princess Street have been found. Origin unknown, possibly alluding to the Prince Regent. Off Campion Terrace.

Printer Street. 1820. Renamed West Street before 1927. About 6 houses. Named for a printer, Fairfax, probably the first printer in town; he was founder of the Leamington Courier newspaper. Off Clemens Street, west side. Buildings demolished before 1990.

Priory Court. 1840. 4 or 5 houses. Origin uncertain, see Priory Terrace. Cottages off Priory Street.

Priory Street. Before 1828. 8 addresses. Origin uncertain, see Priory Terrace. Off Tachbrook Road.

Priory Terrace. 1820. 22 addresses. There is no evidence of a priory in the vicinity although a building between this street and the river was named The Priory in 1852 and Priory Farm was recorded before that. The name probably derives from historical links with Kenilworth Priory (Abbey). Off Bath Street, opposite to Victoria Terrace.
Nos 4 and 6 and the former Post Office building are Listed Grade II.

Promenade. 1832. Became Dormer Place before 1888. Simply a place for promenading. Early name for Dormer Place or the footpath alongside on the edge of the Pump Room Gardens, also known as Linden Walk.

Prospect Road. 1929. 60 addresses. Origin possibly because the view from the upper end of the street offered a prospect of the countryside beyond the railway. Extension of Grosvenor Road to the east.

Purcell Close. DATE. 8 addresses. Origin unknown. South side of Eastfield Road.

Purton Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 6 addresses. Possibly named for a village in Gloucestershire. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

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Quarry Street. Started about 1894 and housing developed over a long period. 70 addresses. On the site of a quarry for clay for bricks. Off Rugby Road.

Queen Street. 1837, the houses were replaced with the Kennedy Square development. 22 addresses at this time; about 98 before redevelopment. One of a number of streets in the area with names related to Royalty. Off Campion Terrace.

 

Queensway. Started in 1949; the earliest proposal for a street from Princes Drive to St Helens Road was in 1930; although it ws begun as part of the Shrubland estate it did not open as a through road to the north until about 1990. 243 addresses. The name relates to the royal family. From Europa Way to Tachbrook Road.

R

Radbrook Way. About 1968 to 1970. 3 addresses. Named for the brook which forms the boundary between Radford Semele and both Leamington and Whitnash; the brook is now sometimes referred to as Whitnash Brook although that was the name of a stream which ran much further to the west and is now culverted. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Radcliffe Gardens. 1957. 66 addresses. Origin uncertain; an unlikely candidate is Robert Beehoe Radcliffe 1797 to 1832 who was an England cricketer who died in Leamington. Blocks of flats on Brunswick Street.

Radford Cottages. Before 1886; uncertain when named. 4 houses. Named for Radford Semele. Off Leam Terrace East.

Radford Road. Before 1783. 273 addresses. This was part of the road from Warwick to Daventry which later became a turnpike. Named for Radford Semele. The street runs from an end-on connection to High Street to the town boundary to the east. The transition from High Street to Radford Road has changed. On early maps High Street ran at least as far as Willes Road. In recent years Radford Road began at Forfield Place but it currently (2019) begins at George Street. The date of the latest renaming was before 1950.

Radford Street. Recorded in 1839. Named for Radford Semele. Probably refers to some houses in Leam Terrace East.

Radley Mews. 2019. Houses being built near Lillington Free Church. Origin unknown. Off Cubbington Road.

Railway Terrace. Before 1862. About 5 houses. Origin unknown; quite strange because there is no railway nearby. Off Leam Terrace East. Unlikely but possibly an early name for Glebe Place.

Ramsey Road. 1964. 11 business addresses. Possibly named for the place in the Isle of Man. Off St Mary’s Road, Sydenham.

Randolph Close. 1969. 16 addresses. Named for the local family of boxers; Randolph Turpin was the most successful. Off Endsleigh Gardens, Gainsborough Drive.

Ranelagh Street. Before 1811. 2 addresses currently; about 10 addresses at an earlier date. Named for Ranelagh Gardens, pleasure garden and plant nursery, nearby. Ranelagh Gardens struggled when Jephson Gardens opened in 1846 and they were sold about 1849 when the proprietor, John Cullis, died. Off Brunswick Street.

Ranelagh Terrace. A short length of this street off Brunswick Street was built about 1808; the remainder of the length to Tachbrook Road was known as The Ropewalk, where ropes may have been made, for a time; the remainder of the street was probably not built until about 1896. 140 addresses. Named for Ranelagh Gardens, pleasure garden and plant nursery, nearby (see Ranelagh Street). Off Brunswick Street.

Range Meadow Close. About 1980. 29 addresses. Named for a firing range which was near this site and is shown on a map dated 1881. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue

Ravensdale Avenue. 1964. 22 addresses. Place in the Lake District. Off Penrith Close.

Rawlinson Road. 1940. Site of prefabricated homes initially. 41 addresses. Named for a long-serving town clerk, Leo Rawlinson. Off Gresham Avenue.

Reardon House. Perhaps 1970s. 6 addresses. Possibly named for Ray Reardon, snooker champion. Off Tachbrook Street

Redberry Court. Perhaps 1960s. About 10 addresses. Origin unknown. Nos 27 to 35 Charlotte Street.

Redcar Close. Before 1972. 19 addresses. Named for horse racecourse to recognise the use of land of Stud Farm. Off Valley Road.

Redhill Furrows. About 1998 to 2002. 13 addresses. Reference to an old field name and the appearance of the ploughed land. Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Redland Road. 1953. 48 addresses. Probably reference to the clay in the area. Off Henley Road.

Regent Court. Name given to the retail area in Livery Street in 2005. 103 addresses in Livery Street. Named for the Prince Regent, later King George IV. Off the Parade. Regent Hotel is alongside the street and is Listed Grade II.

Regent Grove. Part of Lillington Lane before 1783; named about 1815. 59 addresses. Named for the Prince Regent, later King George IV. Off the Parade.
Denby Buildings and No 31 are Listed Grade II. Note that the numbering is confusing because Denby Buildings are numbered 1 to 37 but numbers from 31 Regent Grove begin again to the east.

Regent Mews. 1832. Named for the Prince Regent, later King George IV. This was the mews of stables and carriage sheds for Regent Hotel. Before the hotel was built it was named King’s Mews. Now known as a pedestrian way with two names, Livery Street and Regent Court, from the Parade to Regent Street.

Regent Place. Before 1825. 53 addresses. Named for the Prince Regent, later King George IV. Off Bath Street.

Regent Square House. 1972. Named for the Prince Regent, later King George IV. The block of shops and offices on the south-east corner of the crossing of the Parade and Regent Street. On the site of gardens of the Regent Hotel; for many years it was also occupied by a small building that had many uses.

Regent Street. Began about 1808. Initially named as Cross Street and renamed in 1819 after a visit of the Prince Regent; lengths to the west were variously named Wellington Street and Church Hill; the name had earlier been given to what became Aylesford Street. 249 addresses. Named for the Prince Regent, later King George IV. Crosses the Parade.
Many properties are Listed Grade II:-
Odds, Nos 7, 9, 25 to 33, Fizzy Moon (No 35), 39 to 61, 63 to 79, 83 to 99, The Royal Pug (No 141) and the Angel Hotel (No 143).
Evens, Nos 8, 12, 18, 20, 22 to 30, 48 to 52, 58, 60, 72, 74, 82, 84, 86 to 90 and 118.

Rene England House. Before 2005. 29 addresses. Edna Irene (Rene) England OBE was Mayor in 1968. Goodfellow Street.

Renshaw Drive. 2019. UNKNOWN addresses. William Charles Renshaw, born in 1861 in central Leamington, won 12 Wimbledon tennis championships; five were doubles partnered with his twin brother Ernest. “Drive” would be the appropriate word to name any street associated with his/their name and the sport of tennis that they played. Off Station Approach.

Richards Grove. 1996. Built on part of the site of a plant nursery of Frank Bradshaw at No 35 St Helens Road. 20 addresses. SNN Named after a former headmaster of Leam College 1936-1950. Off Windmill Road. The area was known as Fern Nursery around 1885.

Richmond Court. About 1960, DATE. 15 addresses. Origin unknown. St Mary’s Road.

Ridgewood Close. 1971. 15 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Riversleigh Road.

