NOTE that we have not found any streets in the town beginning with X or Z.

The Streets of Leamington beginning with W

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Wackrill Drive. 1984. 34 addresses. Named for Samuel Wackrill, the first mayor of the new corporation in 1875 and also in 1885 and 1886. Wackrill was a draper in Bath Street. Off Newland Road, Lillington.

Waller Street. 1890. 35 addresses. Named for Major General Sir George Henry Waller who became lord of the manor of Lillington from 1888; he lived at Woodcote House, Leek Wootton. Off Wathen Road

Wallsgrove Close. 1989. 9 addresses. William H Wallsgrove was mayor in 1948 and 1949. Off Valley Road, rear of the Crown Way shops.

Walnut Drive. 1989. 10 addresses. At the rear of the pub, The Walnut Tree, now repurposed as a shop. Off Crown Way.

Wards Street. Noted about 1834. Probably demolished for the building of the railways or not built. Origin not known. Shown on a map as off Neilston Street in the Althorpe Street area.

Warneford Mews. 1995. 33 addresses. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. A terrace on Radford Road.

Warneford Place. 1865. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. Possibly in the area of Althorpe Street, perhaps also known as Warneford Terrace 02.

Warneford Terrace 01. 1834. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. Along Southam Road, now Radford Road.

Warneford Terrace 02. Before 1881. Named for Samuel Wilson Warneford who helped found Warneford Hospital. Off Althorpe Street, perhaps also known as Warneford Place for some time.

Warren Close. 1963. 40 addresses. This was probably originally part of the planned route for the extension of Woodcote Road to the east (Thwarted by the cricket ground). Origin unknown, possibly related to rabbits. Off Lillington Road.

Warwick Court. 1840. Named for the nearby town. A court adjacent to No 106 Warwick Street. Earlier named Iven’s Court. Earlier houses have been demolished.

Warwick Lane. 1822. Original name for what became Portland Road. Named for nearby town. Off Bedford Street.

Warwick New Road. The section from the western end of Warwick Place to Portobello Bridge existed before 1650. The section to the east of the junction with Rugby Road probably dates from about 1838. 145 addresses. Named for nearby town. From Milverton Terrace to Portobello Bridge, junction with Rugby Road.
Blue Plaque for Samuel Lockhart, elephant trainer, at No 1.
The station opened in 1883; it replaced the one in Rugby Road.
No 8 and Sunshine House (now in Copps Road) are Listed Grade II.

Warwick Place. 1834. 241 addresses. Named for nearby town. From Warwick Street to the junction with Warwick New Road. Previous to construction the route from Warwick Street to Warwick was by Guys Cliffe Road and Rugby Road (note the angle of the junction of Guys Cliffe Road and Warwick Place).
Nos 1 to 8 Bertie Terrace, Nos 34 to 40 (evens), Nos 1 to 4 The Cedars, and No 44 (Eaton Lodge) are Listed Grade II.

Warwick Road. The early name for Old Warwick Road; the Warwick to Daventry turnpike. Named for nearby town.

Warwick Street. 1808. 258 addresses. Initially named Upper Cross Street; renamed in 1813. Named for nearby town. From Clarendon Street to the Dell.
Blue Plaque for John Cundall, architect (of the Town Hall and several other buildings in the town), at No 37.
Nos 31 to 39 (odds), Nos 51, 53, 59, 75, 77, 79, 81A (Connect House), 85A (Chandos House), 105 to 111 (odds), Nos 36, 42, 62, 64, 84 to 98 (evens) and The Prince of Wales Inn are Listed Grade II.

Warwick Terrace. 1834. 46 addresses. Named for nearby town. From Warwick Street to Beauchamp Hill, alongside The Dell.
Nos 2, 3 and 4 are Listed Grade II.

Wasdale Close. 1967. 18 addresses. Named for a place in the Lake District. Off Ullswater Avenue.

Waterloo Cottages. DATE. Demolished 1960; location not known. Named for the battle site in 1815 in respect for the Duke of Wellington

Waterloo Place. 1827. 21 addresses. Named for the battle site in 1815 in respect for the Duke of Wellington. Warwick Street.
Nos 9 to 29 are Listed Grade II.

Waterloo Street. 1846. 59 addresses. Named for the battle site in 1815 in respect for the Duke of Wellington. Off Radford Road but direct vehicle access has been closed and access is from St Mary’s Terrace.

Watersfield Gardens. About 1964 to 1968. 20 addresses. Probably named for the proximity to the canal. Beside the canal, off Gainsborough Drive, Sydenham.

Waterside Court. Clapham Terrace. CHECK. One mention found but not confirmed.

Watery Lane. Before 1783. Probably all or some of the footpath from Whitnash to Leamington which followed Whitnash Brook. The brook is now all in a culvert. A map of 1881 appears to show that this footpath began around the site of St Margaret’s Church Centre in Whitnash Road and it met Radford Road in the vicinity of Camberwell Terrace. The name is not currently used. The name Whitnash Brook is now sometimes used for Rad Brook.

Wathen Road. 1899. 92 addresses. Named for Sir Wathen Arthur Waller (1881 to 1947), lord of the manor of Lillington from 1914; he lived at Woodcote House, Leek Wootton. Off Lillington Road.