Rinill Grove. About 1970 to 1975. 15 addresses. Origin is probably related to an existing area mentioned in the Enclosure Act 1768. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Riplingham. The original house with this name was on the site before 1901; it was probably the largest single house in the town; replaced by flats in DATE. 42 addresses. Possibly named for place in the East Riding of Yorkshire. The original house was initially named Bolarum. The site is now (2019) a block of flats in Arlington Avenue

Risdale Close. 1964. 14 addresses. Named for a place in the Lake District. Off Borrowdale Drive.

River Close. Date 1950 to 1963. 10 addresses. Name derived from the location near river. Off Edmondscote Road.

River Walk. See New River Walk

River Walk Lane. Known as Sewage Lane before 1883. As well as leading to the sewage works it also led to the walk alongside the river. The street from the river walk alongside Victoria Park to Old Warwick Road is now named as the southern part of Princes Drive.

Riverside. Land reclaimed about 1840 when the river was straightened. This street was not named before about 1990; the address used before this related to buildings on the site from time to time including Drill Hall, Fire Station and Mortuary. 6 addresses. Clearly named for its location by river. Portland Row was part of the site, now demolished. Off Adelaide Road.

Riversleigh Road. 1970. 43 addresses. Probably named for its location near the River Avon. Off Old Milverton Road.

Robbins Way. DATE. 9 addresses. Named for Mayor George James Walter Robbins, 1969 to 1970. Off Haddon Road.

Robinia Close. About 1993. 20 addresses. Origin unknown, probably named for a plant. Off Rosewood Crescent, Gresham Avenue.

Rochester Terrace. Before 1909. Absorbed into Highfield Terrace about 1939. Probably named for the town in Kent. Part of Highfield Terrace, off Rugby Road.

Rochford Court. 1964. Origin unknown. A row of 4 houses next to No 28 Avenue Road; they were built on the gardens of houses in Adelaide Road.

Rock Mill Lane. Before 1790. 26 addresses. The mill was built on or near a rocky outcrop beside the River Avon. Off Rugby Road.
4 buildings, Rock Mill, Rock Mill House, Rock Cottage and White House, are Listed Grade II.

Ropewalk. 1808. Presumably it was used as a place for making ropes. The western part of Ranelagh Terrace when the eastern part was built; see that street for details.

Rosefield Place. About 1832. No addresses. Probably just a pleasant-sounding name. Rear of Euston Place provides access to Justice Centre and car park.

Rosefield Street. 1830. 48 addresses. Probably just a pleasant-sounding name. West and east off Newbold Street. The existing houses are all east of Newbold Street. There were 9 houses in the street named Newbold Cottages near Newbold Place next to The Drawing Board which have been demolished DATE.
There is a Blue Plaque for Robert Simpson, watercolour artist, is at No

Rosefield Terrace. About 1840; renamed Street in 1903. Probably just a pleasant-sounding name. Early name for what is now the western part of Rosefield Street.

Rosewood Crescent. 1993. 36 addresses. Probably just a pleasant-sounding name. Off Whitethorn Drive off Gresham Avenue.

Rotherfield Close. 2010. 5 addresses. Possibly named for a village in Oxfordshire or Surrey. Off Farley Street.

Royal Priors. 1985. 42 addresses. Reference to the title of the town and the earlier name of Leamington Priors. Shopping centre off Regent Street and Warwick Street.

Rugby Road. Before 1700. 324 addresses. Leads to Rugby. A part of the road which for a time was the turnpike from Warwick to Rugby.
St Marks Church and Milverton School are in this street. The first railway station in the town was also at the corner with Old Milverton Road from 1844; this was moved to Warwick New Road in 1883.
St Mark’s church is Listed Grade II*.
Nos 111, 113, 157 (Coventry Arms, Fat Pug), 159 and 161 are Listed Grade II.

Rushmore Estate. 1927. Named for Rushmore Farm; origin of the name unknown. The estate was built on part of Rushmore Farm.

Rushmore Farm. Before 1854. Origin unknown. The site of the farmhouse was at location of Jenton Road on Sydenham industrial estate.

Rushmore Place. 1878. About 14 houses in 1881. Named for Rushmore Farm; origin of name unknown. Off Rushmore Street. Demolished DATE.

Rushmore Street. 1871. 52 addresses. Named for Rushmore Farm; origin of name unknown. Off Clapham Terrace.

Rushmore Terrace. 1878. 7 addresses. Named for Rushmore Farm; origin of name unknown. Off Rushmore Street, alongside the canal; an unusual three storeyed terrace.

Rusina Court. 2003. 49 addresses. Named for Rusina Villa which was on the site with access from Tachbrook Road; the grounds of the villa earlier became a plant nursery after demolition; the origin of the word Rusina is unknown; it is a name for a genus of moths. Off Ranelagh Terrace.

Russell Court. 1959. Possibly named for Lord Russell, prime minister 1865. Off Russell Street.

Russell Place. 1835. Possibly named for Lord Russell, who later became prime minister 1865. Off Russell Terrace.

Russell Street. 1818. 17 addresses. Possibly named for Lord Russell, who later became prime minister 1865. From Warwick Street to Clarendon Avenue. Abbey House at No 22 is Listed Grade II.

Russell Terrace. 1825. 214 addresses. Possibly named for Lord Russell, who later became prime minister 1865; there is also evidence of a Russell Farm in this area of the town. From end-on meeting with Chapel Street to Willes Road.
These houses are Listed Grade II. Odds, Nos 15 to 21, 35, 37, 51 and 55. Evens, Nos 6 to 14 and 16.
A Blue Plaque for John Ruskin, polymath of the nineteenth century, is at No 8.

Ryland Close. 1974. 60 addresses. Probably named for Councillor Smith-Ryland of Sherbourne. Off Endsleigh Gardens. 

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Salisbury Hall. About 1904. 12 addresses. Originally built by the Conservative Party, it was named for the Marquess of Salisbury who served as leader of the party from 1880 and as Prime Minister for 13 years. Warwick Street and Windsor Street. This building is in two major parts; at the northern end were club rooms and further south there was a meeting hall accessed from a Palladian doorway in terracotta. The whole building was converted to apartments named Windsor Club about 2012.
The part on Warwick Street is No 36 and is Listed Grade II.

Sanders Court. Before 1838. Probably named for the owner of the court. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Sandersons Court. Before 1887. Probably named for the owner of the court. Between Park Street and Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Sandown Close. 1980s, DATE. 22 addresses. Named for a racecourse because it is on the fields of Stud Farm. The style of the house illustrated is a “French house”. Off Valley Road.

Sandy Lane. Before 1783. Probably named for an area of sandy soil. Off Lillington Road. Most of this street is in Old Milverton but the site of North Leamington School was transferred to Leamington by Order in 2015. This was part of a main road to Kenilworth before the current Kenilworth Road was made.

Sapphire Drive. 1996. 28 addresses. Street imaginatively named for its location on the site of the Henry Griffith jewel factory. Off Queensway.

Sargeaunt Street. 1931. 32 addresses. Miss Sargeaunt was a long-serving councillor (1919 to 1938). Off Bury Road.

Satchwell Court. 01. 1834. Demolished about 1930. Named for Benjamin Satchwell, the “Village Rhymer” or “senior native resident” in 1808. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Satchwell Court. 02. Conflicting dates; certainly before 1837 but probably not as early as 1808. Named for Benjamin Satchwell; no evidence found that he owned or was connected to it. Off Clemens Street.

Satchwell Court. 03. 1985. Named in memory of the original Satchwell Court built in 1834. Name given to the area between Royal Priors southern entrance and Regent Street when the shopping centre was built.

Satchwell Place. 01. 1807. A block of four houses. Benjamin Satchwell had a cottage on or near the site which was also the Post Office; the houses were built by his daughter Mrs Hopton. Named for Benjamin Satchwell, the Village Rhymer. Off New Street.
The block of four houses is Listed Grade II.

Satchwell Place. 02. After 1991. This is now the name given to the footpath which runs along the edge of the gardens of the four houses named Satchwell Place. This path was earlier named Gordon Passage because it led towards Gordon House. Named for Benjamin Satchwell, the Village Rhymer. Off New Street.
Gordon House is Listed Grade II.

Satchwell Street. Before 1813. About 40 addresses. Named for Benjamin Satchwell, the Village Rhymer. Between Warwick Street and Regent Street. It was demolished and the Royal Priors shopping centre was built on the site in 1985.

Satchwell Walk. 1985. 11 addresses. Named for Benjamin Satchwell, the Village Rhymer. From Park Street to Satchwell Court (Royal Priors).

Saunders House. Before 2016. 6 addresses. Probably named for Thomas Henry Saunders, Mayor 1959 to 1960. This block of flats replaced No 67 Binswood Avenue.

Saxon Meadows. DATE. 15 addresses. Appears to be a fanciful use of the name of ancient people; there is no evidence of Saxons in the area. Off St James Meadow Road and Old Milverton Road.

Sayer Close. Name agreed in 2016, built in 2019. 25 Addresses. Named for Malcolm Sayer, designer of the Jaguar E-type car (1961); he lived in Portland Place West. Off Station Approach.

Sayer Court. About 2016. 25 addresses. Named for Malcolm Sayer, designer of the Jaguar E-type car (1961); he lived in Portland Place West. Block of flats on Tachbrook Road.

Scarborough Cottages. 1886. About 2 addresses. Demolished about 1960; the adjoining Radford Cottages remain. Origin unknown. Behind No 201 Leam Terrace East.

Scotland Place. 1853. About 40 houses. Mostly demolished and Charles Gardner Road built on much of the site in 1964; some original houses remain at the Tachbrook Road end. Origin unknown, most likely the country. Off St Johns Road to Tachbrook Road.

Scott Road. 1927. 23 addresses. Unknown origin, perhaps for author Sir Walter Scott. Off Waverley Road, Rushmore estate.

Severn Close. DATE. 13 addresses. Named for the river. Off Valley Road.

Sewage Lane. 1887. Early name for that part of Princes Drive from Old Warwick Road to the sewage works; it also led to the River Walk. Named for the sewage works at the northern end. It was soon renamed River Walk Lane and then it became Princes Drive in 1923.

Sheepcote Close. 1973. 12 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Villiers Street.

Shellays Cottages. Before 1852. 2 Cottages behind No 8 New Street. Demolished in 1958. Origin probably the name of the owner.

Sherbourne Place. Before 1844. 19 addresses. Probably named for the village near Warwick. Along Clarendon Street.

Sherbourne Terrace. About 1844. 13 addresses. Probably named for the village near Warwick. Along Clarendon Street.

Sherwood Walk. 1963. 20 addresses. Probably named for Sherwood Forest. Off Parklands Avenue.

Shires, The. 1989. Origin uncertain. In 2018 the name appears to have changed recently (2018) to Leamington Shopping Centre. It is mostly (if not all) in the Borough of Warwick. Off Tachbrook Park Drive.

Shrubland Street. Built about 1835 and named Springfield Street. 61 addresses. Renamed in 1875 for Shrubland Hall, the home of the Wise family off Tachbrook Road; the true origin of the word Shrubland probably relates to the shrubby nature of vegetation. Off Brunswick Street . Shrubland Street School is in the street.

Shrubland Terrace. Before 1852. 3 houses. Named for Shrubland Hall, the home of the Wise family off Tachbrook Road; true origin of Shrubland probably relates to shrubby nature of vegetation. Nos 25 to 29 (odds) Tachbrook Road.

Shuckburgh Grove. 1980. 67 addresses. Named for Shuckburgh Hall or the village of Lower Shuckburgh, both near Southam. Off Loxley Way.

Silver Birch Grove. 1996. 10 addresses. Named for trees; the street is at the location of the Arboretum of John Hitchman’s Hydropathic Establishment which became the Royal Midland Counties Home in St Helens Road. Off Wych Elm Grove.

Sir Frank Whittle Gardens. See Frank Whittle Gardens (Sir).

Sir Frank Whittle Mews. See Frank Whittle Mews (Sir).

Smith Street. 1790. No addresses in 2019. Named for the daughter or son-in-law of William Abbotts who founded the first commercial spa bath adjoining this street. Off Bath Street. The side of the Bath Hotel was along the north side of the street.

Smith’s Buildings. Before 1830; shown on map of 1852. Probably named for the owner of the buildings. At the corner of St Johns Road and Shrubland Street. These buildings were on the site which is now occupied by Charles Gardner Road.

Soans Drive. 2018. 57 addresses. Named for local garage on the site which closed in DATE. New housing built on site of business premises. Off St Marys Road.

Solway Close. About 1970 to 1975. 24 addresses. A Firth in Scotland. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Somers Place. 1846. 7 addresses. Probably named for Earl Somers; the name Somers is related to the name Eastnor which was also used for street names in the town. Off Regent Street.

Somerset House. Before 1843. Built as Jarman’s Brunswick Hotel which survived until about 1925 when renamed. 2 addresses. Named for the county or the Duke of Somerset. On the corner of Clarendon Place and Warwick Street. A drawing on a map shows the hotel with another wing to the west on Warwick Street to make the façade symmetrical but which does not appear to have been built.

Somerset Place. Before 1852. Named for the county or the Duke of Somerset. Off Clemens Street Demolished DATE.

South Bank. DATE. Probably had a southerly aspect. An area in Cubbington Road, Lillington.

South Crescent. One reference has been found to a location in Leam Terrace in 1827.

South Parade. 01. 1829. Origin appears a bit contrary because it is in the northern part of the town. This street was renamed Clarendon Avenue about 1875.

South Parade. 02. 1828. About 8 houses. The houses probably had attractive southern aspect when built; an advertisement in 1829 refers to a house ‘commanding picturesque views of the wooded village of Whitnash and surrounding country’. A run of houses on the north side of Charlotte Street at the western end. The name was abandoned about 1835 because of confusion with the street of the same name which later became Clarendon Avenue.

South View Road. Before 1914. 31 addresses. A description of the location of the street. Off Cubbington Road.

Southbank House. About 1870; converted to flats in 2002. 34 addresses. Named for a description of location, although it is actually on the north bank of the river. A house on Warwick New Road; now part of Lucas Court.

Southborough Terrace. 1963. 30 addresses. Probably because it is in the south of the town. Row of shops in Brunswick Street with living above.

Southlands. DATE. 5 addresses. Origin probably related to the location in the south of the town. This was a house at No 85 Radford Road. It became a school from 1933 until after 1954 DATE. It was demolished about DATE and a block of five flats was built with the same name.

Southlea Avenue. 1938. 29 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Kingsway, Shrubland estate.

Southlea Close. 1938. 12 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Southlea Avenue, Shrubland estate.

Southorn Court. 1961. 46 addresses. Named for C Herbert Southorn, Mayor three times from 1935. Off The Crest.

Southorn Place. DATE. Origin unknown. Mentioned in 1845 in Oxford Row. Precise location unknown.

Southsea Place. DATE. Origin unknown; possibly named for a place in Hampshire or Clwyd. Mentioned near Printer Street in 1887.

Southway. Name agreed 1935 but not built until 1952. 72 addresses. Named for the location. Off Grosvenor Road.

Spencer Street. 1835. This street may initially have been named Harriet Street but changed to Spencer Street soon after. 52 addresses. Harriet was the name of the wife of Matthew Wise. Named for Lord Spencer. Off Bath Street. In 2019 it is the section of street from Bath Street to Lower Avenue but maps of 1900 show Spencer Street reaching as far as Station Approach. The section from Lower Avenue to Station Approach is now named as part of Avenue Road.
The following buildings are Listed Grade II – Nos 1-3 (odds), 5 to 13 (odds), United Reform Church, The Avenue pub, No 12 and the Bath Assembly Rooms.

Spencer Yard. 1875. Originally mews road to Victoria Terrace and Spencer Street. 10 addresses. Named for Lord Spencer. Off Spencer Street. The remains of a diagonal row of buildings has not yet been explained; they may follow the line of an early or drive leading directly to the manor house.

Spilsbury Close. DATE. 15 addresses. Named for Sir Bernard Spilsbury, the pioneer forensic scientist, born in Bath Street. Off College Road.

Springfield Street. 1835. The original name for Shrubland Street; renamed in 1875. Origin unknown; Springfield is the name of several places in England. East and west off Brunswick Street.

Springwell Road. About 1968 to 1970. 14 addresses. Possibly relates to the waters of the spa town. Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Spruce Grove. 1996. 9 addresses. Named for the tree; the street is in the location of the arboretum of John Hitchman’s Hydropathic Establishment which became the Royal Midland Counties Home in St Helens Road. Off Silver Birch Grove.

Square Street. 1839. No addresses today. Perhaps named for a market square. Off Clarendon Avenue. A street that led to Covent Garden Market.

St Alban’s Close. DATE. 7 addresses. Probably in memory of St Albans Church in Warwick Street which was demolished about 1960. Off Old Milverton Road.