Watsons Buildings, Close or Court. 1852. Named for the Mr Watson who had his upholstery workshop in the street. Off Aylesford Street.

Waverley Road. 1926. 108 addresses. Perhaps named for Scottish connections. Off Tachbrook Street, Rushmore estate.

Waverton Mews. About 1975 to 1978. 10 addresses. Named for a place in Cumbria. Off Lambourn Crescent, Sydenham.

Webbs Court. 1853; last record in 1913, perhaps demolished or renamed. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street.

Wellington Road. 1951. 87 addresses. Probably named for the Duke of Wellington. Off Valley Road, Lillington.

Wellington Street. Name for part of Regent Street from 1826 to 1873; it was the section from the Parade to Somers Place (the boundary with Milverton at Bins Brook). Probably named for the Duke of Wellington; Battle of Waterloo 1815.

Wentworth Road. 1973. 14 addresses. Probably named for the golf course. Off Danesbury Crescent.

West Brook House. 1960. 33 addresses. Named for Bins Brook which ran along the west side of the block, now in a culvert. New Brook Street.

West Street. New name given to Printer Street about 1875. On the west side of Clemens Street.

Westbourne Place. Name used from about 1833 to 1938 when the building was demolished and a petrol station was built in the site. Origin unknown although situated to the west of Old Town. The north side of High Street from Lower Avenue towards Bath Place.

Westgrove Terrace. 1891. 11 addresses. Probably named for the western part of town. End on from west end of Conway Road; also pedestrian access from the footpath alongside the railway.

Westlea Road. 1938. 104 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Lee Road Shrubland estate.

Weston Close. About 1970 to 1975. 8 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Stanton Road, Sydenham.

Weston Court. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished DATE.

Wharf Cottage. Before 1881. This was adjacent to a wharf on the Warwick and Napton Canal (opened in 1800). Probably demolished when the building of Sydenham estate began. Off Radford Road beside the limekilns by the canal; in the vicinity of Gulliman’s Way but on the south side of the canal.

Wheathill Close. 1958. 16 addresses. Origin unknown, rural connotations. Off Beverley Road.

Whitacre Road. 1987. 13 addresses. Probably named for the villages near Coleshill in north Warwickshire. Off Loxley Way.

White Street. Before 1838. About 12 houses. Origin unknown, perhaps named for a notable person of that name. Off Althorpe Street. The street is now named as part Althorpe Street following demolition of the original housing.

Whitehead’s Buildings. Before 1880. Probably named for the owner. A court off Kenilworth Street. Demolished DATE.

Whitehead’s Court 01. Before 1852; demolished about 1956. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished DATE.

Whitehead’s Court 02. Before 1852. Probably named for the owner. Off John Street. Demolished DATE.

Whitehead’s Court 03. Mentioned once in Neilston Street in 1834; not found. Probably named for the owner. Demolished DATE.

Whitehead’s Court 04. The name given to the courtyard area off Warwick Street when the Royal Priors was built in 1988; it was well known for the seating with three elephants. Probably named for the original court off Satchwell Street (Whiteheads Court 01). Demolished DATE. The elephant installation was removed and later installed by the restaurant in the Jephson Gardens.

Whitethorn Drive. About 1993. 20 addresses. Origin unknown. Off Gresham Place.

Whittaker Avenue. 1938. Name proposed for a street on the Shrubland estate but this was changed to Elizabeth Road before naming. Origin unknown.

Wickham Court. 1927. 9 addresses. Origin unknown. Off The Holt, off Cubbington Road.

Wilhelmina Close. About 2001. 34 addresses. Named for one of three well-known performing elephants owned by Samuel Lockhart; the other two animals were Trilby and Haddie. Off Warwick New Road.

Willes Road. Initially named Nash’s Road (about 1820) then Newbold Road (1837 to 1874). 201 addresses. Named for Edward Willes, landowner at Newbold Comyn. Clarendon Street to Radford Road. The crossing of the river was earlier by what was known as Mar-Dyke bridge which was a series of stones laid across the marshland and river. The present bridge was built in 1827 to a design of John Nash; the parapet was replaced later.
The following have Blue Plaques in place – at No 5, Elizabeth and Frederick Whitehead, artists; at No 6, Randolph Turpin, boxer; at No 13, William Amey, VC.
Nos 5 to 15 (odds)(previously Lansdowne Terrace), Victoria House, East Lodge, Willes Bridge. Nos 63 to 69 (odds), Trevor House, Nos 73 and 83, Sherwood, Nos 14 to 18 (evens), 28, Nos 36, 38 and 40 are Listed Grade II.

Willes Terrace. 1838. 21 addresses. Named as part of Leam Terrace East until 1873. Named for Edward Willes of Newbold Comyn. Off Leam Terrace East.

William Street. 1827. 18 addresses. Initially a mews road behind Hamilton Terrace and Brandon Parade; named about 1852. Named for William Thomas, architect. Off Wood Street.

William Thomas House. Built on the site of a garage in Willes Road about 1995, DATE. 9 addresses. Named for the architect, William Thomas.