St Alban’s House. 1968. The building on the site of St Albans Church which was demolished about 1960. Warwick Street.

St Andrew’s Road. 1954. 53 addresses. Named for Scottish saint in memory of the landowner Eddie McGregor. Off Montrose Avenue, Lillington.

St Ann’s Close. About 1964 to 1968. 12 addresses. Place in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

St Bride’s Close. About 1964 to 1968. 22 addresses. Place in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

St David’s Close. About 1964 to 1968. 13 addresses. Place in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

St Fremund Way. 1998. 70 addresses. Relates to St Fremund, a ninth century saint who, according to legend, made his way along Rad Brook to the Holy Well after being injured in battle at Radford Semele. Off Chesterton Drive.

St George’s Road. 1854. 50 addresses. Probably named for the patron saint of England. Off Tachbrook Road.

St Govan’s Close. 1965. 12 addresses. Place in Pembrokeshire. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

St Helen’s Road. 1864. 52 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Tachbrook Road. Originally continued east of Brunswick Street but this part was renamed Grosvenor Road in about 1953.

St James’ Meadow Road. DATE. 30 addresses. Named for the parish church in Old Milverton. Off Old Milverton Road.

St John’s Road. 1852. 8 addresses. Demolished in 1967 and soon rebuilt. Named for the church in Tachbrook Street. Off Shrubland Street.

St John’s Terrace. After 1834. 8 addresses. Named for the nearby church. A terrace in Tachbrook Street.

St Luke’s Cottages. Demolished 1955 in Augusta Place.

St Margaret’s Road. 1952. 57 addresses. Named for the parish church of Whitnash. Off Brunswick Street.

St Mark’s Mews. 01. 1895. Proposed name for the mews road which is now Cliffe Road. Named for St Marks Church. Off Rugby Road.

St Mark’s Mews. 02. DATE after 1973. 10 addresses. Named for St Marks Church. Off St Marks Road.

St Mark’s Road. 1879. 33 addresses. Named for St Marks Church. Off Rugby Road.
St Marks church is Listed Grade II* and the lychgate and Old Vicarage are Listed Grade II,

St Mary’s Court. DATE. Named for St Marys Church. Flats off Radford Road.

St Mary’s Crescent. 1854. 51 addresses. Named for St Marys Church. Off Chesham Street; the vehicle access from Radford Road has been closed.

St Mary’s Place. 1850 to 1891. Named for St Marys Church. A row of houses on the east side of St Marys Road.

St Mary’s Road. 1838. 200 addresses. Named for St Marys Church. Off Leam Terrace.
The following are Listed Grade II, St Mary’s Church, Nos 13, 15, 17 and 17A (Astral Lodge).

St Mary’s Terrace. 1863. 10 addresses. Named for St Marys Church. Off St Marys Road.

St Paul’s Court. 1975. Named for St Pauls Church. Willes Road.

St Paul’s Square. 1975. 41 addresses. Built when the area to the east of Lansdowne Street was redeveloped. Named for St Pauls Church. Off Queen Street and King Street.

St Peter’s Convent. About 1827. The building of the original convent is now part of St Peters School. The convent moved to Milverton Terrace when the school expanded. Named for St Peters Church. Augusta Place. It is Listed Grade II with the name Windsor Cottage.

St Peter’s Road. 1899. No addresses. Named for St Peters Church. Off Bedford Street. Originally a mews road for Dormer Place; a nearby parallel street was named Portland Road but that was used as site of a multi-storey car park.

Stamford Court. 1863. About 6 houses. Possibly named for the town in Lincolnshire. A court off Rugby Road. It became Stamford Place at the request of the residents in 1880. Demolished and replaced by Stamford Gardens about 1961. See also Barratt Place and Court and Garden Place and Court.

Stamford Gardens. 1961. 74 addresses. Possibly named for the town in Lincolnshire. Rugby Road. Block of flats built on the site of Barratt Place, Garden Place and Stamford Place.
There is a Blue Plaque for Terry Frost, abstract artist, who was born near here.

Stamford Place. 1863. About 6 houses. Possibly named for the town in Lincolnshire or a nearby pub. Originally named as Stamford Court off Rugby Road. It became Stamford Place at the request of the residents in 1880. Demolished and replaced by Stamford Gardens about 1961. See also Barratt Place and Court and Garden Place and Court. A nearby pub in Rugby Road, opened in 1833, was named the Stamford and Warrington Arms.

Standlake Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 12 addresses. Possibly named for place in Oxfordshire. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Stanford Place. Before 1885. Possibly named for Stanford Hall in Leicestershire. A terrace in Heath Terrace.

Stanley Street. 1875. Some confusion about this; probably a proposal to rename Grove Place or Grove Street which was not implemented.

Stanley’s Court. 1971. 16 addresses. Named for farmer at Sydenham Farm. Shops, Sydenham Drive.

Stanley’s Lane. Before 1800, DATE. Named for farmer at Sydenham Farm. Originally name for part of what is now named Sydenham Drive; access to Sydenham Farm.

Stanton Road. About 1970 to 1975. No addresses; access to other streets. Origin unknown. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Stark Street. One reference found to this street off Bath Place in 1842 (R).

Station Approach. 1846. 31 addresses. Named for the railway station. Off Avenue Road.

Staunton Road. 1952. 23 addresses. Probably named for the father-in-law of Matthew Wise who lived at Longbridge Manor; Staunton’s extensive collection of historical material about Warwickshire was destroyed by fire at Birmingham Free Library in 1879. Off St Margaret’s Road.

Stephenson Close. 1980 to 1990. 32 addresses. Possibly named for a borough engineer or surveyor. Off Old Milverton Road.

Stephenson Court??. 2019. XXX addresses. Possibly named for the either of the railway engineers George and Robert Stephenson. Off Station Approach.

Stidfall Grove. About 1970 to 1975. 3 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Stirling Avenue. 1955. 107 addresses. A Scottish name for the landowner, Eddie McGregor. Off Telford Avenue, Lillington. A significant length of the street is in Cubbington.

Stockton Grove. 1981. 56 addresses. Named for the village near Southam. Off Whitacre Road.

Stoneway Grove. About 1970 to 1975. 14 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Strachey Avenue. 1980s. DATE. 20 addresses. Named for Lytton Strachey, author, pupil at Leamington College. Off College Road.

Strange’s Court. Before 1852. Possibly named for the owner. Off Park Street. Demolished.

Stratford Place. One mention in 1816. Location not found

Strathearn Road. 1838. 36 addresses. Place in Perthshire, Scotland. Off Rugby Road.

Streamside. One mention in 1975. Not found

Stretton Crescent. 1953. 49 addresses. Probably named for Stretton-on-Dunsmore in Warwickshire. Off Lawford Road.

Stud Farm. 1919. Sydney McGregor bought the farm from the Wise family in 1919 and used it for rearing racehorses. The farm was south of Cubbington Road. The name is used for the housing estate which was built on the land.

Styles Close. 1970s, DATE. 70 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Davidson Avenue on the land of Warneford hospital.

Sudbury Close. 1972. 8 addresses. Named for the town in Suffolk. Off Hanworth Close, Lillington.

Suffolk Street. 1871. 26 addresses. Named for the county. Off Leicester Street.

Swadling Street. 1931. 20 addresses. Named for the Councillor who served around 1925. Off Lee Road, Shrubland estate.

Swain Crofts. About 1978 to 1982. 41 addresses. Possibly refers to Swain’s Buildings in Kenilworth Street. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Swain’s Buildings. 1839; demolished from 1903. Probably named for owner. Off Kenilworth Street. Birthplace of Private Henry Tandey, holder of the Victoria Cross; there is a Blue Plaque remembering this in Kenilworth Street.

Swan Street. 1835. 8 addresses. Probably named at the same time as The Swan Inn, a pub on the corner with Clarendon Street. Off Clarendon Street.

Sydenham Drive. 1964. 25 addresses. This street took over and extended Stanley’s Lane. Named for Sydenham farm. Off Radford Road.

Sydenham Estate. 1964. Named for nearby Sydenham Farm.

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Tachbrook Court. Possibly 1970s. About 20 addresses.Named for Bishops Tachbrook and the Tach Brook which crosses the road between that place and Leamington. Opposite Charlotte Street on Tachbrook Road.

Tachbrook Park Drive. About 1980, DATE. From the traffic island with Europa Way. Most, if not all, of this street is actually in the Borough of Warwick. Named for Bishops Tachbrook and the Tach Brook which crosses the road between that place and Leamington.

Tachbrook Road. Before 1783. 446 addresses. Named for Bishops Tachbrook and the Tach Brook which crosses the road between that place and Leamington. Off High Street/Old Warwick Road and Lower Avenue crossroads.

Tachbrook Street. 1834. 171 addresses. Named for Bishops Tachbrook and the Tach Brook which crosses the road between that place and Leamington. Off Tachbrook Road and across Brunswick Street.
St John’s Church is Listed Grade II*.

Talbot Court. 1960. 12 addresses. Origin unknown; the Talbot is an historical breed of hunting dog. A block of flats which replaced No 89 Upper Holly Walk, which was Leigh Bank College, a girls’ school at one time.

Tancred Close. About 1990, DATE. 7 addresses. Origin unknown, several candidates including a given name from Norman times meaning ‘good thinking person’. Business units off Queensway.

Tavistock Street. 1827. 28 addresses. Possibly named for the town in Devon or linked to the family of the Duke of Bedford which uses the name Tavistock. Off Warwick Street.

Taylor Avenue. 1936. 87 addresses. Possibly named for a councillor. Off Gresham Avenue, Village Farm estate.

Telford Avenue. 1934. 102 addresses. Probably named for Thomas Telford, a nationally renowned Scottish civil engineer. The road was extended to the north about 1955 CHECK. There is a distinct change in level where the extension begins. Off Cubbington Road.

Tenby Court. Before 1973. 6 addresses. Unknown origin but probably related to the town in Pembrokeshire. In Milverton Terrace.

Terrace Walk. One reference in 1812. Not located.

Terry Avenue. 1934. 14 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Old Milverton Road.

The Approach. 1947. 25 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Kingsway.

The Cedars 01. DATE. 12 addresses. Named for trees. No 61 Lillington Road.

The Cedars 02. DATE. 6 addresses. Named for trees. Warwick Place.

The Cedars Mews. DATE. 19 addresses. Named for trees. No 42 Warwick Place.

The Cloisters. DATE. Origin unclear. Lower Leam Street.

The Close. 1939. 35 addresses. Origin very clear. Off Lewellyn Road.

The Crest. 1959. 54 addresses. At top of hill; possibly Heathey Hill on the map of 1711. Off Mason Avenue, Lillington.

The Fairways. 1961. 66 addresses. Initially named Ancaster Road; soon changed at the request of residents because it is on the site of an earlier golf course. Off Beverley Road.

The Grange. 1976. 14 addresses. On the site of a house named The Grange. Upper Holly Walk.

The Greenways. 1960. 14 addresses. Named for a well-known local gentleman, Sidney Greenway. Off Cubbington Road.

The Holt. 1927. 19 addresses. Named for Alfred Holt who was mayor for three years from 1926. Off Cubbington Road. One of the first developments of council houses in the town.

The Maltings. 1984. 70 addresses. On the site of Leamington Brewery (which was established about 1839). Lillington Avenue.

The Spinney. 1968. 24 addresses. Named for the spinney which previously grew on the site. Off Rugby Road.

The Square. 1930. A single reference has been found in 1958 to improvements to The Square off Leicester Street. This probably refers to the cul-de-sac named as Leicester Street on most maps or especially the houses added later.

Thomas Street. 1838. No addresses. Named for William Thomas, the architect who designed Lansdowne Crescent and Lansdowne Circus and other buildings in the town. Off Lansdowne Street; truly a mews road to Lansdowne Crescent. On early maps (eg about 1880) it was named as part of Swan Street.

Thompson’s Buildings. Before 1882. Probably named for the owner. A court off Kenilworth Street. Demolished DATE.

Thomson Street. On a plan dated 1834 it is shown as the towpath in front of Warneford Terrace. Origin unknown. Off Althorpe Street.

Thursfield Road. 1953. 22 addresses. Dr Thomas William Thursfield was a pioneer of the Leamington Dispensary and also mayor from 1894 to 1896. Off Wellington Road.

Tower Street. About 1828. 15 addresses in 2019. Original buildings demolished and replaced about 1992. Named for a somewhat mysterious tower on one building which had an ecclesiastical appearance. Off Court Street, behind Booth’s Buildings; the street used to have vehicular access from Clemens Street.

Trinity Street. Started about 1834 as a mews road; named in 1868. 44 addresses. Probably named for Holy Trinity church nearby in Beauchamp Avenue. Off Clarendon Street.

Troutbeck Avenue. 1964. 14 addresses. Named for a place in Cumbria. Off Guys Cliffe Avenue.

Turnpike Road. Before 1783. An early name for what became High Street and Radford Road. It was part of the turnpike road from Warwick to Daventry.

Turpin Court. 1990. 8 addresses. Named for the boxer, Randolph Turpin, world middleweight champion in 1951 after beating Sugar Ray Robinson. Lee Road.

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Ullswater Avenue. 1965. 17 addresses. Named for a lake in the Lake District. Off Troutbeck Avenue.

Union Court 01. Before 1852. Origin uncertain. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Union Court 02. 2010. 17 addresses. Origin uncertain. Student block in Ranelagh Terrace.

Union Parade. 1808. An early name for lower part of the Parade. See also the Parade for more information and Listed Buildings.

Union Promenade. 1832. Origin uncertain; parallel with Union Parade at the time. An early name for Euston Place for a year or two after it was built.

Union Road. 1828. 43 addresses. Possibly named as the site of the offices of the Milverton Poor Law Union. Off Warwick Place, Milverton.

Union Row 01. Became Upper Union Parade See also the Parade for information and Listed Buildings.

Union Row 02. Brunswick Street.

Union Row 03. Milverton.

Union Street. 1808. Another name used for the lower part of the Parade; See also the Parade for information and Listed Buildings.

Union Walk. 1864. 26 addresses. Possibly named as a street leading to the Poorhouse in Court Street. Off Clemens Street and a street behind Clemens Street. Houses demolished DATE.

Upper Arlington Street. 1880. The full length of Arlington Avenue has 195 addresses. Place in East Sussex or a noble title for a person. This was the northern part of the street now named Arlington Avenue; for many years there was a gap between the two parts of the street. See also Arlington Avenue.

Upper Avenue. Before 1783. A drive to the Manor House of Matthew Wise from Old Warwick Road; the later (about 1850) footbridge from Old Warwick Road to Avenue Station followed the line of Upper Avenue. See also Lower Avenue. It was on the site of the eastern part of Station Approach.

Upper Cross Street. 1808. The first name for much of Warwick Street (renamed 1813). It simply crossed the main road, later Parade.

Upper Grove Street. 1855. 9 addresses. Possibly named for a nearby landmark grove of trees. Mews road for Clarendon Place. See also Grove Street. Off Warwick Street.

Upper Hill Street. 1837. 6 addresses. It was and is on an incline. Off Villiers Street. See also Hill Street.

Upper Holly Walk. The street used to lead to Newbold Comyn House; the Willes family was there from 1509; houses built from about 1835. 163 addresses. Known for having many holly trees. Off Willes Road. See also Holly Walk.
The following buildings on the north side are Listed Grade II, Lansdowne House, Aberdeen House, Nos 83, 83A, 85 and Oak House (previously the Liberal Club).

Upper Union Parade. Name from about 1808 for part of the Parade from Regent Street to Warwick Street. See also the Parade for more information and Listed Buildings. 

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Valley Road. 1950. 131 addresses. The western part initially followed the valley of Bins Brook but the street has been greatly extended to the east. Off Pound Lane to Parklands Avenue.

Vermont Grove. About 1970 to 1975. 8 addresses. Name of a US state but it is also a surname, most common in France. Off Danesbury Crescent, Sydenham.

Vernon Close. 1963. 30 addresses. This street was built on the site of a house which had been named Mount Vernon by its American owner; this was the name of the house of George Washington, the first president of the USA; the word Vernon sometimes relates to a glade of alder trees. Off Northumberland Road.

Vicarage Road 01. 1890. 14 addresses. Location of the Vicarage for the parish church of St Mary Magdalene. Off Cubbington Road, Lillington.
There is a Blue Plaque for Henry Eric Maudslay, Dambuster pilot, at No 1.

Vicarage Road 02. 1882. Originally the name for St Marks Road for a short time because it was the location of the vicarage. Off Rugby Road.

Vicarage Road 03. 1891. Original name for the street that was renamed Hitchman Road in 1903 because it was the location of the vicarage. Off Tachbrook Street to St Helen’s Road.