William’s Court. 1841. Probably named for the owner. Off Satchwell Street. Demolished DATE.

Willow House. About 2002. 66 addresses. Probably named for a tree down by the nearby river. Part of Lucas Court, Warwick New Road.

Wilnecote Grove. About 1978 to 1982. 20 addresses. Probably named for the place near Tamworth. Off Emmott Drive, Sydenham.

Wimbourne Place. This was the new name for Dickins Yard off Kenilworth Street from 1936; it was demolished about 1960. Possibly named for the place in Dorset.

Windermere Drive. 1965. No houses, it simply leads to other streets. Named for the largest lake in the Lake District. Off Beverley Road.

Windham Terrace. 1858. Origin unknown. A terrace on the south side of High Street where part of the Copps’ Royal Hotel had been adjacent to the railway. This name is no longer used.

Windmill Road. 1932. 73 addresses. Named for the windmill which stood to the south of the street. Off Tachbrook Road.

Windsor Club. See Salisbury Hall.

Windsor Court 01. Before 1841. Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. Windsor Street. Demolished about 1957, DATE.

Windsor Court 02. Before 1843. Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. One mention found of a location in Ranelagh Street. Demolished DATE.

Windsor Place. 1847. 18 addresses. The previous name was Morris Street (1810 to 1847). Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. From Bedford Street to Windsor Street.

Windsor Street. 1821. 68 addresses. Named for the Royal town in Berkshire. From Regent Street to Warwick Street. Demolished in slum clearance from about 1957.

Winslow Close. About 1992, DATE. 5 addresses. Possibly named for the town in Buckinghamshire. Off Goodfellow Street, Milverton.

Winston Crescent. 1961. 39 addresses. Probably named for Sir Winston Churchill. Off Newland Road.

Wise Street. 1810. 14 addresses. Named for Matthew Wise, landowner, resident of the nearby Manor House in Avenue Road. Off High Street.

Wise Terrace. Before 1860. 5 addresses. Named for Matthew Wise, landowner. Off Wise Street.

Withy Bank. About 1998 to 2002. 20 addresses. The old name for the Osier Willows which still flourish on the banks of Rad Brook (or Whitnash Brook). Off St Fremund Way, Sydenham.

Woburn Close. About 1986 to 1990. 12 addresses. Named for the stately home in Bedfordshire. Off Marlborough Drive, Sydenham.

Wood Street. 1859. 17 addresses. Possibly named for the vicar of St Luke’s Chapel in Holly Walk. Off Brandon Parade, Holly Walk.

Woodbine Cottages. 1860, DATE. 5 addresses. Possibly named for the plant, otherwise known as honeysuckle. Off Woodbine Street.

Woodbine Street. 1854. 26 addresses. Possibly named for the plant, otherwise known as honeysuckle. Off Church Hill.

Woodbine Terrace 01. Before 1881; demolished 1960. Possibly named for the plant, otherwise known as honeysuckle. At the end of Waterloo Street, facing the canal. One reference is to Place instead of to Terrace.

Woodbine Terrace 02. DATE. Several references to this street in Milverton from 1856 to 1879. LOCATION. Possibly an alternative name for all or part of Woodbine Street.

Woodcote Road. 1889. 39 addresses. Possibly named for Woodcote House at Leek Wootton. Off Kenilworth Road. The stub to the east of the Kenilworth Road was possibly intended to reach to Lillington Road; not built; the east end at Lillington Road is now Warren Close.

Wych Elm Drive. 1996. 29 addresses. Named for a tree for the arboretum at Dr John Hitchman’s Hydropathic Establishment. Off St Helens Road.

Wye Close. DATE. 9 addresses. Probably named for the river in South Wales. Off Valley Road.

 

The Streets of Leamington beginning with Y

Note. A typical entry lists the date of the street, the origin of the name and finally the location of the street. Please refer to the page entitled Streets of Leamington for more information.

Yew Tree Court. 1996. 29 addresses. Named for a tree for the arboretum at Dr John Hitchman’s Hydropathic Establishment. Off St Helens Road.

York Bridge. 1893. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. This is a footbridge from the Pump Room Gardens to the River Walk and York Walk.
It is probably Listed Grade II as part of the listing of the Spa Gardens although it is not specified.

York Parade. 1893. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Possibly alternative name for York Walk (below).

York Promenade. 1893. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Earlier name for York Road.

York Road. 1893. 15 addresses. On part of Perkins’ plant nursery. Named to honour the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Avenue Road to Adelaide Road.

York Terrace. 1828. Named for the Duke of York. Early name for the west side of the Parade from Warwick Street to Clarendon Avenue; this was not renamed as part of the Parade until 1873.
Nos 12 to 42 (evens) Parade are Listed Grade II*.

York Walk. 1893. Named for the marriage of the Duke of York to Princess Mary in 1893; he later became King George V. Footpath from York Bridge to Avenue Road (R). The continuation to the west to Princes Drive was named New River Walk and in 2019 the whole path is usually simply called the River Walk.

Yorkville Terrace. 1887. Named for the Duke of York who would become King George V. A terrace in Victoria Street.