Victoria Colonnade. 1837. One address at present (2019) which is the Loft Theatre. Named for Queen Victoria. Off Bath Street, alongside the River Leam at the north end of Victoria Terrace.

Victoria Mews. 1838. Named for Queen Victoria. This was the location of some stables at the rear of Hamilton Terrace in Rosefield Terrace.

Victoria Park. Originally a cricket ground. Purchased by the council and named in 1896. Named for the jubilee of Queen Victoria. Avenue Road.

Victoria Place. 1835. The east side of the northern part of Church Street; readdressed as Church Street in 1873. Named for Queen Victoria. Church Street from Church Terrace to Priory Terrace.

Victoria Pointe. 2019. Unknown addresses. Origin unknown; this is a common name for developments in USA. Off Station Approach.

Victoria Road. 1871. 21 addresses. Named for Queen Victoria. Off Victoria Street.

Victoria Street. 1854. 24 addresses. Named for Queen Victoria. Off Archery Road, the vehicle access from Avenue Road is closed.
There is a Blue Plaque for Sir Frank Whittle, jet engine pioneer, at No 9.

Victoria Terrace. 1836. 32 addresses. Named for Queen Victoria. Bath Street. Built when the river bridge and road were widened and earlier buildings were demolished. It is numbered as part of Bath Street.

Villiers Street. Named in 1852. 95 addresses. Origin uncertain; possibly named for Sir John Villiers who was High Sherriff of Warwickshire several times around 1490 or George Villiers who was a local MP from 1792 to 1800; he was a son of the Earl of Clarendon. Off Hill Street.

Villiers Street, North. See North Villiers street.

Vincent Place. DATE

Vincent Street. 1838. 13 addresses. Origin unknown; a surname widely used in eastern and western Europe. Off Queen Street.

Viscount Close. 1947. 10 addresses. Origin unknown; Viscount is a title in the peerage. Off Kingsway, Shrubland estate.

Vivian Place. 1838. Near the Fox and Vivian pub in Clarendon Avenue; Vivian was the name of a famous horse owned by Captain Lamb around 1834 and the landlord had a successful wager on it. In the vicinity of Chandos Street.

Vodena Court. DATE. 9 addresses. Origin unknown, perhaps named for a city in Greece. Heath Terrace; to the west of the Emmanuel chapel.

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Wackrill Drive. 1984. 34 addresses. Named for Samuel Wackrill, the first mayor of the new corporation in 1875 and also in 1885 and 1886. Wackrill was a draper in Bath Street. Off Newland Road, Lillington.

Waller Street. 1890. 35 addresses. Probably named for Major General Sir George Henry Waller who became lord of the manor of Lillington from 1888; he lived at Woodcote House, Leek Wootton. Off Wathen Road

Wallsgrove Close. 1989. 9 addresses. William H Wallsgrove was mayor in 1948 and 1949. Off Valley Road, rear of the Crown Way shops.

Walnut Drive. 1989. 10 addresses. At the rear of the pub, The Walnut Tree, now repurposed as a shop. Off Crown Way.

Wards or Warde Street. Noted about 1834. It ran from White Street to Neilston Street. Origin not known. It was probably demolished when the railway was built. In the Althorpe Street area.

Warneford Mews. 1995. 33 addresses. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. A terrace on Radford Road.

Warneford Place. 1865. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. Possibly in the area of Althorpe Street, perhaps also known as Warneford Terrace 02.

Warneford Terrace 01. 1834. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. Along Southam Road, now Radford Road.

Warneford Terrace 02. Before 1881. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. Off Althorpe Street, perhaps also known as Warneford Place for some time.

Warren Close. 1963. 40 addresses. This was probably originally part of the planned route for the extension of Woodcote Road to the east (thwarted by the cricket ground). The street was partly built on the site of a house named The Warren; this was a VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment) hospital in World War I. Off Lillington Road.

Warwick Court. 1840. Named for the nearby town. A court adjacent to No 106 Warwick Street. Earlier named Iven’s Court. Earlier houses have been demolished.

Warwick Lane. 1822. Original name for what became Portland Road. Named for nearby town. Off Bedford Street.

Warwick New Road. The section from the western end of Warwick Place to Portobello Bridge existed before 1650. The section to the east of the junction with Rugby Road probably dates from about 1838. House No 38 bears the date 1880. 145 addresses. Named for nearby town. From Milverton Terrace to Portobello Bridge, junction with Rugby Road.
There is a Blue Plaque for Samuel Lockhart, elephant trainer, at No 1.
The station opened in 1883; it replaced the one in Rugby Road.
No 8 and Sunshine House (now in Copps Road) are Listed Grade II.

Warwick Place. 1834. 241 addresses. Named for nearby town. From Warwick Street to the junction with Warwick New Road. Previous to construction the route from Warwick Street to Warwick was by Guys Cliffe Road and Rugby Road (note the angle of the junction of Guys Cliffe Road and Warwick Place).
Nos 1 to 8 Bertie Terrace, Nos 34 to 40 (evens), Nos 1 to 4 The Cedars, and No 44 (Eaton Lodge) are Listed Grade II.

Warwick Road. The early name for Old Warwick Road; it was simply the road to Warwick; the Warwick to Daventry turnpike. It was Old Warwick Road on a map in 1881. Named for nearby town.

Warwick Street. 1808. 258 addresses. Initially named Upper Cross Street; renamed in 1813. Named for nearby town. From Clarendon Street to the Dell.
There is a Blue Plaque for John Cundall, architect (of the Town Hall and several other buildings in the town), at No 37 and also for Dr John Hitchman on the wall of what is No 37 Parade.
Nos 31 to 39 (odds), Nos 51, 53, 59, 75, 77, 79, 81A (Connect House), 85A (Chandos House), 105 to 111 (odds), Nos 36, 42, 62, 64, 84 to 98 (evens) and The Prince of Wales Inn are Listed Grade II.

Warwick Terrace. 1834. 46 addresses. Named for nearby town. From Warwick Street to Beauchamp Hill, alongside The Dell.
Nos 2, 3 and 4 are Listed Grade II.

Wasdale Close. 1967. 18 addresses. Named for a place in the Lake District. Off Ullswater Avenue.

Waterloo Cottages. DATE. Demolished 1960; location not known. Named for the battle site in 1815 in respect for the Duke of Wellington

Waterloo Place. 1827. 21 addresses. Named for the battle site in 1815 in respect for the Duke of Wellington. Warwick Street.
Nos 9 to 29 (the entire terrace) are Listed Grade II.

Waterloo Street. 1846. 59 addresses. Named for the battle site in 1815 in respect for the Duke of Wellington. Off Radford Road but direct vehicle access has been closed and entry is from St Mary’s Terrace.

Watersfield Gardens. About 1964 to 1968. 20 addresses. Probably named for the proximity to the canal. Beside the canal, off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Waterside Court. Clapham Terrace. CHECK. One mention found but not confirmed.

Watery Lane. Before 1783. Probably all or some of the footpath from Whitnash to Leamington which followed Whitnash Brook. The brook is now all in a culvert. A map of 1881 appears to show that this footpath began around the site of St Margaret’s Church Centre in Whitnash Road and it met Radford Road in the vicinity of Camberwell Terrace. The name is not currently used. The name Whitnash Brook is now (2019) sometimes used for Rad Brook.

Wathen Road. 1899. 92 addresses. Named for Sir Wathen Arthur Waller (1881 to 1947), Lord of the Manor of Lillington from 1914; he lived at Woodcote House, Leek Wootton. Off Lillington Road.

Watsons Buildings, Close or Court. 1852. Named for the Mr Watson who had his upholstery workshop in the street. Off Aylesford Street.

Waverley Road. 1926. 108 addresses. Perhaps named for Scottish connections. Off Tachbrook Street, Rushmore estate.

Waverton Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 10 addresses. Probably named for a place in Cumbria. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Webbs Court. 1853; last recorded in 1913, perhaps demolished or renamed. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street.

Wellington Road. 1951. 87 addresses. Probably named for the Duke of Wellington, victor at the Battle of Waterloo. Off Valley Road, Lillington.

Wellington Street. Name for part of Regent Street from 1826 to 1873; it was the section from the Parade to Somers Place (the boundary with Milverton at Bins Brook). Probably named for the Duke of Wellington; Battle of Waterloo 1815.

Wentworth Road. 1973. 14 addresses. Probably named for the golf course. Off Danesbury Crescent.

West Brook House. 1960. 33 addresses. Named for Bins Brook which ran along the west side of the block, now in a culvert. New Brook Street.

West Street. New name given to Printer Street about 1875. Possibly simply because it was on the west side of Clemens Street.

Westbourne Place. Name used from about 1833 to 1938 when the building was demolished and a petrol station was built in the site. Origin unknown although situated to the west of Old Town. The north side of High Street from Lower Avenue towards Bath Place.

Westgrove Terrace. 1891. 11 addresses. Probably named for the western part of town. End on from the west end of Conway Road; also pedestrian access from the footpath alongside the railway line.

Westlea Road. 1938. 104 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Lee Road Shrubland estate.

Weston Close. About 1970 to 1975. 8 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Stanton Road, Sydenham.

Weston Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Wharf Cottage. Before 1881. This was adjacent to a wharf on the Warwick and Napton Canal (opened in 1800). Probably demolished when the building of Sydenham estate began. Off Radford Road beside the limekilns by the canal; in the vicinity of Gulliman’s Way but on the south side of the canal.

Wheathill Close. 1958. 16 addresses. Origin unknown, rural connotations. Off Beverley Road.

Whitacre Road. 1987. 13 addresses. Probably named for the villages near Coleshill in north Warwickshire. Off Loxley Way.

White Street. Before 1838. About 12 houses. Origin unknown, perhaps named for a notable person of that name. Off Althorpe Street. The street is now named as part Althorpe Street following demolition of the original housing.

Whitehead’s Buildings. Before 1880. Probably named for the owner. A court off Kenilworth Street. Demolished DATE.

Whitehead’s Court 01. Before 1852; demolished about 1956. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Whitehead’s Court 02. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner. Off John Street. Demolished DATE.

Whitehead’s Court 03. Mentioned once in Neilston Street in 1834; not found. Probably named for the owner. Demolished DATE.

Whitehead’s Court 04. The name given to the courtyard area off Warwick Street when the Royal Priors was built in 1988; it was well known for the seating with three elephants. Probably named for the original court off Satchwell Street (Whiteheads Court 01). Demolished DATE. The elephant installation was removed and later installed by the restaurant in the Jephson Gardens.

Whitehouse Street. About 1820. ??? addresses. Origin unknown. Street from White Street to Neilston Street. Demolished.

Whitethorn Drive. About 1993. 20 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Gresham Place.

Whittaker Avenue. 1938. Name proposed for a street on the Shrubland estate but this was changed to Elizabeth Road before naming. Origin unknown.

Wickham Court. 1927. 9 addresses. Origin unknown. Off The Holt, off Cubbington Road.

Wilhelmina Close. About 2001. 34 addresses. Named for one of three well-known performing elephants owned by Samuel Lockhart around 1890; the other two animals were Trilby and Haddie. Off Warwick New Road.

Willes Road. Initially named Nash’s Road (about 1820) then Newbold Road (1837 to 1874). 201 addresses. Named for Edward Willes, landowner at Newbold Comyn. Clarendon Street to Radford Road. The crossing of the river was earlier by what was known as Mar-Dyke bridge which was a series of stones laid across the marshland and river. The present bridge was built in 1827 to a design of John Nash; the parapet was replaced later.
The following four buildings have Blue Plaques in place – at No 5, Elizabeth and Frederick Whitehead, artists; at No 6, Randolph Turpin, boxer; at No 12, William Gascoyne, builder; at No 13, William Amey, VC.
Nos 5 to 15 (odds)(previously Lansdowne Terrace), Victoria House, East Lodge, Willes Bridge. Nos 63 to 69 (odds), Trevor House, Nos 73 and 83, Sherwood, Nos 14 to 18 (evens), 28, Nos 36, 38 and 40 are Listed Grade II.

Willes Terrace. 1838. 21 addresses. Named as part of Leam Terrace East until 1873. Named for Edward Willes of Newbold Comyn. Off Leam Terrace East.

William Street. 1827. 18 addresses. Initially a mews road behind Hamilton Terrace and Brandon Parade; named about 1852. Named for William Thomas, architect. Off Wood Street.

William Thomas House. Built on the site of a commercial garage in Willes Road about 1995, DATE. 9 addresses. Named for the architect, William Thomas.

William’s Court. 1841. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished before 1985.

Willow House. Name agreed in 2003. 66 addresses. Probably named for a tree down by the nearby river. Part of Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Wilnecote Grove. About 1978 to 1982. 20 addresses. Probably named for the place near Tamworth. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Wimbourne Place. This was the new name for Dickins Yard off Kenilworth Street from 1936; it was demolished about 1960. Possibly named for the place in Dorset.

Windermere Drive. 1965. No houses, it simply leads to other streets. Named for the largest lake in the Lake District. Off Beverley Road.

Windham Terrace. 1858. Origin unknown. A terrace on the south side of High Street where part of the Copps’ Royal Hotel had been adjacent to the railway. This name is no longer used.

Windmill Road. 1932. 73 addresses. Named for the windmill which stood to the south of the street. Off Tachbrook Road.

Windsor Club. See Salisbury Hall.

Windsor Court 01. Before 1841. Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. Windsor Street. Demolished about 1957, DATE.

Windsor Court 02. Before 1843. Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. One mention found of a location in Ranelagh Street. Demolished DATE.

Windsor Place. 1847. 18 addresses. The previous name was Morris Street (1810 to 1847). Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. From Bedford Street to Windsor Street.

Windsor Street. 1821. 68 addresses. Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. From Regent Street to Warwick Street. Demolished in slum clearance from about 1957.

Winslow Close. About 1992, DATE. 5 addresses. Possibly named for the town in Buckinghamshire. Off Goodfellow Street, Milverton.

Winston Crescent. 1961. 39 addresses. Probably named for Sir Winston Churchill. Off Newland Road.

Wise Street. 1810. 14 addresses. Named for Matthew Wise, landowner, resident of the nearby Manor House in Avenue Road. Off High Street.

Wise Terrace. Before 1860. 5 addresses. Named for Matthew Wise, landowner. Off Wise Street.

Willow House. About 2002. 66 addresses. Probably named for a tree down by the nearby river. Part of Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Woburn Close. About 1986 to 1990. 12 addresses. Named for the stately home in Bedfordshire. Off Marlborough Drive, Sydenham.

Wood Street. 1859. 17 addresses. Possibly named for the vicar of St Luke’s Chapel in Holly Walk. Off Brandon Parade, Holly Walk.

Woodbine Cottages. 1860, DATE. 5 addresses. Possibly named for the plant, otherwise known as honeysuckle. Off Woodbine Street.

Woodbine Street. 1854. 26 addresses. Possibly named for the plant, otherwise known as honeysuckle. Off Church Hill.

Woodbine Terrace 01. Before 1881; demolished 1960. Possibly named for the plant, otherwise known as honeysuckle. At the end of Waterloo Street, facing the canal. One reference is to Place instead of to Terrace.

Woodbine Terrace 02. DATE. Several references to this street in Milverton from 1856 to 1879. LOCATION. Possibly an alternative name for all or part of Woodbine Street.

Woodcote Road. 1889. 39 addresses. Possibly named for Woodcote House at Leek Wootton. Off Kenilworth Road. The stub to the east of the Kenilworth Road was possibly intended to reach to Lillington Road; not built; the east end at Lillington Road is now Warren Close.

Wych Elm Drive. 1996. 29 addresses. Named for a tree for the arboretum at Dr John Hitchman’s Hydropathic Establishment. Off St Helens Road.

Wye Close. DATE. 9 addresses. Probably named for the river in South Wales. Off Valley Road.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

Y

Yew Tree Court. 1996. 29 addresses. Named for a tree at the arboretum at Dr John Hitchman’s Hydropathic Establishment. Off St Helens Road and Tachbrook Street.

York Bridge. 1893. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. This is a footbridge from the Pump Room Gardens to the River Walk and York Walk.
It is probably Listed Grade II as part of the listing of the Spa Gardens although it is not specified.

York Parade. 1893. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Possibly alternative name for York Walk (below).

York Promenade. 1893. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Earlier York Walk.

York Road. 1893. 15 addresses. On part of Perkins’ plant nursery. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Avenue Road to Adelaide Road.

York Terrace. 1828. Named for the Duke of York. Early name for the west side of the Parade from Warwick Street to Clarendon Avenue; this was not renamed as part of the Parade until 1873.
Nos 12 to 42 (evens) Parade are Listed Grade II*.

York Walk. 1893. Named for the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Footpath from York Bridge to Avenue Road (R). The continuation to the west to Princes Drive was named New River Walk and in 2019 the whole path is usually simply called the River Walk.

Yorkville Terrace. 1887. Named for the Duke of York who would become King George V. A terrace in Victoria Street.

Links to Streets beginning with —
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

Sources of Information

Over many years information has been recorded from some or all of the following sources from time to time. The database currently contains over 30,000 items of information.

Bealby-Wright, Edmund, Sketchbook Guide Royal Leamington Spa, 1990
Beck, Beck’s Leamington Guide, 1839
Bisset, James, Descriptive Guide to Leamington Priors, 1814
Black, Black’s Guide to Leamington, 1868
British Newspaper Archive, on line
Burgis, Charles Richard: A Memoir of an Old-Fashioned Grocer, James Burgis,
2008
Cameron, Jacqueline, Around RLS in Old Photographs, Jacqueline Cameron, 1991
Cameron, Jacqueline, Leamington and Warwick Disappearing Industries, Jacqueline Cameron, Amberley 2010
Cameron, Jacqueline, Royal Leamington Spa in Old Postcards, Jacqueline Cameron, European Library, 1987
Cave, Lyndon, Notes on 1800-1840, 1990, LHG Archives
Cave, Lyndon, Royal Leamington Spa, its History and Development, Phillimore, Chichester, 1980
Cave, Lyndon, Royal Leamington Spa, A History, Phillimore, Chichester, 2000
Chaplin, R, New Light on the Origins of Royal Leamington Spa, reprinted Oxford, 1974
Clarke, H G, Royal Leamington Spa, A Century of Growth and Development, HG Clarke, 1947, reprint by WCC Museum, 1988
Cooper, W, History of Lillington, W Cooper, 1940, King’s Stone Press Kineton
Croom, Jane N, “An Eligible Spot for Building”: the Suburban Development of Greatheed Land in New Milverton, 1824-1900, Warwickshire History, Vol. XV no. 5, Summer 2013, pp. 217-234
Donnelly, Peter (editor), Mrs Milburn’s Diaries: An Englishwoman’s day-to-day reflections 1939-45, Fontana/Collins, 1979
Drew, John H, The Book of Royal Leamington Spa, Barracuda, 1978
Dudley, Thomas, Complete History, 1901
Fenner, Dorothy, Noises On and Off – 75 Years of the Loft Theatre, Loft Theatre
Field, Jean, Rangemaster, Jean Field, Brewin, 2006
Field, New Guide, 1816
Gibbons, Bill, Royal Leamington Spa, Images from the Past, 1995
Gibbons, W G, Royal Leamington Spa Images from the Past, Jones-Sands Publishing, 1985
Gibbons, W G, Royal Leamington Spa Part 1, Social Life, 1985, Jones-Sands
Gibbons, W G, Royal Leamington Spa Part 2, Town Growth, 1985, Jones-Sands
Gibbons, W G, Royal Leamington Spa Part 3, Signs of the Past, 1985, Jones-Sands
Gibbons, W G, Royal Leamington Spa Part 4, On the Move, 1985, Jones-Sands
Gibbons, W G, Royal Leamington Spa Part 5, On the Rails, 1985, Jones-Sands
Gibbons, W G, Royal Leamington Spa Part 6, The Letter and the Law, 1985, Jones-Sands
Gorman, W V, A Perfect Fit, 1999, APF
Granville, A B, Spas of England volume 2, 1841
Griffin, Alan, Leamington Lives Remembered, Feldon Books, 2012
Hembry, P M, The English Spa 1560-1815, 1990
Hopper, Richard, The History of Leamington Priors: From the Earliest, 1842
Hunimex, Streets mentioned in 1841, Piece Number 1135, Knightlow Hundred, 1841
Jeffs, Michael, editor, Royal Leamington Spa, A History in 100 Buildings, Leamington History Group, 2018.
Jennings, Allan, The Bombing of Royal Leamington Spa, Sydni Books, Leamington Spa, 2015
Jennings, Allan, Ellis, Martin and Lewin, Thomas, Pubs of Royal Leamington Spa, Brewin, 2014
Kelly, various Kelly’s Directories to 1978
Leamington History Group Community Archive
Leamington History Group website, www.leamingtonhistory.co.uk
Leamington History Group, History @ Bath Place, Leamington History Group, Warwick, 2008
Leamington History Group, A History Trail in Leamington Cemetery, LHG, 2014
Leamington History Group, People & Places, LHG 2010
Leamington Literary Society, More Looking Back, 1980
Leamington Literary Society, The Leamington We Used to Know, Leamington Literary Society, 1977
Leamington Literary Society, Looking Back
Leamington Literary Society, A Last Look Back
Leamington Society, Leamington Society Newsletters
Leamington Society, Random Papers – Leamington Society, 1985
Leamington Spa Courier newspaper, 1828 to present
Leon Edel, The Diary of Alice James, Penguin Classics, 1982
Lillington Local History Society Archive
Long, Jenny, and Barber, Andrew, Graciously Pleased, Ed Jenny Long & Andrew Barber, Mayneset, 1988
Loudon, Charles, Waters of Leamington Spa, 1828
Manning, J C, Glimpses of our Local Past – 1800-1894, reprint 1991
McArthur, Glenn, and Szamosi, Annie, William Thomas, Architect, Canada Art, Toronto,1996
Medley, Sarah, Visitor’s Descriptive Guide, 1826
Merridew, John, Memorandum of Leamington Priors, 1822
Moncrieff, William Thomas, Visitor’s New Guide, 1818
Morley and Haslehurst, Warwick and Leamington, 1940
National Archive Online Census Returns, 1841-1911
Nicholls, E, editor, “When they were young, – growing up in bygone Warwickshire”, Warwickshire County Library
Noszlopy, George, Public Sculpture, Coventry & Warwickshire, Liverpool University Press, 2000
Nunn, J W, Royal Leamington Spa Official Guide, Borough Council, 1958
OpenStreetMap.org website
O’Shaughnessy, Frances, A Spa and its Children, Warwick, 1979
Our Warwickshire website
Parish Church Registers, accessed online via Ancestry
Pevsner, Nikolaus, Warwickshire, Penguin, 1966
Pickford, Chris and Pevsner, Nikolaus, Warwickshire, Yale University Press,2016
Pigot, Pigot’s Directory 1838 and 1848
Post Office, Post Code Book, 1973 etc
Reading, Shirley, No Bricks Without Mortar: 50 Years of AC Lloyd 1948 to 1998,1998
Reeve, New Guide to Royal Leamington Spa, 1839
Rushton, Margaret, St Mary Magdalene, Lillington, A Churchyard Walk, 2015
Sharp, T P L, Short History of Leamington Post Office, Leamington Spa and Warwick Philatelic Society
Sharpe, Pocket Guide to Leamington, 1818
Smith, Francis, An Historical and Descriptive Guide, 1827
Spennell’s Directories
Stephenson, Craig D “The Warneford, A Hospital’s Story”, the Social History Centre at the University of Warwick, published by South Warwickshire General hospitals NHS Trust
Sutherland, Graham, Frith Photographs of Leamington Spa, Francis Frith, 2000
Sydenham History Group, Celebration of Sydenham, 2014
Taulbut, Richard, New Light on Lillington Church, Lillington PCC, 2017
Warwick District Council, Conservation Area Reports Parts 1, 2 and 3, c 2006
Warwick District Council, Loose-leaf Folder, Streets of Leamington and Whitnash, about 1995
Warwick District Council, Leamington Spa Art Gallery and Museum
Warwickshire County Council, Central Divisional Library, Village into Town, Royal Leamington Spa, 1977
Warwickshire County Record Office Documents and Photographs, as acknowledged in text
Warwickshire Current and Historical Maps, access on Warwickshire Libraries website
Warwickshire Museum Service, Warwick Museum Geology leaflet, undated, about 2000
Winterburn, John M, History of Lillington, self-published, 1990
Wisdom, T H, 50 Years of Progress, 1920 to 1970 – AP Jubilee, AP, 1970
Unknown, Leamington Spa & Warwick Pictorial, 1899-1900
Unknown, Alice James in Leamington Spa: Those Unspeakable Years, typescript in Leamington Library, 2005

Thanks

Thanks also to those who have provided valuable information and comment including Stan Brown, Phil Parker, Margaret Rushton, Alan Griffin, Mike Patrick, Allan Jennings, Barry Franklin and Michael Pearson. Apologies to anyone we have accidentally omitted.